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Cultural dissimilarity and intermarriage. a longitudinal study of immigrants in Sweden, 1990–2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129785
Source
Int Migr Rev. 2011;45(2):297-324
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Martin Dribe
Christer Lundh
Author Affiliation
Lund University.
Source
Int Migr Rev. 2011;45(2):297-324
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Diversity
Emigrants and Immigrants - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Marriage - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Social Conditions - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Identification
Social Values - ethnology - history
Spouses - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
Intermarriage with natives is a key indicator of immigrant integration. This article studies intermarriage for 138 immigrant groups in Sweden, using longitudinal individual level data. It shows great variation in marriage patterns across immigrant populations, ranging from over 70 percent endogamy in some immigrants groups to below 5 percent in other groups. Although part of this variation is explained by human capital and the structure of the marriage market, cultural factors (values, religion, and language) play an important role as well. Immigrants from culturally more dissimilar countries are less likely to intermarry with natives, and instead more prone to endogamy.
PubMed ID
22069769 View in PubMed
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A life-course approach to studying transitions among Canadian seniors in couple-only households.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133005
Source
Can Public Policy. 2011;37(Suppl):S57-S71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Lisa Strohschein
Source
Can Public Policy. 2011;37(Suppl):S57-S71
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - ethnology
Family Relations - ethnology - legislation & jurisprudence
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Housekeeping - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Institutionalization - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Life Change Events - history
Marriage - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Residence Characteristics - history
Retirement - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors - history
Spouses - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Widowhood - economics - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
This study tracked the occurrence of death, widowhood, institutionalization, and coresidence with others between 1994 and 2002 for a nationally representative sample of 1,580 Canadian respondents who, at initial interview, were aged 55 and older and living in a couple-only household. Although the majority of seniors remained in a couple-only household throughout the duration of the survey, nearly one in four who experienced a first transition underwent one or more subsequent transitions. Age, economic resources, and health were significant predictors of a specific first transition and multiple transitions. More work is needed to understand the dynamics of the aging process.
PubMed ID
21751485 View in PubMed
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Status homogamy in the preindustrial marriage market: partner selection according to age, social origin, and place of birth in nineteenth-century rural Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146798
Source
J Fam Hist. 2009 Oct;34(4):387-406
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Martin Dribe
Christer Lundh
Author Affiliation
Lund Univ., Sweden; Univ. of Gothenburg, Sweden
Source
J Fam Hist. 2009 Oct;34(4):387-406
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Networks - economics - history
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Family Health - ethnology
Family Relations - ethnology - legislation & jurisprudence
History, 19th Century
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Marriage - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Minority Groups - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Social Behavior
Social Class - history
Social Conditions - economics - history
Spouses - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
This article studies partner selection according to three dimensions: social origin, age, and place of birth. The authors use micro-level data from local population registers in five parishes in southern Sweden from 1815 to 1895. The results confirm that all three aspects were important but that socioeconomic status was the most important characteristic, structuring much of the selection process. The importance of social and age homogamy remained stable over the period, while geographic exogamy became more frequent, which could be interpreted in terms of an increasing openness of rural society. The authors also find some indications of exchange of characteristics in the partner selection process.
PubMed ID
19999643 View in PubMed
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