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A 5-year follow-up study of 117 battered women

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68577
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1991 Nov;81(11):1486-1489
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
  1 website  
Author
Bergman, B
Brismar, B
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Huddinge Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1991 Nov;81(11):1486-1489
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Marriage
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Spouse Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper reports register data concerning somatic and psychiatric hospital care on 117 battered women who were identified in a surgical emergency department and offered a treatment program. Data were collected during a period of 10 years before to 5 years after the battering in question. It was concluded that the battered woman seeks hospital care much more than the average woman of the same age. It is, however, not only traumatic injuries that bring her to the hospital, but also medical, gynecological, psychiatric, and unspecified disorders and suicide attempts. In this study it was hypothesized that this overuse of hospital care reflects the situation at home characterized by ongoing battering and other psychosocial problems. During the 5 years following the battering, the women did not show any signs of reducing their use of hospital care. It is alarming that this high use of medical care continues over years, and doctors should consider battering as one possible explanation for this phenomenon.
PubMed ID
1951810 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Gynaecological impact of sexual and physical abuse by spouse. A study of a random sample of Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75361
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1989 Dec;96(12):1379-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
B. Schei
L S Bakketeig
Author Affiliation
University of Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1989 Dec;96(12):1379-83
Date
Dec-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Genital Diseases, Female - etiology
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Norway - epidemiology
Random Allocation
Rape
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological - etiology
Spouse Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Violence
Abstract
A sample of 150 women aged between 20 and 49 was randomly selected from the census of the city of Trondheim, Norway. Of the 131 eligible for the study, 13 refused to participate; the participating 118 women were interviewed by a gynaecologist. Detailed information about their present and previous spouse(s) and about sexual problems and gynaecological symptoms was obtained. Physical abuse by spouse had occurred in 20 (18%) of the 111 women who had ever lived in a relationship, and sexual abuse in 19 (17%). Eleven (10%) had experienced both physical and sexual abuse. A history of physical abuse with or without sexual abuse by spouse was associated with sexual problems in the present or in previous relationships. Reported abuse by spouse was also associated with a higher frequency of gynaecological symptoms at the time of interview.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1989 Dec;96(12):1367-92620048
PubMed ID
2620049 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of sexual abuse history in a random sample of Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75360
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1990;18(1):63-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
B. Schei
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, University of Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1990;18(1):63-8
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Abuse, Sexual - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Prevalence
Random Allocation
Rape - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Spouse Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
In order to obtain an estimate of the prevalence of sexual abuse history among adult women, data from a gynecological interview of a random sample of 118 women aged between 20-49 were analysed. Childhood sexual abuse involving genital contact was reported by 8.5% of the women. Intrafamilial sexual abuse in childhood was reported by 7%, 10% of all women who had ever lived in a relationship reported sexual abuse by a violent spouse, additionally 7% had experienced sexual abuse by a non-violent spouse. 5% of all women had experienced adult sexual abuse by other than their spouse. Sexual abuse in childhood and by violent spouse was associated with a history of psychological problems and of suicidal ideation or attempts.
PubMed ID
2320979 View in PubMed
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Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1991 May;83(5):380-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1991
Author
B. Bergman
B. Brismar
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1991 May;83(5):380-4
Date
May-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Overdose - epidemiology - psychology
Psychotropic Drugs - poisoning
Risk factors
Spouse Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
During an 8-month period a total of 117 battered wives, all seeking emergency surgical care, were identified. Twenty-two of the battered wives were found to have made 82 suicide attempts during the 16-year study period. This corresponds to an incidence more than 8 times that of an unselected population of women being treated because of attempted suicide in the same hospital. The suicide attempts were predominately passive methods. Although conflict with the husband was the most common triggering factor for the attempt, mental disorder of the woman was another main cause. It is concluded that the doctor, when confronted with a patient who has attempted suicide, always should consider the possibility of ongoing physical abuse. Although battering generally is not the only explanation, the physician should remember this possibility and the patient should, if necessary, be referred to proper care services.
PubMed ID
1853731 View in PubMed
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