Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Chronic heart failure and mortality in patients with community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283882
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2016 May 25;16:227
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-25-2016
Author
J. Smit
K. Adelborg
RW Thomsen
M. Søgaard
HC Schønheyder
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2016 May 25;16:227
Date
May-25-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteremia - etiology - mortality
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Community-Acquired Infections - complications - microbiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Regression Analysis
Staphylococcal Infections - complications - microbiology
Staphylococcus aureus - physiology
Abstract
Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) may experience higher mortality of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) than patients without CHF due to insufficient cardiovascular responses during systemic infection. We investigated 90-day mortality in SAB patients with and without CHF.
Using population-based medical databases, we conducted a cohort study of all adult patients with community-acquired SAB (CA-SAB) in Northern Denmark, 2000-2011. Ninety-day mortality after SAB for patients with and without CHF was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Based on Cox regression analysis, we computed hazard ratios as estimates of mortality rate ratios (MRRs) overall and stratified by CHF-related conditions (e.g., cardiomyopathy and valvular heart disease), CHF severity (defined by daily dosage of loop-diuretics), and CHF duration while adjusting for potential confounders.
Among 2638 SAB patients, 390 (14.8 %) had a history of CHF. Ninety-day mortality was 45 % in patients with CHF and 30 % in patients without CHF, which yielded an adjusted MRR (aMRR) of 1.24 (95 % CI, 1.04-1.48). Compared to patients without CHF, the excess risk of death was most pronounced among patients with valvular heart disease (aMRR?=?1.73 (95 % CI, 1.26-2.38)), patients with daily loop-diuretic dosages of 81-159 mg/day (aMRR?=?1.55 (95 % CI, 1.11-2.14)) and =160 mg/day (aMRR?=?1.62 (95 % CI, 1.21-2.18)), and among patients with
Notes
Cites: Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin. 2010 Jun-Jul;28(6):349-5420430483
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2013 Apr 11;368(15):1425-3323574121
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2011 May 28;11:8321619668
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):22-521775345
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2010 Aug;65(8):1792-820511366
Cites: Curr Heart Fail Rep. 2014 Dec;11(4):404-1525182014
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2006 Jun 15;97(12 ):1759-6416765130
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1987;40(5):373-833558716
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2013 May;19(5):465-7122616816
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Aug;29(8):541-924965263
Cites: Circ Res. 2013 Aug 30;113(6):646-5923989710
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2006 Apr;12(4):345-5216524411
Cites: Heart Fail Rev. 2010 Nov;15(6):605-1120571889
Cites: Clin Epidemiol. 2010 Dec 02;2:273-921152254
Cites: BMC Infect Dis. 2015 Mar 04;15:11625887177
Cites: Curr Opin Infect Dis. 2010 Aug;23(4):346-5820592532
Cites: Chest. 2006 May;129(5):1349-6616685029
Cites: Clin Microbiol Rev. 2012 Apr;25(2):362-8622491776
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2008 Jul;10(7):658-6018539522
Cites: Clin Epidemiol. 2011 Apr 01;3:133-821487452
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):30-321775347
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2013 Aug 29;369(9):840-5123984731
Cites: J Infect. 2013 Sep;67(3):199-20523664855
Cites: Diabetologia. 2014 Aug;57(8):1595-60024849568
PubMed ID
27225712 View in PubMed
Less detail

Glycopeptide resistance in coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated in blood cultures from patients with hematological malignancies during three decades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133081
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Nov;30(11):1349-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
E. Ahlstrand
K. Svensson
L. Persson
U. Tidefelt
B. Söderquist
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Örebro University Hospital, 701 85 Örebro, Sweden. erik.ahlstrand@orebroll.se
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Nov;30(11):1349-54
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacteremia - complications - microbiology
Coagulase
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Glycopeptides - pharmacology
Hematologic Neoplasms - complications
Humans
Immunocompromised Host
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Retrospective Studies
Species Specificity
Staphylococcal Infections - complications - microbiology
Staphylococcus epidermidis - drug effects
Staphylococcus haemolyticus - drug effects
Sweden
Teicoplanin - pharmacology
Vancomycin - pharmacology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine if there was a long-term increase in glycopeptide minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values, MIC creep, among bloodstream isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. haemolyticus isolated from patients with hematological malignancies. We conducted a retrospective single-center study where all positive blood cultures of S. epidermidis (n = 387) and S. haemolyticus (n = 19) isolated from patients with hematological malignancies during three decades, 1980 to 2009, were re-evaluated for the presence of reduced susceptibility to vancomycin and teicoplanin. Three different methods for the detection of reduced susceptibility to glycopeptides were used; standard Etest, macromethod Etest, and glycopeptide resistance detection (GRD) Etest. The median MIC value for vancomycin was 2 mg/L. MIC values for vancomycin and teicoplanin did not show any statistically significant increase during the study period. The presence of heterogeneously glycopeptide-intermediate staphylococci (hGIS) was analyzed among 405 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) isolates. hGIS were found in 31-45% of the CoNS isolates by the macromethod Etest and in 53-67% by the GRD Etest during the three decades. In conclusion, we did not observe any long-term glycopeptide MIC creep determined by the standard Etest, although a high and increasing proportion of heterogeneous vancomycin resistance was observed.
PubMed ID
21744039 View in PubMed
Less detail

Norwegian scabies and a toxic shock syndrome toxin 1-producing strain of Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis in a patient with trisomy 21.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54344
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 1998 Sep;27(3):645-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998

Outcome of Community-Acquired Staphylococcus aureus Bacteraemia in Patients with Diabetes: A Historical Population-Based Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275905
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(4):e0153766
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Jesper Smit
Reimar Wernich Thomsen
Henrik Carl Schønheyder
Henrik Nielsen
Trine Frøslev
Mette Søgaard
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(4):e0153766
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteremia - microbiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark
Diabetes Complications - microbiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Staphylococcal Infections - complications - microbiology - mortality
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Patients with diabetes (DM) experience increased risk of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB), but the prognostic impact of diabetes in patients with SAB remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated 30-day all-cause mortality in patients with and without DM.
Population-based medical databases were used to conduct a cohort study of all adult patients with community-acquired SAB in Northern Denmark, 2000-2011. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we computed hazard ratios as estimates of 30-day mortality rate ratios (MRRs) among patients with and without DM. We further investigated whether the prognostic impact of DM differed among patients with and without recent preadmission healthcare contacts (within 30 days of the current hospitalization) and by age, sex, marital status, level of comorbidity, and DM-related characteristics (e.g., duration of DM and presence of DM complications).
Among 2638 SAB patients, 713 (27.0%) had DM. Thirty-day cumulative mortality was 25.8% in patients with DM and 24.3% in patients without DM, for an adjusted MRR (aMRR) of 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.84-1.20). In analyses with and without recent healthcare contacts, the corresponding aMRRs were 0.84 (95% CI, 0.62-1.14) and 1.13 (95% CI, 0.91-1.41), respectively. Compared to patients without DM, the aMRR was 0.94 (95% CI, 0.74-1.20) for male patients with DM and 1.13 (95% CI, 0.87-1.47) for female patients with DM. The prognostic influence of DM on mortality did not differ notably with age, level of comorbidity, or characteristics of patients with DM.
Patients with DM and community-acquired SAB did not experience higher 30-day mortality than patients without DM.
Notes
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1991 Feb;14(2):89-942060428
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1987;40(5):373-833558716
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2006 Aug 15;145(4):247-5416908915
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2006 Oct;34(10):2588-9516915117
Cites: J Infect. 2008 Jan;56(1):27-3418022242
Cites: Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2009 Dec;28(12):1477-8219730900
Cites: Curr Opin Infect Dis. 2010 Aug;23(4):346-5820592532
Cites: Lancet Infect Dis. 2011 Mar;11(3):208-2221371655
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2011 May;139(5):772-620619078
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2011;11:8321619668
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):22-521775345
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):30-321775347
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2011 Dec;94(3):311-2122079683
Cites: Clin Microbiol Rev. 2012 Apr;25(2):362-8622491776
Cites: BMC Infect Dis. 2012;12:8522487002
Cites: BMC Infect Dis. 2012;12:26023075215
Cites: J Infect. 2013 Sep;67(3):199-20523664855
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e7008223936145
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e8295824376617
Cites: J Infect. 2014 Mar;68(3):242-5124247070
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2014 Feb;103(2):137-4924630390
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Aug;29(8):541-924965263
Cites: Intern Med J. 2001 Mar;31(2):97-10311480485
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2000 Nov;31(5):1170-411073748
Cites: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2016 Feb;37(2):208-1126503397
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2003 May 1;187(9):1452-912717627
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2004 Jan;27(1):70-614693969
Cites: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2003 Dec;24(12):890-614700403
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2006 Apr;12(4):345-5216524411
PubMed ID
27082873 View in PubMed
Less detail