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190 records – page 1 of 19.

Academic careers in medical education: perceptions of the effects of a faculty development program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200453
Source
Acad Med. 1999 Oct;74(10 Suppl):S72-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999

Achieving clinical improvement: an interdisciplinary intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187771
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2002;27(4):42-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Diane M Irvine Doran
G Ross Baker
Michael Murray
John Bohnen
Catherine Zahn
Souraya Sidani
Jennifer Carryer
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2002;27(4):42-56
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Group Processes
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Urban - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Team - standards
Problem Solving
Staff Development
Total Quality Management
Abstract
This study evaluates whether training health care teams in continuous quality improvement methods results in improvements in the care of and outcomes for patients. Nine of the 25 teams who participated in the study were successful in improving the care/outcomes for patients. Successful teams were more effective at problem solving, engaged in more functional group interactions, and were more likely to have physician participation.
PubMed ID
12433246 View in PubMed
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Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: the Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146049
Source
Addiction. 2010 Feb;105(2):207-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Tim Stockwell
Dan Reist
Scott Macdonald
Cecilia Benoit
Mikael Jansson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia, University of Victoria, BC, Canada.
Source
Addiction. 2010 Feb;105(2):207-15
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - economics - organization & administration
British Columbia
Creativity
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Program Development - economics - methods
Staff Development
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
The Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia (CARBC) was established as a multi-campus and multi-disciplinary research centre administered by the University of Victoria (UVic) in late 2003. Its core funding is provided from interest payments on an endowment of CAD 10.55 million dollars. It is supported by a commitment to seven faculty appointments in various departments at UVic. The Centre has two offices, an administration and research office in Victoria and a knowledge exchange unit in Vancouver. The two offices are collaborating on the implementation of CARBC's first 5-year plan which seeks to build capacity in British Columbia for integrated multi-disciplinary research and knowledge exchange in the areas substance use, addictions and harm reduction. Present challenges include losses to the endowment caused by the 2008/2009 economic crisis and difficulties negotiating faculty positions with the university administration. Despite these hurdles, to date each year has seen increased capacity for the Centre in terms of affiliated scientists, funding and staffing as well as output in terms of published reports, electronic resources and impacts on policy and practice. Areas of special research interest include: drug testing in the work-place, epidemiological monitoring, substance use and injury, pricing and taxation policies, privatization of liquor monopolies, polysubstance use, health determinants of indigenous peoples, street-involved youth and other vulnerable populations at risk of substance use problems. Further information about the Centre and its activities can be found on http://www.carbc.ca.
PubMed ID
20078479 View in PubMed
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Aligning career development with organizational goals: working towards the development of a strong and sustainable workforce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152039
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(1):56-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Marcy Saxe-Braithwaite
Sandra Carlton
Brenda Bass
Author Affiliation
Programs and Chief Nursing Officer, Providence Care, Kingston, ON, Canada. saxebram@providencecare.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(1):56-69
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Career Mobility
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Forecasting
Health Personnel - education - trends
Health Promotion - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Personnel Loyalty
Pilot Projects
Social Change
Staff Development - trends
Abstract
The rapidly changing world of healthcare is faced with many challenges, not the least of which is a diminishing workforce. Healthcare organizations must develop multiple strategies, not only to attract and retain employees, but also to ensure that workers are prepared for continuous change in the workplace, are working at their full scope of practice and are committed to, and accountable for, the provision of high-quality care. There is evidence that by creating a healthier workplace, improved patient care will follow. Aligning Healthy Workplace Initiatives with an organization's strategic goals, corporate culture and vision reinforces their importance within the organization. In this paper, we describe an innovative pilot to assess a career development program, one of multiple Healthy Workplace Initiatives taking place at Providence Care in Kingston, Ontario in support of our three strategic goals. The results of the pilot were very encouraging; subsequent success in obtaining funding from HealthForceOntario has allowed the implementation of a sustainable program of career development within the organization. More work is required to evaluate its long-term effectiveness.
PubMed ID
19289913 View in PubMed
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The ALIVE program: developing a web-based professional development program for nursing leaders in the home healthcare sector.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143604
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 May;23 Spec No 2010:61-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Sara Lankshear
Sherri Huckstep
Nancy Lefebre
Janis Leiterman
Deborah Simon
Author Affiliation
Relevé Consulting Services.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 May;23 Spec No 2010:61-74
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Data Collection
Educational Technology
Home nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Internet
Leadership
Learning
Nurse Administrators
Nursing Evaluation Research
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Program Development
Questionnaires
Staff Development - methods
Abstract
Home healthcare nurses often work in isolation and rarely have the opportunity to meet or congregate in one location. As a result, nurse leaders must possess unique leadership skills to supervise and manage a dispersed employee base from a distance. The nature of this dispersed workforce creates an additional challenge in the ability to identify future leaders, facilitate leadership capacity, and enhance skill development to prepare them for future leadership positions. The ALIVE (Actively Leading In Virtual Environments) web-based program was developed to meet the needs of leaders working in virtual environments such as the home healthcare sector. The program, developed through a partnership of three home healthcare agencies, used nursing leaders as content experts to guide program development and as participants in the pilot. Evaluation findings include the identification of key competencies for nursing leaders in the home healthcare sector, development of program learning objectives and participant feedback regarding program content and delivery.
PubMed ID
20463446 View in PubMed
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Source
Accid Emerg Nurs. 2002 Jan;10(1):10-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
W W H Cheung
L. Heeney
J L Pound
Author Affiliation
Emergency Department, Centenary Health Centre, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Accid Emerg Nurs. 2002 Jan;10(1):10-6
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Canada
Clinical Protocols
Emergency Nursing - education - methods
Humans
Program Development - methods
Program Evaluation
Staff Development - methods
Triage - methods
Abstract
This paper describes the redesign of the triage process in an Emergency Department with the purpose of improving the patient flow and thus increasing patient satisfaction through the reduction of the overall length of stay. The process, Advance Triage, allows the triage nurse to initiate diagnostic protocols for frequently occurring medical problems based on physician-approved algorithms. With staff and physician involvement and medical specialist approval, nine Advance Triage algorithms were developed-abdominal pain, eye trauma, chest pain, gynaecological symptoms, substance abuse, orthopaedic trauma, minor trauma, paediatric fever and paediatric emergent. A comprehensive educational program was provided to the triage nurses and Advance Triage was initiated. A process was established at one year to evaluate the effectiveness of the Advance Triage System. The average length of stay was found to be 46 min less for all patients who were advance triaged with the greatest time-saving of 76 min for patients in the 'Urgent' category. The most significant saving was realized in the patient's length of stay (LOS) after the Emergency Physician assessed them because diagnostic results, available during the initial patient assessment, allowed treatment decisions to be made at that time. Advance Triage utilizes patient waiting time efficiently and increases the nurses' and physicians' job satisfaction.
PubMed ID
11998578 View in PubMed
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An unwanted visitor. Aggressive infection control strategies are needed to shorten the hospital visit of the easily spread norovirus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176818
Source
Can Nurse. 2004 Nov;100(9):21-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Marilyn K Albers
Author Affiliation
Capital Health Public Health Division, Edmonton, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2004 Nov;100(9):21-6
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Caliciviridae Infections - nursing - prevention & control
Cross Infection - nursing - prevention & control
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Gastroenteritis - nursing - prevention & control
Health Education - methods
Humans
Infection Control - methods - organization & administration
Norovirus
Staff Development - methods
Abstract
Norovirus is the name for a group of Norwalk-like viruses that cause acute gastroenteritis of rapid onset. A recent outbreak at a tertiary care facility in Alberta provided an opportunityfor staff and management to review their outbreak protocol and improve their infection prevention and control procedures. The outbreak caused illness in 32 of 73 exposed patients as well as 42 staff members. None of the infected patients or staff developed complications. The source of norovirus contamination was probably associated with a symptomatic food services staff member serving food cafeteria style in a satellite patient dining room. Food service procedures and serving techniques were reviewed; although no breaks in technique were identified, correct food handling procedures were reviewed with staff. Subsequent patient and staff cases were probably related to the cross contamination of environmental surfaces and patient care equipment. The director of nursing and the infection control practitioner led the investigation and management of the outbreak. An Outbreak Management Committee was also formed to reinforce routine infection prevention practices and implement infection control strategies. Communication strategies for staff, patients and visitors were quickly devised and implemented. Gaps in the outbreak protocol were identified and resolved promptly Four permanent changes were made: the use of alcohol hand rinse in designated locations; the development of a comprehensive e-mail to facilitate site-wide communication; the development of teamwork checklists and accountabilities; and the establishment of criteria for use in outbreak situations to proactively determine essential and non-essential therapies and treatments.
PubMed ID
15623009 View in PubMed
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Applying the balanced scorecard to local public health performance measurement: deliberations and decisions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151095
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:127
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Erica Weir
Nadine d'Entremont
Shelley Stalker
Karim Kurji
Victoria Robinson
Author Affiliation
Public Health Branch, Community and Health Services Department, Regional Municipality of York, Newmarket, Canada. erica.weir@york.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:127
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Management Audit - methods
Ontario
Public Health - methods - standards
Public Health Administration - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods - organization & administration
Staff Development
Abstract
All aspects of the heath care sector are being asked to account for their performance. This poses unique challenges for local public health units with their traditional focus on population health and their emphasis on disease prevention, health promotion and protection. Reliance on measures of health status provides an imprecise and partial picture of the performance of a health unit. In 2004 the provincial Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences based in Ontario, Canada introduced a public-health specific balanced scorecard framework. We present the conceptual deliberations and decisions undertaken by a health unit while adopting the framework.
Posing, pondering and answering key questions assisted in applying the framework and developing indicators. Questions such as: Who should be involved in developing performance indicators? What level of performance should be measured? Who is the primary intended audience? Where and how do we begin? What types of indicators should populate the health status and determinants quadrant? What types of indicators should populate the resources and services quadrant? What type of indicators should populate the community engagement quadrant? What types of indicators should populate the integration and responsiveness quadrants? Should we try to link the quadrants? What comparators do we use? How do we move from a baseline report card to a continuous quality improvement management tool?
An inclusive, participatory process was chosen for defining and creating indicators to populate the four quadrants. Examples of indicators that populate the four quadrants of the scorecard are presented and key decisions are highlighted that facilitated the process.
Notes
Cites: J Health Organ Manag. 2006;20(4):335-4316921817
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2003 Sep-Oct;94(5):391-614577752
Cites: Healthc Q. 2008;11(2):52-6, 218362520
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2008 Mar-Apr;99(2):8518457277
PubMed ID
19426508 View in PubMed
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Are stipulated requirements for the quality of maternity care complied with?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287789
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2017 09 19;137(17)
Publication Type
Article
Date
09-19-2017
Author
Lars T Johansen
Aase Serine Devold Pay
Lise Broen
Brit Roland
Pål Øian
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2017 09 19;137(17)
Date
09-19-2017
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birthing Centers - manpower - organization & administration - standards
Clinical Competence
Delivery Rooms - manpower - organization & administration - standards
Delivery, Obstetric - standards
Female
Fetal Monitoring - standards
Guideline Adherence
Hospitals - manpower - standards
Hospitals, Maternity - manpower - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Midwifery - manpower
Norway
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - manpower - organization & administration - standards
Patient Selection
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - standards
Physicians
Pregnancy
Quality of Health Care - standards
Risk assessment
Staff Development
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The Directorate of Health’s national guide Et trygt fødetilbud – kvalitetskrav til fødselsomsorgen [A safe maternity service – requirements regarding the quality of maternity care] was published in December 2010 and was intended to provide a basis for an improved and more predictable maternity service. This article presents data from the maternity institutions on compliance with the quality requirements, including information on selection, fetal monitoring, organisation, staffing and competencies.
The information was acquired with the aid of an electronic questionnaire in the period January–May 2015. The form was sent by e-mail to the medical officer in charge at all maternity units in Norway as at 1 January 2015 (n=47).
There was a 100?% response to the questionnaire. The criteria for selecting where pregnant women should give birth were stated to be in conformity with the quality requirements. Some maternity institutions failed to describe the areas of responsibilities of doctors and midwives (38.5?% and 15.4?%, respectively). Few institutions recorded whether the midwife was present with the patient during the active phase. Half of the maternity departments (level 2 birth units) reported unfilled doctors’ posts, and a third of the university hospitals/central hospitals (level 1 birth units) reported a severe shortage of locum midwives. Half of the level 2 birth units believed that the quality requirements had resulted in improved training, but reported only a limited degree of interdisciplinary or mandatory instruction.
The study reveals that there are several areas in which the health enterprises have procedures that conform to national quality requirements, but where it is still unclear whether they are observed in practice. Areas for improvement relate to routines describing areas of responsibility, availability of personnel resources and staff training.
PubMed ID
28925199 View in PubMed
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Assessing non-conveyed patients in the ambulance service: a phenomenological interview study with Swedish ambulance clinicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309857
Source
BMJ Open. 2019 09 24; 9(9):e030203
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-24-2019
Author
Jakob Lederman
Caroline Löfvenmark
Therese Djärv
Veronica Lindström
Carina Elmqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden jakob.lederman@ki.se.
Source
BMJ Open. 2019 09 24; 9(9):e030203
Date
09-24-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Ambulances
Clinical Competence - standards
Clinical Decision-Making - methods
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration - standards
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Medical Overuse - prevention & control
Nurse Specialists - education - standards
Quality Improvement
Risk Management - organization & administration
Staff Development - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Symptom Assessment - methods - standards
Triage - methods
Abstract
To combat overcrowding in emergency departments, ambulance clinicians (ACs) are being encouraged to make on-site assessments regarding patients' need for conveyance to hospital, and this is creating new and challenging demands for ACs. This study aimed to describe ACs' experiences of assessing non-conveyed patients.
A phenomenological interview study based on a reflective lifeworld research approach.
The target area for the study was Stockholm, Sweden, which has a population of approximately 2.3?million inhabitants. In this area, 73 ambulances perform approximately just over 200?000 ambulance assignments annually, and approximately 25?000 patients are non-conveyed each year.
11 ACs.
In-depth open-ended interviews.
ACs experience uncertainty regarding the accuracy of their assessments of non-conveyed patients. In particular, they fear conducting erroneous assessments that could harm patients. Avoiding hasty decisions is important for conducting safe patient assessments. Several challenging paradoxes were identified that complicate the non-conveyance situation, namely; responsibility, education and feedback paradoxes. The core of the responsibility paradox is that the increased responsibility associated with non-conveyance assessments is not accompanied with appropriate organisational support. Thus, frustration is experienced. The education paradox involves limited and inadequate non-conveyance education. This, in combination with limited support from non-conveyance guidelines, causes the clinical reality to be perceived as challenging and problematic. Finally, the feedback paradox relates to the obstruction of professional development as a result of an absence of learning possibilities after assessments. Additionally, ACs also described loneliness during non-conveyance situations.
This study suggests that, for ACs, performing non-conveyance assessments means experiencing a paradoxical professional existence. Despite these aggravating paradoxes, however, complex non-conveyance assessments continue to be performed and accompanied with limited organisational support. To create more favourable circumstances and, hopefully, safer assessments, further studies that focus on these paradoxes and non-conveyance are needed.
PubMed ID
31551383 View in PubMed
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190 records – page 1 of 19.