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Acute kidney injury after lung resection surgery: incidence and perioperative risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125809
Source
Anesth Analg. 2012 Jun;114(6):1256-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Seiji Ishikawa
Donald E G Griesdale
Jens Lohser
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Anesth Analg. 2012 Jun;114(6):1256-62
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Acute Kidney Injury - epidemiology - mortality
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Comorbidity
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Hydroxyethyl Starch Derivatives - adverse effects
Incidence
Intubation, Intratracheal - adverse effects
Length of Stay
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Perioperative Period
Plasma Substitutes - adverse effects
Pneumonectomy - adverse effects - methods - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Thoracoscopy - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
Postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased perioperative morbidity and mortality in a variety of surgical settings, but has not been well studied after lung resection surgery. In the present study, we defined the incidence of postoperative AKI, identified risk factors, and clarified the relationship between postoperative AKI and outcome in patients undergoing lung resection surgery.
A retrospective, observational study of patients who underwent lung resection surgery between January 2006 and March 2010 in a tertiary care academic center was conducted. Postoperative AKI was diagnosed within 72 hours after surgery based on the Acute Kidney Injury Network creatinine criteria. Logistic regression was used to model the association between perioperative factors and the risk of AKI within 72 hours after surgery. The relationship between postoperative AKI and patient outcome including mortality, days in hospital, and the requirement of reintubation was investigated.
A total of 1129 patients (pneumonectomy n = 71, bilobectomy n = 30, lobectomy n = 580, segmentectomy n = 35, wedge resection/bullectomy n = 413) were included in the final analysis. Patients were an average of 61 years (SD 15) and 50% were female. AKI was diagnosed in 67 patients (5.9%) based on Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria (stage 1, n = 59; stage 2, n = 8; and stage 3, n = 0) within 72 hours after surgery, and only 1 patient required renal replacement therapy. Multivariate analysis demonstrated an independent association between postoperative AKI and hypertension (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-3.8), peripheral vascular disease (OR 4.4, 95% CI: 1.8-10), estimated glomerular filtration rate (OR 0.8, 95% CI: 0.69-0.93), preoperative use of angiotensin II receptor blockers (OR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.1-4.4), intraoperative hydroxyethyl starch administration (OR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1-2.1), and thoracoscopic (versus open) procedures (OR 0.37, 95% CI: 0.15-0.90). Development of AKI was associated with increased rates of tracheal reintubation (12% vs 2%, P
Notes
Comment In: Anesth Analg. 2013 Feb;116(2):505-623460946
Comment In: Anesth Analg. 2013 Feb;116(2):504-523340751
PubMed ID
22451594 View in PubMed
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Application of multilocus enzyme electrophoresis in studies of the epidemiology of Listeria monocytogenes in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220463
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1993 Sep;59(9):2817-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
B. Nørrung
N. Skovgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1993 Sep;59(9):2817-22
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle
Denmark - epidemiology
Electrophoresis, Starch Gel
Enzymes - genetics - isolation & purification
Fishes
Food Microbiology
Genetic Variation
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - enzymology - genetics
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Sheep
Abstract
A total of 245 strains of Listeria monocytogenes were investigated. These strains were isolated from human and animal cases of listeriosis as well as from different kinds of raw and processed foods. Thirty-three electrophoretic types (ETs) were identified among the 245 strains. The strains investigated included all human clinical strains isolated in Denmark during 1989 and 1990. Seventy-three percent of the strains isolated in this period were assigned to one of only two ETs (ET 1 and ET 4). ET 1, which was found to be the most frequently occurring ET among strains isolated from human clinical cases, was also found to occur rather frequently in animal clinical cases. ET 1 was, however, found only sporadically among strains isolated from foods and food factories. The data indicate that there might be something distinctive about the physiology or ecology of the ET 1 clone which makes it more likely to bring about disease in human beings either because of high pathogenicity or because of a special ability to multiply to infectious doses in processed foods. Another type, designated ET 4, was found to be the next most frequently occurring ET, after ET 1, among human clinical isolates. This could be explained by the fact that ET 4 was found to be the most frequently occurring ET within food isolates.
Notes
Cites: Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand B Microbiol Immunol. 1972;Suppl 229:1-1574624477
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Jan 27;308(4):203-66401354
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1986 May;51(5):873-842425735
Cites: J Appl Bacteriol. 1987 Jul;63(1):1-113115937
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1989 May;86(10):3818-222498876
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 1992 Jan-Feb;15(1-2):51-91622759
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1990 Jul;56(7):2133-412117880
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 1988 May;6(3):229-423152796
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 1988 Jun;6(4):317-263152800
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1991 Jun;57(6):1624-91908204
Cites: J Infect. 1990 May;20(3):251-92341735
PubMed ID
8215357 View in PubMed
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Application of the phosphoglucomutase (PGM) system of human red cells in paternity cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61174
Source
Vox Sang. 1969 Mar;16(3):211-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1969

Bedtime uncooked cornstarch supplement prevents nocturnal hypoglycaemia in intensively treated type 1 diabetes subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47998
Source
J Intern Med. 1999 Mar;245(3):229-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
M. Axelsen
C. Wesslau
P. Lönnroth
R. Arvidsson Lenner
U. Smith
Author Affiliation
Lundberg Laboratory for Diabetes Research, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg University, Sweden. mette.axelsen@medicine.gu.se
Source
J Intern Med. 1999 Mar;245(3):229-36
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cookery
Cross-Over Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - drug therapy
Double-Blind Method
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Hypoglycemia - blood - chemically induced - prevention & control
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - blood
Insulin, Long-Acting - adverse effects - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Starch - administration & dosage
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The present study tests two interrelated hypotheses: (1) that bedtime ingestion of uncooked cornstarch exerts a lower and delayed nocturnal blood glucose peak compared with a conventional snack; (2) that bedtime carbohydrate supplement, administered as uncooked cornstarch, prevents nocturnal hypoglycaemia without altering metabolic control in intensively treated type 1 diabetes (IDDM) patients. DESIGN AND SUBJECTS: The above hypotheses were tested separately (1) by pooling and analysing data from two overnight studies of comparable groups of patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) (14 and 10 patients, respectively), and (2) by a double-blind, randomized 4-week cross-over study in 12 intensively treated IDDM patients. SETTING: Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg. Sweden. INTERVENTIONS: (1) Ingestion of uncooked cornstarch and wholemeal bread (0.6 g of carbohydrates kg-1 body weight) and carbohydrate-free placebo at 22.00 h. (2) Intake of uncooked cornstarch (0.3 g kg-1 body weight) and carbohydrate-free placebo at 23.00 h. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Nocturnal glucose and insulin levels; (2) frequency of self-estimated hypoglycaemia (blood glucose [BG] levels
PubMed ID
10205584 View in PubMed
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Berries reduce postprandial insulin responses to wheat and rye breads in healthy women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116740
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Apr;143(4):430-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Riitta Törrönen
Marjukka Kolehmainen
Essi Sarkkinen
Kaisa Poutanen
Hannu Mykkänen
Leo Niskanen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Apr;143(4):430-6
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis
Bread
Cross-Over Studies
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Fragaria
Fruit
Humans
Insulin - blood
Middle Aged
Photinia
Postprandial Period - physiology
Ribes
Secale cereale
Single-Blind Method
Starch - administration & dosage
Triticum
Vaccinium macrocarpon
Vaccinium myrtillus
Vaccinium vitis-idaea
Abstract
Starch in white wheat bread (WB) induces high postprandial glucose and insulin responses. For rye bread (RB), the glucose response is similar, whereas the insulin response is lower. In vitro studies suggest that polyphenol-rich berries may reduce digestion and absorption of starch and thereby suppress postprandial glycemia, but the evidence in humans is limited. We investigated the effects of berries consumed with WB or RB on postprandial glucose and insulin responses. Healthy females (n = 13-20) participated in 3 randomized, controlled, crossover, 2-h meal studies. They consumed WB or RB, both equal to 50 g available starch, with 150 g whole-berry purée or the same amount of bread without berries as reference. In study 1, WB was served with strawberries, bilberries, or lingonberries and in study 2 with raspberries, cloudberries, or chokeberries. In study 3, WB or RB was served with a mixture of berries consisting of equal amounts of strawberries, bilberries, cranberries, and blackcurrants. Strawberries, bilberries, lingonberries, and chokeberries consumed with WB and the berry mixture consumed with WB or RB significantly reduced the postprandial insulin response. Only strawberries (36%) and the berry mixture (with WB, 38%; with RB, 19%) significantly improved the glycemic profile of the breads. These results suggest than when WB is consumed with berries, less insulin is needed for maintenance of normal or slightly improved postprandial glucose metabolism. The lower insulin response to RB compared with WB can also be further reduced by berries.
PubMed ID
23365108 View in PubMed
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Breakfast glycaemic response in patients with type 2 diabetes: effects of bedtime dietary carbohydrates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47937
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1999 Sep;53(9):706-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
M. Axelsen
R. Arvidsson Lenner
P. Lönnroth
U. Smith
Author Affiliation
The Lundberg Laboratory for Diabetes Research, Department of Internal Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1999 Sep;53(9):706-10
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Comparative Study
Cross-Over Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage - metabolism
Digestion
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - blood
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Lactates - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Starch - administration & dosage - metabolism
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Bedtime carbohydrate (CHO) intake in patients with type-2 diabetes may improve glucose tolerance at breakfast the next morning. We examined the 'overnight second-meal effect' of bedtime supplements containing 'rapid' or 'slow' CHOs. DESIGN: Randomized cross-over study with three test-periods, each consisting of two days on a standardized diet, followed by a breakfast tolerance test on the third morning. SETTING: The Lundberg Laboratory for Diabetes Research, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. SUBJECTS: Sixteen patients with type 2 diabetes on oral agents and/or diet. INTERVENTIONS: Two different bedtime (22.00 h) CHO supplements (0.46 g available CHO/kg body weight) were compared to a starch-free placebo ('normal' food regimen). The CHOs were provided as uncooked cornstarch (slow-release CHOs) or white bread (rapid CHOs). RESULTS: On the mornings after different bedtime meals we found similar fasting glucose, insulin, free fatty acid and lactate levels. However, the glycaemic response after breakfast was 21% less after uncooked cornstarch compared to placebo ingestion at bedtime (406 +/- 46 vs 511 +/- 61 mmol min l(-1), P
PubMed ID
10509766 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer rates in populations of single women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature28029
Source
Br J Cancer. 1975 Jan;31(1):118-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1975
Author
G. Hems
A. Stuart
Source
Br J Cancer. 1975 Jan;31(1):118-23
Date
Jan-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Denmark
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates
Female
Fertility
Humans
Italy
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Single Person
Starch
Sucrose
Time Factors
Abstract
The well known associations of breast cancer with fertility patterns and diet are interdependent and it is difficult to estimate the extent to which breast cancer is related to diet. This was attempted by analysing breast cancer rates in populations of single (never married) women for which the contribution of childbearing would be small. Age specific breast cancer rates for single women showed the same variation by country, social class, urban-rural area and with time, as did the corresponding rates for married women, suggesting that common or related factors determined breast cancer rates in single and married women. Also, dietary correlations of breast cancer rates at 55-64 years, around 1960, were not sifnificantly different for single women and the general female population. This supported the view that the dietary associations with breast cancer, observed in larger studies of general female populations, did not arise indirectly from an association with childbearing rates. It was pointed our that the positive association of breast cancer with sugar, observed for single and for all women, was accopanied by a negative association with starch. These opposite associations with two forms of varbohydrate seemed inconsistent on general nutritional grounds and could be explained as arising indirectly to the association of breast cancer with affluence. Otherwise, it would seem necessary to establish a nutritional difference between starch and sugar, which could reasonably influence breast cancer rates, before the association was accepted as indicating cause.
PubMed ID
1156503 View in PubMed
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79 records – page 1 of 8.