Skip header and navigation

Refine By

44 records – page 1 of 5.

Academic careers in medical education: perceptions of the effects of a faculty development program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200453
Source
Acad Med. 1999 Oct;74(10 Suppl):S72-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999

The ALIVE program: developing a web-based professional development program for nursing leaders in the home healthcare sector.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143604
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 May;23 Spec No 2010:61-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Sara Lankshear
Sherri Huckstep
Nancy Lefebre
Janis Leiterman
Deborah Simon
Author Affiliation
Relevé Consulting Services.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 May;23 Spec No 2010:61-74
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Data Collection
Educational Technology
Home nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Internet
Leadership
Learning
Nurse Administrators
Nursing Evaluation Research
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Program Development
Questionnaires
Staff Development - methods
Abstract
Home healthcare nurses often work in isolation and rarely have the opportunity to meet or congregate in one location. As a result, nurse leaders must possess unique leadership skills to supervise and manage a dispersed employee base from a distance. The nature of this dispersed workforce creates an additional challenge in the ability to identify future leaders, facilitate leadership capacity, and enhance skill development to prepare them for future leadership positions. The ALIVE (Actively Leading In Virtual Environments) web-based program was developed to meet the needs of leaders working in virtual environments such as the home healthcare sector. The program, developed through a partnership of three home healthcare agencies, used nursing leaders as content experts to guide program development and as participants in the pilot. Evaluation findings include the identification of key competencies for nursing leaders in the home healthcare sector, development of program learning objectives and participant feedback regarding program content and delivery.
PubMed ID
20463446 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Accid Emerg Nurs. 2002 Jan;10(1):10-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
W W H Cheung
L. Heeney
J L Pound
Author Affiliation
Emergency Department, Centenary Health Centre, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Accid Emerg Nurs. 2002 Jan;10(1):10-6
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Canada
Clinical Protocols
Emergency Nursing - education - methods
Humans
Program Development - methods
Program Evaluation
Staff Development - methods
Triage - methods
Abstract
This paper describes the redesign of the triage process in an Emergency Department with the purpose of improving the patient flow and thus increasing patient satisfaction through the reduction of the overall length of stay. The process, Advance Triage, allows the triage nurse to initiate diagnostic protocols for frequently occurring medical problems based on physician-approved algorithms. With staff and physician involvement and medical specialist approval, nine Advance Triage algorithms were developed-abdominal pain, eye trauma, chest pain, gynaecological symptoms, substance abuse, orthopaedic trauma, minor trauma, paediatric fever and paediatric emergent. A comprehensive educational program was provided to the triage nurses and Advance Triage was initiated. A process was established at one year to evaluate the effectiveness of the Advance Triage System. The average length of stay was found to be 46 min less for all patients who were advance triaged with the greatest time-saving of 76 min for patients in the 'Urgent' category. The most significant saving was realized in the patient's length of stay (LOS) after the Emergency Physician assessed them because diagnostic results, available during the initial patient assessment, allowed treatment decisions to be made at that time. Advance Triage utilizes patient waiting time efficiently and increases the nurses' and physicians' job satisfaction.
PubMed ID
11998578 View in PubMed
Less detail

An unwanted visitor. Aggressive infection control strategies are needed to shorten the hospital visit of the easily spread norovirus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176818
Source
Can Nurse. 2004 Nov;100(9):21-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Marilyn K Albers
Author Affiliation
Capital Health Public Health Division, Edmonton, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2004 Nov;100(9):21-6
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Caliciviridae Infections - nursing - prevention & control
Cross Infection - nursing - prevention & control
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Gastroenteritis - nursing - prevention & control
Health Education - methods
Humans
Infection Control - methods - organization & administration
Norovirus
Staff Development - methods
Abstract
Norovirus is the name for a group of Norwalk-like viruses that cause acute gastroenteritis of rapid onset. A recent outbreak at a tertiary care facility in Alberta provided an opportunityfor staff and management to review their outbreak protocol and improve their infection prevention and control procedures. The outbreak caused illness in 32 of 73 exposed patients as well as 42 staff members. None of the infected patients or staff developed complications. The source of norovirus contamination was probably associated with a symptomatic food services staff member serving food cafeteria style in a satellite patient dining room. Food service procedures and serving techniques were reviewed; although no breaks in technique were identified, correct food handling procedures were reviewed with staff. Subsequent patient and staff cases were probably related to the cross contamination of environmental surfaces and patient care equipment. The director of nursing and the infection control practitioner led the investigation and management of the outbreak. An Outbreak Management Committee was also formed to reinforce routine infection prevention practices and implement infection control strategies. Communication strategies for staff, patients and visitors were quickly devised and implemented. Gaps in the outbreak protocol were identified and resolved promptly Four permanent changes were made: the use of alcohol hand rinse in designated locations; the development of a comprehensive e-mail to facilitate site-wide communication; the development of teamwork checklists and accountabilities; and the establishment of criteria for use in outbreak situations to proactively determine essential and non-essential therapies and treatments.
PubMed ID
15623009 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can CME save lives? The results of a Swedish, evidence-based continuing education intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134658
Source
Ann Fam Med. 2011 May-Jun;9(3):198-200
Publication Type
Article
Author
Dave Davis
Source
Ann Fam Med. 2011 May-Jun;9(3):198-200
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular diseases
Clinical Competence
Education, Medical, Continuing
Educational Status
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Patient Care - standards
Risk
Staff Development - methods - standards
Sweden
Notes
Cites: Evid Rep Technol Assess (Full Rep). 2007 Jan;(149):1-6917764217
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Oct 11;362(9391):1225-3014568747
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 Dec;82(6):399-4032291408
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Sep 6;274(9):700-57650822
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2006 Winter;26(1):13-2416557505
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2011 May-Jun;9(3):211-821555748
Cites: Chest. 2009 Mar;135(3 Suppl):8S-16S19265071
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(2):CD00303019370580
Cites: Trials. 2009;10:3719493350
Cites: Chest. 2009 Sep;136(3):947-819736208
Comment On: Ann Fam Med. 2011 May-Jun;9(3):211-821555748
PubMed ID
21555746 View in PubMed
Less detail

Challenges in transferring individual learning to organizational learning in the residential care of older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108467
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2013;27(3):390-408
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Hanna Augustsson
Agneta Törnquist
Henna Hasson
Author Affiliation
Medical Management Centre, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2013;27(3):390-408
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Homes for the Aged - manpower - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Inservice Training - methods
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Educational
Models, organizational
Palliative Care - methods - standards
Problem-Based Learning - methods
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Staff Development - methods - standards
Sweden
Teaching - methods
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the outcomes of a workplace learning intervention on organizational learning and to identify factors influencing the creation of organizational learning in residential care of older people.
The study consisted of a quasi-experimental intervention for outcome evaluation. In addition, a case study design was used to identify factors influencing organizational learning. Outcomes were evaluated using the validated Dimensions of the Learning Organization Questionnaire at three time points, and interviews were conducted with nursing staff and managers.
The intervention had some effects on the individual level, but no improvements in organizational learning were found. Hindering factors for creating organizational learning were poor initial learning climate, managers' uncertainty about their role, lack of ownership and responsibility among staff and managers, managers' views of personality being a more important component than staff development in older people's care, and a lack of systems for capturing acquired knowledge.
The study offers suggestions for the transfer of individual-level learning to organizational learning in older people's care.
PubMed ID
23885400 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community pharmacists as educators in Danish residential facilities: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291049
Source
Int J Pharm Pract. 2017 Aug; 25(4):282-291
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Anna Mygind
Mira El-Souri
Kirsten Pultz
Charlotte Rossing
Linda A Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Pharmakon, Danish College for Pharmacy Practice, Hillerød, Denmark.
Source
Int J Pharm Pract. 2017 Aug; 25(4):282-291
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Community Pharmacy Services - organization & administration
Denmark
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Intersectoral Collaboration
Learning
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Patient Safety
Pharmacists - psychology
Professional Role
Qualitative Research
Residential Facilities - organization & administration
Staff Development - methods
Surveys and Questionnaires
Work Engagement
Abstract
To explore experiences with engaging community pharmacists in educational programmes on quality and safety in medication handling in residential facilities for the disabled.
A secondary analysis of data from two Danish intervention studies where community pharmacists were engaged in educational programmes. Data included 10 semi-structured interviews with staff, five semi-structured interviews and three open-ended questionnaires with residential facility managers, and five open-ended questionnaires to community pharmacists. Data were thematically coded to identify key points pertaining to the themes 'pharmacists as educators' and 'perceived effects of engaging pharmacists in competence development'.
As educators, pharmacists were successful as medicines experts. Some pharmacists experienced pedagogical challenges. Previous teaching experience and obtained knowledge of the local residential facility before teaching often provided sufficient pedagogical skills and tailored teaching to local needs. Effects of engaging community pharmacists included in most instances improved cooperation between residential facilities and community pharmacies through a trustful relationship and improved dialogue about the residents' medication. Other effects included a perception of improved patient safety, teaching skills and branding of the pharmacy.
Community pharmacists provide a resource to engage in educational programmes on medication handling in residential facilities, which may facilitate improved cooperation between community pharmacies and residential facilities. However, development of pedagogical competences and understandings of local settings are prerequisites for facilities and pharmacists to experience the programmes as successful.
PubMed ID
27632944 View in PubMed
Less detail

Creating supports for rural nursing practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176729
Source
Nurs BC. 2004 Dec;36(5):27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Cathy Ulrich
Tom Fulton
Martha MacLeod
Author Affiliation
Clinical Services, Northern Health Authority, British Columbia.
Source
Nurs BC. 2004 Dec;36(5):27
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
British Columbia
Humans
Nurse's Role
Nursing Staff - organization & administration
Rural health services - organization & administration
Staff Development - methods
PubMed ID
15633526 View in PubMed
Less detail

Developing an orientation toolkit for new public health nurse hires for Ontario's changing landscape of public health practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143601
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 May;23 Spec No 2010:113-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Jane Simpson
Susan Kniahnicki
Karen Quigley-Hobbs
Author Affiliation
ANDSOOHA Project Lead, Kanata, ON. Jane.simpson@sympatico.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 May;23 Spec No 2010:113-24
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Cooperative Behavior
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Inservice Training - methods
Leadership
Learning
Nursing Evaluation Research
Ontario
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Program Development
Public Health Nursing - education - standards
Public Health Practice - standards
Staff Development - methods
Abstract
In 2008/2009, the Orientation: Transition to Public Health Nursing Toolkit was developed to enhance the integration of new hires into public health nursing practice in Ontario and to increase retention of these hires. The changing landscape of public health in Canada, such as the introduction of new standards and competencies, presents challenges to leaders orienting staff to public health nursing. The toolkit was designed to provide a standardized general orientation, involving a broad range of public health knowledge and issues. Through the use of technology, a virtual network of public health nurses, educators, managers, senior nurse leaders and nursing professors from various areas of Ontario designed, implemented and evaluated the toolkit. Three modules were developed: foundations of practice (e.g., core competencies, national and provincial standards, public health legislation), the role of the public health nurse, and developing partnerships and relationships. Evaluations demonstrated that the toolkit was useful to new hires adjusting to public health nursing. It has had significant uptake within Canada and is well accepted by public health nursing leaders for use in Ontario's health units.
PubMed ID
20463450 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of IMAGINE: a three-pillar student initiative to promote social accountability and interprofessional education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131509
Source
J Interprof Care. 2011 Nov;25(6):454-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011

44 records – page 1 of 5.