Skip header and navigation

Refine By

443 records – page 1 of 45.

[A 49 year old male with a giant pulmonary bulla--a case report and review of the literature]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91438
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Oct;94(10):673-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Asgeirsson Hilmar
Lúdvíksdóttir Dóra
Kjartansson Olafur
Gudbjartsson Tómas
Author Affiliation
Landspítala, Hringbraut, Reykjavik.
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Oct;94(10):673-7
Date
Oct-2008
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blister - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Humans
Lung - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Lung Diseases - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Lung Volume Measurements
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy
Radiography, Thoracic
Spirometry
Thoracotomy
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A 49 year old previously healthy smoker was diagnosed with a giant bulla in his right lung, following a history of dry cough, repeated upper airway infections and increasing dyspnea for several years. Computed tomography (CT) confirmed the presence of a giant bulla in the right inferior lobe and several smaller bullae in the right superior lobe. The giant bulla was 17 cm in diameter, occupying more than half of the right hemithorax. On spirometry a moderate restrictive and a mild obstructive pattern was observed. Lung volume was measured with two different techniques, nitrogen washout and plethysmography, with volume of the bullae estimated at 2.9 L, similar to the 3.2 L determined by CT. The patient underwent thoracotomy, where the giant bulla together with the inferior lobe were removed with lobectomy and the small bullae in the superior lobe with wedge resection. Five months postoperatively the patient is in good health and is back at work. Postoperatively significant improvements in spirometry values and lung volume measurements have been documented. This case demonstrates that giant bullae can be successfully managed with surgical resection and their size can be determined by different techniques, including lung volume measurements and chest CT.
PubMed ID
18974430 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acclimatization to cold in man induced by frequent scuba diving in cold water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293858
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1968 Feb;24(2):177-81.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968

Acute asthma: emergency department management and prospective evaluation of outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229449
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Mar 15;142(6):591-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1990
Author
J M Fitzgerald
F E Hargreave
Author Affiliation
Firestone Regional Chest and Allergy Unit, St. Joseph's Hospital, Hamilton, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Mar 15;142(6):591-5
Date
Mar-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Adult
Asthma - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Emergencies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Male
Medical History Taking
Middle Aged
Ontario
Prednisone - therapeutic use
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Spirometry
Abstract
To determine the current management of acute asthma in the emergency department and to evaluate outcome we reviewed the charts of 99 patients aged 15 to 55 years who presented to the emergency department of a tertiary referral, university-affiliated hospital and were subsequently discharged with a diagnosis of acute asthma. Outcome was evaluated prospectively, with a structured questionnaire, by telephone. During the visit pulsus paradoxus was documented in four patients. Spirometry was done in 63 patients; postbronchodilator values ranged from 0.9 to 4.1 L. A total of 92 patients received inhaled bronchodilator therapy, most by wet nebulization. Sixteen patients received anticholinergic agents and three received theophylline. Ingested corticosteroids were given to 27 patients. Of the 71 patients contacted, a mean of 12 days after the visit, 26 (37%) had sought further medical attention, 19 at the emergency department; 9 had required admission. Forty-six patients reported that their condition had improved, but over 60% continued to have cough, sputum production, nocturnal waking and early-morning chest tightness. The results indicate that asthma continues to be undertreated in the emergency department and highlight the importance of routine spirometry in all patients and the need for systemic corticosteroid therapy.
Notes
Cites: Chest. 1987 Sep;92(3):460-63622023
Cites: JAMA. 1983 Apr 15;249(15):2043-66403719
Cites: Chest. 1988 Oct;94(4):718-222971515
Cites: Chest. 1988 Oct;94(4):723-63168567
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1988 Sep;138(3):535-93202409
Cites: CMAJ. 1989 Jan 15;140(2):153-62910398
Cites: Chest. 1989 Apr;95(4):888-942647424
Cites: Respir Med. 1989 May;83(3):219-262595040
Cites: Am J Med. 1983 Aug;75(2):259-626881177
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1984 Mar 1;310(9):577-806694709
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1985 Aug;132(2):283-62862819
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1986 Jan 16;314(3):150-23510384
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1986 Jan;77(1 Pt 1):1-53944367
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Jan 25;1(8474):181-42868207
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1986 Feb 13;314(7):423-93511379
Cites: Thorax. 1985 Dec;40(12):897-9022869594
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1986 Sep;105(3):390-83090920
Cites: Eur J Respir Dis Suppl. 1986;147:16-213533588
Cites: Am J Med. 1987 Jan;82(1):59-642879458
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Aug 11;309(6):336-96866069
Cites: Chest. 1988 Mar;93(3):476-813342656
Cites: Chest. 1988 Mar;93(3):614-83342674
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Mar 18;259(11):1678-843278146
Cites: Lancet. 1988 Apr 30;1(8592):981-32896838
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Jul 22-29;260(4):527-93385910
Cites: BMJ. 1988 Aug 6;297(6645):395-63408980
Cites: Br J Dis Chest. 1988 Apr;82(2):162-73166929
Cites: Am J Med. 1971 Dec;51(6):788-985129547
Cites: Br Med J. 1975 Dec 20;4(5998):680-21203720
Cites: Lancet. 1976 Apr 24;1(7965):882-458147
Cites: Am J Med. 1979 Apr;66(4):565-72373438
Cites: Br Med J. 1980 Nov 1;281(6249):1191-47427632
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1981 Feb 21;282(6264):598-6006451257
Cites: Chest. 1981 Nov;80(5):535-67297142
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1982 Sep 25;285(6345):849-506811037
Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1982;23(1):27-307128670
Cites: Folia Morphol (Praha). 1982;30(3):285-907141344
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1982 Nov;126(5):825-87149447
Comment In: CMAJ. 1990 Sep 15;143(6):459-602207896
Comment In: CMAJ. 1990 Jun 1;142(11):1183, 1186-72344573
PubMed ID
1968778 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Adaptive reactions of external respiration in workers of European North].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100569
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2010;(4):24-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
A B Gudkov
O N Popova
A N Nikanov
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2010;(4):24-7
Date
2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adult
Body mass index
Cold Climate
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Respiration
Sex Factors
Spirometry
Time Factors
Abstract
Studies covered changes in external respiration system of young able-bodied males and females exposed to ambient air of negative temperature in natural climate of European North. Findings are that breathing cold air causes significant changes in static respiratory volumes and capacities, so vital lung capacity, inspiratory reserve volume and expiratory reserve volume were decreased, respiratory capacity was increased, respiratory level was decreased. Changes in the females appeared to be more than those in the males.
PubMed ID
20560494 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adult respiratory outcomes of extreme preterm birth. A regional cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268379
Source
Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2015 Mar;12(3):313-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Maria Vollsæter
Hege H Clemm
Emma Satrell
Geir E Eide
Ola D Røksund
Trond Markestad
Thomas Halvorsen
Source
Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2015 Mar;12(3):313-22
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Forecasting
Humans
Infant, Extremely Premature
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Lung
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Retrospective Studies
Spirometry
Total lung capacity
Young Adult
Abstract
Lifetime respiratory function after extremely preterm birth (gestational age=28 wk or birth weight=1,000 g) is unknown.
To compare changes from 18-25 years of age in respiratory health, lung function, and airway responsiveness in young adults born extremely prematurely to that of term-born control subjects.
Comprehensive lung function investigations and interviews were conducted in a population-based sample of 25-year-old subjects born extremely prematurely in western Norway in 1982-1985, and in matched term-born control subjects. Comparison was made to similar data collected at 18 years of age.
At 25 years of age, 46/51 (90%) eligible subjects born extremely prematurely and 39/46 (85%) control subjects participated. z-Scores for FEV1, forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of vital capacity, and FEV1/FVC were significantly reduced in subjects born extremely prematurely by 1.02, 1.26, and 0.88, respectively, and airway resistance (kPa/L/s) was increased (0.23 versus 0.18). Residual volume to total lung capacity increased with severity of neonatal bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Responsiveness to methacholine (dose-response slope; 3.16 versus 0.85) and bronchial lability index (7.5 versus 4.8%) were increased in subjects born extremely prematurely. Lung function changes from 18 to 25 years and respiratory symptoms were similar in the prematurely born and term-born groups.
Lung function in early adult life was in the normal range in the majority of subjects born extremely prematurely, but methacholine responsiveness was more pronounced than in term-born young adults, suggesting a need for ongoing pulmonary monitoring in this population.
PubMed ID
25616079 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airflow limitation and changes in pulmonary function among bleachery workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174038
Source
Eur Respir J. 2005 Jul;26(1):133-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
A J Mehta
P K Henneberger
K. Torén
A-C Olin
Author Affiliation
Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 1095 Willowdale Road, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2005 Jul;26(1):133-9
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Airway Resistance
Case-Control Studies
Chlorine Compounds - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Industry
Lung Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Oxides - adverse effects
Ozone - adverse effects
Paper
Probability
Reference Values
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk assessment
Spirometry - methods
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigated whether chronic airflow limitation and rapid decline in pulmonary function were associated with peak exposures to ozone and other irritant gases in pulp mills. Bleachery workers potentially exposed to irritant gassings (n = 178) from three Swedish pulp mills, and a comparison group of workers not exposed to irritant gassings (n = 54) from two paper mills, were studied. Baseline surveys occurred in 1995-1996, with follow-up surveys in 1998-1999. Participants performed spirometry and answered questions regarding ozone, chlorine dioxide (ClO2), and sulphur dioxide (SO2) gassings. From regression models controlling for potential confounders, declines in both the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (-24 mL x yr(-1)) and the forced vital capacity (FVC) (-19 mL x yr(-1)) were associated with ClO2/SO2 gassings. At follow-up, the prevalence of chronic airflow limitation (i.e. FEV1/FVC less than the lower limit of normal) was elevated for participants with only pre-baseline ozone gassings and with both pre-baseline and interval ozone gassings, after controlling for potential confounders. These findings suggest that obstructive effects among bleachery workers are associated with ozone gassings, and that adverse effects on spirometry might also accompany chlorine dioxide/sulphur dioxide gassings. Peak exposures to irritant gases in pulp mills should be prevented.
PubMed ID
15994400 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airways inflammation and glucan in a rowhouse area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205318
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Jun;157(6 Pt 1):1798-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
J. Thorn
R. Rylander
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Jun;157(6 Pt 1):1798-803
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Allergens - immunology
Ascomycota
Blood Proteins - analysis
Bronchial Provocation Tests
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Eosinophil Granule Proteins
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Glucans - analysis
Humans
Humidity
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Inflammation Mediators - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Peroxidase - blood
Residence Characteristics
Ribonucleases
Spirometry
Sweden
Vital Capacity
beta-Glucans
Abstract
A study was undertaken in a number of rowhouses, some of which had had previous problems related to dampness and water leakage. The aim of the study was to assess the relation between exposure to airborne (1--> 3)-beta-D-glucan, a cell-wall substance in molds, and airways inflammation. The study involved 75 houses with indoor (1--> 3)-beta-D-glucan levels ranging from 0 to 19 ng/m3. Of 170 invited tenants, 129 (76%) participated in the study. A questionnaire relating to symptoms was used, and measurements were made of lung function and airway responsiveness. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured in serum. Atopy was determined with the Phadiatop test. The major findings were a relation between exposure to (1--> 3)- beta-D-glucan and an increased prevalence of atopy, a slightly increased amount of MPO, and a decrease in FEV1 over the number of years lived in the house. The results suggests the hypothesis that exposure to (1--> 3)-beta-D-glucan or molds indoors could be associated with signs of a non-specific inflammation.
PubMed ID
9620908 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airway symptoms and lung function in the local population after the oil tank explosion in Gulen, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118172
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2012;12:76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jens-Tore Granslo
Magne Bråtveit
Bjørg Eli Hollund
Ågot Irgens
Cecilie Svanes
Nils Magerøy
Bente Elisabeth Moen
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. jens-tore.granslo@helse-bergen.no
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2012;12:76
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Explosions
Female
Humans
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Spirometry
Abstract
Oil tanks containing a mixture of hydrocarbons, including sulphuric compounds, exploded and caught fire in an industrial harbour. This study assesses airway symptoms and lung function in the nearby population 1½ years after the explosion.
A cross-sectional study included individuals =18 years old. Individuals living 20 km away formed a control group. A questionnaire and spirometry tests were completed by 223 exposed individuals (response rate men 70%, women 75%) and 179 control individuals (response rate men 51%, women 65%). Regression analyses included adjustment for smoking, occupational exposure, atopy, infection in the preceding month and age. Analyses of symptoms were also adjusted for stress reactions related to the accident.
Exposed individuals experienced significantly more blocked nose (odds ratio 1.7 [95% confidence interval 1.0, 2.8]), rhinorrhoea (1.6 [1.1, 3.3]), nose irritation (3.4 [2.0, 5.9]), sore throat (3.1 [1.8, 5.5]), morning cough (3.5 [2.0, 5.5]), daily cough (2.2 [1.4, 3.7]), cough >3 months a year (2.9 [1.5, 5.3]) and cough with phlegm (1.9 [1.2, 3.1]) than control individuals. A significantly increasing trend was found for nose symptoms and cough, depending on the proximity of home address to explosion site (daily cough, 3-6km 1.8 [1.0, 3.1],
Notes
Cites: Clin Physiol. 2001 Nov;21(6):648-6011722472
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(5):426-3219688636
Cites: Behav Res Ther. 2003 Dec;41(12):1489-9614705607
Cites: BMJ. 1993 Nov 13;307(6914):1251-58281057
Cites: BMJ. 1994 Sep 24;309(6957):773-47950562
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1995 Sep;152(3):1107-367663792
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1997 Jul;100(1):16-229257782
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 1999 Mar;15(3):293-910395061
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1999 May;53(5):306-1010396538
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1999 Jul-Aug;54(4):254-6310433184
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004 Nov;114(5):1116-2315536419
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2005 Apr;113(4):406-1115811830
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 2005;27:107-1415958431
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2005 Aug;26(2):319-3816055882
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Sep 15;162(6):499-50716107572
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2005 Nov;26(5):948-6816264058
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Sep 15;176(6):532-5517507545
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Sep 15;176(6):610-617556713
Cites: Addict Behav. 2008 Aug;33(8):1039-4718501524
Cites: Thorax. 2009 Aug;64(8):657-6319359266
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2009 Oct;35(5):368-7519436923
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2009 Dec;35(6):454-6119806271
Cites: Psychol Methods. 2009 Dec;14(4):349-6619968397
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2010 Oct 19;153(8):489-9820733177
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2002 Jul;44(7):601-512134522
PubMed ID
23234609 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergic contact dermatitis in response to budesonide reactivated by inhalation of the allergen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15363
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2002 Jun;46(6):880-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Marléne Isaksson
Magnus Bruze
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2002 Jun;46(6):880-5
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adult
Allergens - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Budesonide - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - etiology
Double-Blind Method
Drug Hypersensitivity
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patch Tests
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Spirometry
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Up to 5% of patients with dermatitis who are consecutively patch tested are allergic to one or more corticosteroids. However, few reports of allergic mucosal and skin symptoms in patients with asthma and rhinitis caused by inhaled corticosteroids exist. OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine whether inhalation of budesonide would result in reactivation of patch test reactions caused by budesonide. METHODS: The study, which was randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled, was ethically reviewed by the Medical Faculty, University of Lund, Sweden. Fifteen nonasthmatic patients who were initially given a diagnosis of budesonide hypersensitivity on patch testing from less than 1 up to 8 years before the study were provoked with budesonide or placebo by inhalation 6 weeks after they had been patch tested with budesonide, its R and S diastereomers, and potentially cross-reacting substances. Lung function was studied by using spirometry and repeated peak expiratory flow measurements. RESULTS: In 4 of 7 patients who inhaled budesonide, reactivation of previously positive patch test reactions was noted within 24 hours, in contrast to 0 of 8 patients who inhaled placebo (P =.026). No adverse pulmonary responses could be detected. CONCLUSION: This study shows that allergic skin reactions may occur in patients with contact allergy to budesonide when inhaled forms of the drug are used.
PubMed ID
12063485 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alpha 1-antitrypsin phenotypes and obstructive lung disease in the city of Oslo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246806
Source
Scand J Respir Dis. 1979 Oct;60(5):267-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1979
Author
A. Gulsvik
M K Fagerhol
Source
Scand J Respir Dis. 1979 Oct;60(5):267-74
Date
Oct-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Phenotype
Spirometry
Vital Capacity
alpha 1-Antitrypsin - analysis - genetics
Abstract
In a community survey in Oslo, Norway, comprising 1268 persons, alpha 1-antitrypsin concentration in serum (AT) and protease-inhibitor (Pi) phenotypes were examined in 1258 subjects. Estimated percentage distribution of Pi-phenotypes in the target population aged 15--70 years was M 87.30%, MS 4.65%, MZ 4.73%, FM 2.69%, SZ 0.13%, IM 0.20%, FZ 0.07%, S 0.06%, FS 0.07% and Z 0.06%. The distribution curve of AT had a normal (Gaussian) shape and the ranges of AT demonstrated great overlap of types MS and MZ with type M. In subjects with phenotype MZ neither respiratory symptoms nor physicians' diagnoses of chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD) were more frequent than in M subjects. Physicians' diagnoses of COLD were slightly more frequent (0.06 greater than P greater than 0.01) in subjects with phenotype MS than M, probably due to there being more smokers in the MS group. Spirometric variables given as per-cent of predicted values yielded large differences between smokers and non-smokers but no differences among phenotypes M, MS and MZ. Radiologic signs of hypertransradiancy and/or emphysema were evently distributed in M, MS and MZ subjects. The only subject observed with Pi-type Z and one out of three subjects with type SZ had COLD. In neither smokers nor non-smokers is phenotype MZ a risk factor of clinical importance for development of obstructive lung disease.
PubMed ID
316573 View in PubMed
Less detail

443 records – page 1 of 45.