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The abortion issue in Newfoundland: a province divided.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235319
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Apr 15;136(8):865-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1987

According to need? Predicting the amount of municipal home help allocated to elderly recipients in an urban area of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51849
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2005 Jul;13(4):366-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Bettina Meinow
Ingemar Kåreholt
Mårten Lagergren
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. bettina.meinow@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2005 Jul;13(4):366-77
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health Policy
Health services needs and demand
Home Care Services - utilization
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
State Medicine
Sweden
Urban Population
Abstract
Given the cutbacks which have been carried out in the Swedish welfare state despite the unchanged official policy of allocation of home help services according to needs, it is essential to evaluate the factors which guide the allocation of home help today. Whereas numerous studies have identified factors which predict entry into the home help system, the present paper concentrates on predictors of the amount of home help amongst those allocated assistance. Data were obtained from the population-based care and services section of the 2002 Swedish National Study of Aging and Care-Kungsholmen (SNAC-K). All home help recipients (> or = 65 years of age) living in an inner city district of Stockholm (Kungsholmen) were analysed with ordinary least squares regressions to identify predictors of the number of hours of home help (n = 943). Need indicators, i.e. dependency in activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental ADLs (IADLs), and cognitive impairment (Berger scale) were the strongest predictors of more hours of home help. The addition of sociodemographic (i.e. age, gender and income), environmental (i.e. informal care, housing adaptations and housing accessibility) and structural (i.e. variations in allocation decisions between one care manager and another) factors contributed only marginally to the explained variance. Hours of help entitlement increased slightly with greater age. Co-residing individuals were allocated significantly fewer home help hours than those living alone. Income and regular access to informal care were not significant predictors. The fact that services are provided according to need criteria does not necessarily mean that the provided services are adequate to meet needs. On the macro level, social policy decisions and available economic and manpower resources determine the allotment of municipal home help. However, this study in an urban sample suggests that, within the available resources, the amount of home help allocated is guided mainly by need indicators amongst those given assistance.
PubMed ID
15969708 View in PubMed
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Activating knowledge for patient safety practices: a Canadian academic-policy partnership.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129005
Source
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2012 Feb;9(1):49-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Margaret B Harrison
Wendy Nicklin
Marie Owen
Christina Godfrey
Janice McVeety
Val Angus
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. margaret.b.harrison@queensu.ca
Source
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2012 Feb;9(1):49-58
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees - organization & administration - standards
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Evidence-Based Practice - methods - organization & administration - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods - organization & administration - standards
Safety Management - methods - organization & administration - standards
State Medicine - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
Over the past decade, the need for healthcare delivery systems to identify and address patient safety issues has been propelled to the forefront. A Canadian survey, for example, demonstrated patient safety to be a major concern of frontline nurses (Nicklin & McVeety 2002). Three crucial patient safety elements, current knowledge, resources, and context of care have been identified by the World Health Organization (WHO 2009). To develop strategies to respond to the scope and mandate of the WHO report within the Canadian context, a pan-Canadian academic-policy partnership has been established.
This newly formed Pan-Canadian Partnership, the Queen's Joanna Briggs Collaboration for Patient Safety (referred throughout as "QJBC" or "the Partnership"), includes the Queen's University School of Nursing, Accreditation Canada, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI), the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and is supported by an active and committed advisory council representing over 10 national organizations representing all sectors of the health continuum, including patients/families advocacy groups, professional associations, and other bodies. This unique partnership is designed to provide timely, focused support from academia to the front line of patient safety. QJBC has adopted an "integrated knowledge translation" approach to identify and respond to patient safety priorities and to ensure active engagement with stakeholders in producing and using available knowledge. Synthesis of evidence and guideline adaptation methodologies are employed to access quantitative and qualitative evidence relevant to pertinent patient safety questions and subsequently, to respond to issues of feasibility, meaningfulness, appropriateness/acceptability, and effectiveness.
This paper describes the conceptual grounding of the Partnership, its proposed methods, and its plan for action. It is hoped that our journey may provide some guidance to others as they develop patient safety models within their own arenas.
PubMed ID
22151727 View in PubMed
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Adherence to national guidelines for initiation of antiretroviral regimens in HIV patients: a Danish nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137186
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2011 Jul;72(1):116-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Tonny S Petersen
Stig E Andersen
January Gerstoft
Kristina Thorsteinsson
Carsten S Larsen
Gitte Pedersen
Court Pedersen
Niels Obel
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2400 Copenhagen, Denmark. tsp@person.dk
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2011 Jul;72(1):116-24
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-HIV Agents - administration & dosage
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active - methods - standards
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Guideline Adherence
HIV Infections - drug therapy
Humans
Male
Patient compliance
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Regression Analysis
State Medicine
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To determine the adherence to the national guidelines for start of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) in HIV infected patients.
We used a Danish nationwide cohort of HIV infected patients to calculate the fraction of patients who in the period 1997-2006 started HAART according to the guidelines from The Danish Society of Infectious Diseases. We used Kaplan-Meier tables to estimate time from fulfilling the criteria for start of HAART to initiation of the treatment. Cox regression and logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for delayed initiation of treatment and chance of being included in clinical trials.
The study included 3223 patients, 74% of whom initiated HAART in the study period. Ninety-four% fulfilled the criteria for start of HAART, with minor differences over calendar periods. Ninety-four% initiated a recommended regimen or were included in a clinical trial. Intravenous drug use predicted initiation of a non-recommended regimen and delay in start of HAART, while non-Caucasians were less likely to be included in clinical trials.
In a Western world setting, the adherence to national guidelines for start of HAART can be high. We suggest that simplicity of the guidelines, centralization of treatment and involvement of local clinicians in the development of guidelines are of major importance for high adherence to treatment guidelines.
Notes
Cites: Stud Health Technol Inform. 2008;136:339-4418487754
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Cites: Antivir Ther. 2009;14(7):995-100019918103
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Cites: HIV Med. 2004 Nov;5(6):415-2015544693
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Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2007 Jan 1;44(1):20-917091020
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2007 Jan 16;146(2):87-9517227932
Cites: Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2007 Dec;64(6):722-517953721
Cites: HIV Med. 2008 Jan;9(1):47-5618199172
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Feb 25;170(9):740-418307962
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2008 Mar 1;47(3):377-8318176324
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Aug 6;300(5):555-7018677028
PubMed ID
21306418 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue concentrations of persistent organic pollutants and the risk of prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81490
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;48(7):700-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Hardell Lennart
Andersson Swen-Olof
Carlberg Michael
Bohr Louise
van Bavel Bert
Lindström Gunilla
Björnfoth Helen
Ginman Claes
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden. lennart.hardell@orebroll.se
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;48(7):700-7
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - physiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - metabolism
Prostate-Specific Antigen - analysis
Prostatic Hyperplasia - etiology
Risk assessment
State Medicine
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We sought to study the concentrations of certain persistent organic pollutants with endocrine-disrupting properties in cases with prostate cancer and controls with benign prostate hyperplasia. METHODS: Adipose tissue was obtained from 58 cases and 20 controls. RESULTS: The median concentration among controls was used as cut-off in the statistical analysis. In the total material, a greater-than median concentration of PCB congener 153 yielded an odds ratio (OR) of 3.15 and 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.04-9.54 and one chlordane type, trans-chlordane, yielded OR 3.49 (95% CI = 1.08-11.2). In the group of case subjects with PSA levels greater than the median level of 16.5 ng/mL, PCB 153 was OR 30.3 (95% CI = 3.24-284), hexachlorobenzene OR = 9.84 (95% CI = 1.99-48.5), trans-chlordane OR = 11.0 (95% CI = 1.87-64.9), and the chlordane-type MC6 OR = 7.58 (95% CI = 1.65-34.9). The grouping of PCBs according to structural and biological activity was found to produce significantly increased risks for enzyme and phenobarbital-inducing PCBs and lower chlorinated PCBs in the case group with PSA levels greater than 16.5 ng/mL. CONCLUSIONS: These chemicals might be of etiologic significance but need to be further investigated. The biological relevance of the arbitrary cut-off point of PSA is unclear.
PubMed ID
16832227 View in PubMed
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Agents of their health? How the Swedish welfare state introduces expectations of individual responsibility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142011
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2010 Sep;32(6):930-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Dimitris Michailakis
Werner Schirmer
Author Affiliation
Academy for Health and Working Life, University of Gävle, Sweden.
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2010 Sep;32(6):930-47
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Choice Behavior
Health status
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Life Style
Personal Autonomy
Politics
Sick Role
Social Perception
Social Responsibility
Social Welfare
State Medicine
Sweden
Abstract
In recent years, the notion of individual responsibility for one's health has been introduced into Swedish medico-political debate. Formerly expressed as a recommendation, it has now taken on the form of expectations. In a Swedish context, this shift from collective to individual responsibility is novel because it implies a break with well-established welfare state practice of comprehensive care for their citizens. Using a systems-theoretical approach, we interpret this shift of expectations as a political solution to the problem of legitimate allocation of scarce resources. A more inclusive medical conception of illness has facilitated the introduction of many new diagnoses that, in turn, have lead to a strong increase in claims for medical treatment and for compensation. This semantic change in medicine aggravates the budgetary situation of the welfare state. The political solution lies in a reorientation of the expectations the medical system can have on citizens as well as a shift of the expectations regarding the rights and obligations citizens can have on the medical system. Individuals are increasingly expected to live healthy lifestyles and to avoid hazardous habits. If they do not live up to these expectations, they have to face low prioritisation or denial of treatment.
PubMed ID
20649889 View in PubMed
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Allocation of labour to somatic and psychiatric specialist care--the effects of earmarked grants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82779
Source
Health Policy. 2006 Oct;78(2-3):115-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Halsteinli Vidar
Ose Solveig Osborg
Torvik Heidi
Hagen Terje P
Author Affiliation
SINTEF Health Services Research, NO-7465 Trondheim, Norway. vidar.halsteinli@sintef.no
Source
Health Policy. 2006 Oct;78(2-3):115-27
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aged
Financing, Organized - economics
Health Care Rationing
Humans
Management Audit
Norway
Psychiatric Somatic Therapies - manpower
Resource Allocation - economics
Specialties, Medical
State Medicine
Abstract
Until 2002, counties were responsible for providing both somatic and psychiatric specialized health care services in Norway. The financing arrangement of the counties consisted of fixed local taxes, a general block grant and different types of earmarked grants from the national government. Since 1997, earmarked conditional grants related to DRG-activity have been used for somatic services, whereas earmarked unconditional grants have been used for mental health care services from approximately the same time. This paper analyse the price and revenue effects of grants on the allocation of labour, with special attention to the two types of earmarked grants: conditional and unconditional. Theoretically, labour (as an index of production output) is assumed to be allocated to somatic and psychiatric services dependent upon revenues (taxes, block grants and earmarked unconditional grants), price per labour-year (that among other things are affected by earmarked conditional grants) and the preferences of the local government (which relate to the age structure and population density of the county). We assume that a conditional grant reduces the net price of labour and thereby increases the (relative) demand, whereas an unconditional grant adds to the other revenues of the county and do not affect the relative allocation of labour. Data from a panel of 18 counties for the period 1992-2001 is analysed using OLS with fixed effects. The results show revenue effects and direct price effects as expected. However, the assumption that unconditional grants do not affect relative allocation of labours is not supported. We find a positive effect of the unconditional grant to psychiatric care on the demand for labour in this sector. We interpret this as an effect of hierarchical governance such as supervision and monitoring that were remedies that were used together with the unconditional grant.
PubMed ID
16472885 View in PubMed
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Alternative health care options in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196230
Source
Can Nurse. 1999 Nov;95(10):26-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
J. McClennon-Leong
J R Kerr
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 1999 Nov;95(10):26-30
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Complementary Therapies - trends - utilization
Holistic Nursing - trends
Humans
State Medicine - trends - utilization
PubMed ID
11140037 View in PubMed
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Analysing the diffusion and adoption of mobile IT across social worlds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259650
Source
Health Informatics J. 2014 Jun;20(2):87-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Jeppe Agger Nielsen
Shegaw Anagaw Mengiste
Source
Health Informatics J. 2014 Jun;20(2):87-103
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cell Phones
Computers, Handheld
Denmark
Diffusion of Innovation
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Social Networking
State Medicine - organization & administration
Abstract
The diffusion and adoption of information technology innovations (e.g. mobile information technology) in healthcare organizations involves a dynamic process of change with multiple stakeholders with competing interests, varying commitments, and conflicting values. Nevertheless, the extant literature on mobile information technology diffusion and adoption has predominantly focused on organizations and individuals as the unit of analysis, with little emphasis on the environment in which healthcare organizations are embedded. We propose the social worlds approach as a promising theoretical lens for dealing with this limitation together with reports from a case study of a mobile information technology innovation in elderly home care in Denmark including both the sociopolitical and organizational levels in the analysis. Using the notions of social worlds, trajectories, and boundary objects enables us to show how mobile information technology innovation in Danish home care can facilitate negotiation and collaboration across different social worlds in one setting while becoming a source of tension and conflicts in others. The trajectory of mobile information technology adoption was shaped by influential stakeholders in the Danish home care sector. Boundary objects across multiple social worlds legitimized the adoption, but the use arrangement afforded by the new technology interfered with important aspects of home care practices, creating resistance among the healthcare personnel.
PubMed ID
24810724 View in PubMed
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454 records – page 1 of 46.