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19608 records – page 1 of 1961.

Source
Sygeplejersken. 1990 Mar 28;90(13):14-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-28-1990

[2 years of the Swedish pacemaker registry: a certain centralization of activities can be appropriate].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223959
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Apr 15;89(16):1380-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1992
Author
R. Nordlander
K. Pehrsson
L. Rydén
A. Bocray
Author Affiliation
kardiologiska kliniken, Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Apr 15;89(16):1380-2
Date
Apr-15-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology - economics - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Pacemaker, Artificial - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Registries - standards - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
PubMed ID
1579008 View in PubMed
Less detail

(3)H activity comparison between FTMC, VNIIM and LNE-LNHB.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278451
Source
Appl Radiat Isot. 2016 Mar;109:41-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Philippe Cassette
Paulius Butkus
Arunas Gudelis
Tatiana Shilnikova
Source
Appl Radiat Isot. 2016 Mar;109:41-3
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
France
Internationality
Laboratories - standards
Lithuania
Nuclear Medicine - standards
Radiation Dosage
Radiometry - standards
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Russia
Scintillation Counting
Sensitivity and specificity
Tritium - analysis - standards
Abstract
An activity comparison of tritiated water was organized in 2013 between 3 laboratories: FTMC (Lithuania), LNE-LNHB (France) and VNIIM (Russia). The solution was prepared by LNHB and ampoules were sent to the others laboratories. This solution was standardized in terms of activity per unit mass by participant laboratories using the Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio (TDCR) method in liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The tritiated water solution is traceable to the solution prepared by LNHB for the CCRI(II)-K2.H-3 2009 (3)H international comparison.
PubMed ID
26651170 View in PubMed
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The 3 mm skin prick test (SPT) threshold criterion is not reliable for Tyrophagus putrescentiae: the re-evaluation of SPT criterion to dust mites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71486
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
B. Kanceljak-Macan
J. Macan
D. Plavec
T. Klepac
S. Milkovic-Kraus
Author Affiliation
Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb, Croatia.
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Comparative Study
Croatia
Cross Reactions - immunology
Dermatophagoides farinae - immunology
Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Proteins - immunology
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Skin Tests - standards
Urban health
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The mean wheal diameter >/= 3 mm is the usual criterion for positive skin prick test (SPT) reaction to dust mites. The study assessed the accuracy of this SPT criterion with respect to specific IgE values of above 0.35 kUA/l (+ sIgE). METHODS: Specific IgE (ImmunoCAP, Pharmacia AB Diagnostics, Uppsala, Sweden) and standard SPT to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP) and farinae (DF), Lepidoglyphus destructor (LD) and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (TP) (ALK, Hørsholm, Denmark) were performed in a random sample of 457 subjects, of whom 273 men (mean age 35.3 +/- 11.0 years) and 184 women (mean age 37.9 +/- 9.5 years). Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test, regression analysis and discriminant analysis. RESULTS: When the mean wheal diameter of >/= 3 mm was considered positive (+ SPT), the correlation between + SPT and + sIgE was 0.47 for DP (P
PubMed ID
12464048 View in PubMed
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[3-wheeled and 4-wheeled all-terrain vehicles: unstable and dangerous vehicles].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231636
Source
Can J Public Health. 1989 Jan-Feb;80(1):28-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Delisle
C. Laberge-Nadeau
B. Brown
Source
Can J Public Health. 1989 Jan-Feb;80(1):28-30
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adolescent
Adult
Humans
Male
Motorcycles - standards
Quebec
Research Design
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We present the results of a questionnaire completed by 526 victims of accidents involving three- and four-wheeled all-terrain vehicles. All victims were treated at the emergency departments of 10 regional hospitals in Quebec. In 70% of cases, the vehicles overturned. Two thirds of victims were injured in accidents without collision, typically involving overturns on level ground or hills. We suggest accident reconstruction research as a means of identifying engineering solutions as one element in an injury control approach.
PubMed ID
2702541 View in PubMed
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The 3-year follow-up study in a block of flats - experiences in the use of the Finnish indoor climate classification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185305
Source
Indoor Air. 2003 Jun;13(2):136-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
M. Tuomainen
A. Tuomainen
J. Liesivuori
A-L Pasanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Kuopio, Finland. marja.tuomainen@hengitysliitto.fi
Source
Indoor Air. 2003 Jun;13(2):136-47
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air pollution, indoor
Allergens - analysis
Ammonia - analysis
Asthma - prevention & control
Bacteria
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Construction Materials - standards
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Housing - standards
Humans
Humidity
Questionnaires
Spores, Fungal
Temperature
Abstract
Indoor climate of two new blocks of flats was investigated. The case building was built for people with respiratory diseases by following the instructions of the Finnish Classification of Indoor Climate, Construction and Finishing Materials, while the control building was built using conventional building technology. The main indoor air parameters (temperature, relative humidity and levels of CO, CO2, ammonia, total volatile organic compounds, total suspended particles, fungal spores, bacteria and cat, dog and house dust mite allergens) were measured in six apartments of both the buildings on five occasions during the 3-year occupancy. In addition, a questionnaire to evaluate symptoms of the occupants and their satisfaction with their home environment was conducted in connection with indoor air quality (IAQ) measurements. The levels of indoor air pollutants in the case building were, in general, lower than those in the control building. In addition, the asthmatic occupants informed that their symptoms had decreased during the occupancy in the case building. This case study showed that high IAQ is possible to reach by careful design, proper materials and equipment and on high-quality construction with reasonable additional costs. In addition, the study indicated that good IAQ can also be maintained during the occupancy, if sufficient information on factors affecting IAQ and guidance on proper use and care of equipment are available for occupants.
PubMed ID
12756007 View in PubMed
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4-aminopyridine toxicity with unintentional overdose in four patients with multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154078
Source
Neurology. 2008 Nov 25;71(22):1833-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-25-2008

[4 years of experiences with Karbase. A tool for quality development in vascular surgery].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216878
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Nov 21;156(47):7032-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-21-1994
Author
L P Jensen
T V Schroeder
J E Lorentzen
P V Madsen
Author Affiliation
Karkirurgisk afdeling, Rigshospitalet, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Nov 21;156(47):7032-5
Date
Nov-21-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Registries
Risk factors
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology
Vascular Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Karbase, a Danish register for vascular surgery is presented with data from four years experience. The register consists of 65 variables centered on risk factors, the perioperative course as well as follow-up information. During the four-year period 1989-1992 a total of 4902 admissions were registered in 3810 patients. Surgery was performed during 4005 admissions. Output data from Karbase is presented with results on survival and postoperative complications, related to preoperative risk factors. The incidence of surgical wound infections was 3.9%, with a significant reduction during the years (p = 0.004). Karbase is now used by all vascular surgical units in Denmark. We conclude that the establishment of a continuous registration has been beneficial to the department. We have achieved valid data on treatment, outcome and complications in relation to individual risk factors. In the future the use of Karbase will be extended with the aim of further quality development, locally as well as nation wide.
PubMed ID
7817410 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1997 Oct 10;97(41):6-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-1997

The 6 dimensions of promising practice for case managed supports to end homelessness: part 2: the 6 dimensions of quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129049
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Milaney
Author Affiliation
Calgary Homeless Foundation, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. kmilaney@calgaryhomeless.com
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - statistics & numerical data
Professional Competence
Quality of Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Homelessness is a social condition increasing in frequency and severity across Canada. Interventions to end and prevent homelessness include effective case management in addition to an affordable housing provision. Little standardization exists for service providers to guide their decision making in developing and maintaining effective case management programs. The purpose of this 2-part article is to articulate dimensions of promising practice for case managers working in a "Housing First" context. Part 1 discusses research processes and findings and Part 2 articulates the 6 dimensions of quality.
Practice settings include community-based organizations that employ and support case managers whose primary role is moving people from homelessness into permanent supportive housing.
Six dimensions of promising practice are critically important to reducing barriers, improving sector collaboration, and ensuring that case managers have appropriate and effective training and support. Dimensions of promising practice are (1) collaboration and cooperation-a true team approach; (2) right matching of services-person-centered; (3) contextual case management-culture and flexibility; (4) the right kind of engagement-relationships and advocacy; (5) coordinated and well-managed system-ethics and communication; and (6) evaluation for success-support and training.
Effective, coordinated case management, in addition to permanent affordable housing has the potential to reduce a person's or family's homelessness permanently. Organizations and professionals working in this context have the opportunity to improve processes, reduce burnout, collaborate and standardize, and, most importantly, efficiently and permanently end someone's homelessness with the help of dimensions of quality for case management.
PubMed ID
22146635 View in PubMed
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19608 records – page 1 of 1961.