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Characteristics of sex-related homicides in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143245
Source
J Forensic Nurs. 2010;6(2):57-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Tara Henry
Author Affiliation
Forensic Nurse Services, Anchorage, AK 99516, USA. thenry@alaska.net
Source
J Forensic Nurs. 2010;6(2):57-65
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Alaska - epidemiology
Anal Canal - injuries
Autopsy - instrumentation - methods
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Colposcopes
Female
Forensic Nursing - instrumentation - methods
Genitalia, Female - injuries
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Nursing Assessment
Physical Examination - instrumentation - methods - nursing
Postmortem Changes
Rape - diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Spouse Abuse - diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The identification and interpretation of anogenital findings postmortem is a critical component of a sex-related homicide investigation. The use of a colposcope to assist in identifying anogenital injuries in living sexual assault victims is well established. The use of a colposcope for postmortem anogenital examination has been briefly mentioned in a few publications, however, no studies were found regarding the types and sites of postmortem anogenital injuries identified with a colposcope in sex-related homicide cases. The purpose of this study was to describe the demographic, physical examination, and victim-suspect relationship characteristics of sex-related homicides in Alaska. Genital findings in living and deceased sexual assault victims in Alaska were compared.
Given the results of this study, postmortem sexual assault examinations should be conducted in all suspected intimate partner homicides. Further implications for forensic nursing practice and recommendations for future research are discussed.
PubMed ID
20507418 View in PubMed
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Domestic violence screening rates in a community health center urgent care clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160268
Source
Res Nurs Health. 2007 Dec;30(6):611-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Wilfreda E Thurston
Leslie M Tutty
Amanda E Eisener
Lise Lalonde
Cathie Belenky
Belinda Osborne
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Canada.
Source
Res Nurs Health. 2007 Dec;30(6):611-9
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Domestic Violence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Treatment - nursing
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Nursing Assessment
Research Design
Spouse Abuse - diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We describe the screening rates obtained in the first year of implementation of a universal domestic violence screening protocol by nurses in the urgent care clinic of a Canadian community health center. Rates were calculated using data extracted from electronic patient health records, and a random patient chart pull. Qualitative methods provided additional information. Screening rates were considerably higher and were maintained longer than those recorded in similar settings reported in the literature. Leadership, including monitoring of documentation rates, was key to maintaining higher than average rates. Asking all patients in urgent care settings about domestic violence may improve overall screening rates and play an important role in public education.
PubMed ID
18022814 View in PubMed
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The high risk of IPV against Canadian women with disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157498
Source
Med Sci Monit. 2008 May;14(5):PH27-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Douglas A Brownridge
Janice Ristock
Diane Hiebert-Murphy
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Social Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. douglas_brownridge@umanitoba.ca
Source
Med Sci Monit. 2008 May;14(5):PH27-32
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Battered Women - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Comorbidity
Disabled Persons
Female
Humans
Jealousy
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk
Spouse Abuse - diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Violence
Abstract
Mounting evidence suggests that women with disabilities have a particularly high risk of experiencing violence by an intimate partner. This study examined the elevated risk for male-female intimate partner violence (IPV) against women with disabilities compared to women without disabilities across three large-scale Canadian surveys. An explanatory framework was tested that organized risk markers based on whether they referred to the context of the relationship between the couple (relationship factors), the victim (victim-related characteristics), or the perpetrator (perpetrator-related characteristics).
The data employed in this study were from three surveys collected by Statistics Canada: the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, and the 1999 and 2004 iterations of the General Social Survey. Descriptive analyses consisted of cross-tabulations with Chi-square tests of significance. Logistic regression was used to calculate zero-order odds ratios and to perform multivariate analyses.
A pattern was found in which women with disabilities reported a significantly higher prevalence of violence than those without disabilities. The perpetrator-related characteristics were the only variables that reduced the elevated odds of violence against women with disabilities. Partners of women with disabilities were more likely to engage in patriarchal domination as well as possessive and jealous behaviors.
The apparent importance of perpetrator-related characteristics (e.g., jealousy) suggests that future research should include a focus on what it is about the context of disability that makes these men more likely to engage in behaviors that are associated with IPV perpetration. Population-based efforts, professionals working with women who are victims, and professionals working with male perpetrators need to pay attention to the role of disability in IPV.
PubMed ID
18443559 View in PubMed
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MDs have key role in bringing ugly secret of wife abuse out of closet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207142
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Dec 1;157(11):1579-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1997
Author
N. Baer
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Dec 1;157(11):1579-81
Date
Dec-1-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Physician-Patient Relations
Spouse Abuse - diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1997 Dec 1;157(11):1539-409400408
PubMed ID
9400416 View in PubMed
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Screening for intimate partner violence in orthopedic patients: a comparison of three screening tools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130587
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2012 Mar;27(5):881-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Sheila Sprague
Kim Madden
Sonia Dosanjh
Brad Petrisor
Emil H Schemitsch
Mohit Bhandari
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2012 Mar;27(5):881-98
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fractures, Bone - psychology
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Orthopedics
Physical Examination - methods
Prevalence
Psychological Tests - standards - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Sensitivity and specificity
Spouse Abuse - diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Accurately identifying victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) can be a challenge for clinicians and clinical researchers. Multiple instruments have been developed and validated to identify IPV in patients presenting to health care practitioners, including the Woman Abuse Screening Tool (WAST) and the Partner Violence Screen (PVS). The purpose of the current study is to determine if female patients attending an outpatient orthopaedic fracture clinic who screen positive for IPV using three direct questions (direct questioning) also screen positive on the WAST and PVS. We conducted a prevalence study at two Level I trauma centres to determine the prevalence of IPV in female patients presenting to orthopaedic fracture clinics for treatment of injuries. We used three methods to determine the prevalence of IPV; 1) direct questioning, 2) WAST, and 3) PVS. We compared the prevalence rates across the three screening tools. Ninety-four women screened positive for IPV using any method. The prevalence of IPV was 30.5% when a direct questioning approach was utilized, 12.4% using the WAST, and 9.2% using the PVS. The WAST identified 37.2% (35/94) of the IPV victims detected and the PVS identified 27.7% (53/94) of the IPV victims detected, whereas direct questioning identified 89.4% of the IPV victims. Identification of IPV may be under-estimated by the WAST and PVS screening tools. Our findings suggest direct questioning may increase the frequency of disclosure of IPV among women attending outpatient orthopaedic clinics.
PubMed ID
21987513 View in PubMed
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Validation of the Abuse Screening Inventory (ASI).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77577
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2007;35(3):330-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Swahnberg Katarina
Wijma Klaas
Author Affiliation
Division of Gender and Medicine, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2007;35(3):330-4
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Battered Women
Female
Humans
Interviews
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Psychometrics - methods - standards
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouse Abuse - diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS: To assess the test-retest reliability and concurrent validity of the Abuse Screening Inventory (ASI) in a female sample. METHOD: The ASI comprises 16 items concerning four kinds of abuse: psychological, physical, and sexual abuse, and abuse in healthcare. A randomized sample of 699 women answered the ASI once. Six months later 53 of them answered the ASI again and were interviewed. To assess concurrent validity, answers in the interviews were considered as the gold standard and the ASI as the diagnostic test. RESULTS: The ASI presented good overall test-retest reliability ranging from 81% to 96% for separate items. The ASI separated very well abused from non-abused women. No false positive answers were found. Sensitivity ranged from 72% to 82% for items concerning abuse. CONCLUSION: The ASI is a short abuse screening questionnaire that had acceptable validity and test-retest reliability in a random female Swedish sample.
PubMed ID
17530556 View in PubMed
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Violence against pregnant women in Northwestern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165948
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2006 Nov;1087:320-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Josephine C H Tan
Kathryn V Gregor
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, P7B 5E1 Canada. jtan@lakeheadu.ca
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2006 Nov;1087:320-38
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Battered Women - statistics & numerical data
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health status
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Power (Psychology)
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Care - methods
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouse Abuse - diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Violence against women during pregnancy is a global problem with adverse outcomes for the mothers and their children. This paper provides a discussion of the prevalence rates of pregnancy-related violence, associated factors, and outcomes. Most of the outcome literature focuses on perinatal and postnatal outcomes, but little is known about the longer term psychological outcome of children born to women abused during pregnancy. Moreover, the question as to whether the abuse increases during pregnancy remains unanswered given the equivocal findings in the literature. Findings from a small study conducted with women in the region of northwestern Ontario, Canada, are presented. The pattern of abuse during pregnancy over the three trimesters was examined. The long-term psychological outcomes of the children born to women abused during pregnancy were also investigated by comparing these children to a sex- and age-matched cohort of children born to women who were not abused during pregnancy. Although key confounding variables were controlled in the study, the results still showed that children born to women abused during pregnancy had greater behavioral problems.
PubMed ID
17189514 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.