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Aboriginal healing: regaining balance and culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171195
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):13-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Linda M Hunter
Jo Logan
Jean-Guy Goulet
Sylvia Barton
Author Affiliation
The Conference Board of Canada.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):13-22
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Holistic Nursing
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Spiritual Therapies
Urban Population
Abstract
This ethnographic study explored the question, How do urban-based First Nations peoples use healing traditions to address their health issues? The objectives were to examine how Aboriginal traditions addressed health issues and explore the link between such traditions and holism in nursing practice. Data collection consisted of individual interviews, participant observations, and field notes. Three major categories that emerged from the data analysis were: following a cultural path, gaining balance, and sharing in the circle of life. The global theme of healing holistically included following a cultural path by regaining culture through the use of healing traditions; gaining balance in the four realms of spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical health; and sharing in the circle of life by cultural interactions between Aboriginal peoples and non-Aboriginal health professionals. Implications for practice include incorporating the concepts of balance, holism, and cultural healing into the health care services for diverse Aboriginal peoples.
PubMed ID
16410432 View in PubMed
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Ah-ayitaw isi e-ki-kiskeyihtahkik maskihkiy. They knew both sides of medicine: Cree tales of curing and cursing told by Alice Ahenakew. [Review of: Ahenakew, A. Ah-ayitaw isi e-ki-kiskeyihtahkik maskihkiy. They knew both sides of medicine: Cree tales of curing and cursing told by Alice Ahenakew. Winnipeg: U. of Manitoba Pr., 2000].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168606
Source
Can Hist Rev. 2002;83(3):432-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002

Building bridges: an interpretive phenomenological analysis of nurse educators' clinical experience using the T.R.U.S.T. Model for inclusive spiritual care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124067
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2012;9:1-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Karen Scott Barss
Author Affiliation
Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science & Technology, Canada. karen.barss@siast.sk.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2012;9:1-17
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Nursing - organization & administration
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Holistic Health
Holistic Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Models, Nursing
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Faculty Practice - organization & administration
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Spiritual Therapies - methods
Spirituality
Abstract
Educating nurses to provide evidence-based, non-intrusive spiritual care in today's pluralistic context is both daunting and essential. Qualitative research is needed to investigate what helps nurse educators feel more prepared to meet this challenge. This paper presents findings from an interpretive phenomenological analysis of the experience of nurse educators who used the T.R.U.S.T. Model for Inclusive Spiritual Care in their clinical teaching. The T.R.U.S.T. Model is an evidence-based, non-linear resource developed by the author and piloted in the undergraduate nursing program in which she teaches. Three themes are presented: "The T.R.U.S.T. Model as a bridge to spiritual exploration"; "blockades to the bridge"; and "unblocking the bridge". T.R.U.S.T. was found to have a positive influence on nurse educators' comfort and confidence in the teaching of spiritual care. Recommendations for maximizing the model's positive impact are provided, along with "embodied" resources to support holistic teaching and learning about spiritual care.
PubMed ID
22628352 View in PubMed
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Complementary and alternative health care use in young children with physical disabilities waiting for rehabilitation services in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147563
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2009;31(25):2111-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Karine Toupin April
Debbie Ehrmann Feldman
Maria Victoria Zunzunegui
Martin Descarreaux
Lisa Grilli
Author Affiliation
Département de Médecine Sociale et Préventive and Groupe de Recherche Interdisciplinaire en Santé, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ktoupina@uottawa.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2009;31(25):2111-7
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - utilization
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Complementary Therapies - utilization
Disabled Children - rehabilitation
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Manipulation, Chiropractic - utilization
Manipulation, Osteopathic - utilization
Quality of Life
Quebec
Reflexotherapy - utilization
Spiritual Therapies - utilization
Abstract
We wished to determine the frequency of complementary and alternative health care (CAHC) use in preschool aged children with physical disabilities (PD) waiting for public rehabilitation services in the province of Quebec (Canada), to evaluate its effectiveness from the parents' perspective and to explore factors associated with its utilisation.
Children with PD referred to rehabilitation centres from two Montreal hospitals were recruited. We evaluated the use of CAHC and its effectiveness from the parents' perspective in a cross-sectional manner, using descriptive statistics. We explored factors associated with utilisation, using logistic regression models.
In this group of children with PD (n = 206, mean age: 2.6 years), 31 (15%) used CAHC and 15 (48.4%) of those tried more than one type. CAHC was considered at least moderately beneficial by parents in 53% of the cases. The use of CAHC was higher among children with low health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and children whose mothers were more educated and considered themselves as Canadian (p
PubMed ID
19888841 View in PubMed
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Consumers' goals in psychiatric rehabilitation and their concordance with existing services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176235
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2005 Feb;56(2):209-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Tania Lecomte
Charles J Wallace
Michel Perreault
Jean Caron
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. lecomte@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2005 Feb;56(2):209-11
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Community Mental Health Services - standards
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Goals
Health services needs and demand
Health status
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Patient satisfaction
Religion and Psychology
Severity of Illness Index
Socioeconomic Factors
Spiritual Therapies
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe the rehabilitation goals of 165 consumers with serious mental illness who were living in the community and to assess the level of concordance between the consumers' perceived importance of their goals and the services they received to help them meet those goals. A structured interview was used to facilitate the expression of rehabilitation goals by consumers in the psychiatric rehabilitation program of a hospital in Montreal, Canada. The most frequently mentioned rehabilitation goals pertained to improving consumers' financial situation, physical health, cognitive capacities, and symptoms. Among these goals, the level of concordance was highest for services addressing symptoms and lowest for religious or spiritual goals.
PubMed ID
15703351 View in PubMed
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Dismantling sociocultural barriers to eye care with tele-ophthalmology: lessons from an Alberta Cree community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115092
Source
Clin Invest Med. 2013;36(2):E57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sourabh Arora
Ayaz K Kurji
Matthew T S Tennant
Author Affiliation
Royal Alexandra Hospital, University of Alberta, Department of Ophthalmology, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Clin Invest Med. 2013;36(2):E57-63
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Cultural Characteristics
Cultural Competency
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - therapy
Diabetic Retinopathy - diagnosis - therapy
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American
Language
Ophthalmology - methods
Patient Participation
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Spiritual Therapies
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
There are significant disparities in access to health care amongst Aboriginal Canadians. The purpose of this study was to determine whether tele-ophthalmology services, provided to Aboriginal Canadians in a culturally-sensitive community-based clinic, could overcome social and cultural barriers in ways that would be difficult in the traditional hospital-based setting.
The Aboriginal Diabetes Wellness Program of Alberta incorporates culturally-sensitive health-related activities and rituals as a component of a diabetic retinopathy tele-ophthalmology screening program. Metrics of program attendance were collected while stakeholders participated in a survey to identify barriers to healthcare delivery.
Aboriginal patients, cultural liaison, nurses and program administrators revealed economic, geographic, social and cultural barriers to healthcare faced by Aboriginal people. It was found that the introduction of culturally-sensitive programs led to increased appointment attendance; from 25% to 85%. Involvement of Aboriginal nurses, inclusion of culturally-sensitive activities and participation in spiritual ceremonies led to qualitative accounts of increased patient satisfaction, trust towards the healthcare team and communication amongst participants.
A culturally-sensitive model of healthcare delivery in a community-based health clinic improved access to tele-ophthalmology services. This was demonstrated by increased attendance at appointments and increased satisfaction amongst patients.
PubMed ID
23544606 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Holist Nurs. 2017 Mar;35(1):44-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Natasha Prodan-Bhalla
Diane Middagh
Sharon Jinkerson-Brass
Shabnam Ziabakhsh
Ann Pederson
Charlene King
Source
J Holist Nurs. 2017 Mar;35(1):44-52
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Culturally Competent Care - methods - standards
Health Promotion - methods - standards
Heart Diseases - prevention & control - psychology - therapy
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Qualitative Research
Spiritual Therapies - manpower - methods - psychology
Abstract
Theories on the importance of holistic and spiritual healing within nonconventional models of care are vast, yet there is little written about the practical, clinical-level interventions required to deliver such practices in collaborative cross-cultural settings. This article describes the learning experiences and transformative journeys of non-Indigenous nurse practitioners working with a Cultural Lead from an Indigenous community in British Columbia, Canada. The goal of the Seven Sisters Healthy Heart Project was to improve heart health promotion in an Indigenous community through a model of knowledge translation. The article describes the development of a bridge between two cultures in an attempt to deliver culturally responsive programming. Our journeys are represented in a phenomenological approach regarding relationships, pedagogy, and expertise. We were able to find ways to balance two worlds-the medical health services model and Indigenous holistic models of healing. The key to building the bridge was our willingness to be vulnerable, to trust in each other's way of teaching and learning, and allowing diverse viewpoints and knowledge sources to be present. Our work has vast implications for health promotion in Indigenous communities, as it closes the gap between theory and practice by demonstrating how Indigenous models can be integrated into mainstream health promotion practices.
PubMed ID
27093902 View in PubMed
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Hawaiian health practitioners in contemporary society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189008
Source
Pac Health Dialog. 2001 Sep;8(2):260-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
H K Chang
Author Affiliation
Haumana Biomedical Program, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Pacific Biomedical Research Center, Honolulu 96822, USA. healani@pbrc.hawaii.edu
Source
Pac Health Dialog. 2001 Sep;8(2):260-73
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ethnic Groups
Female
Hawaii
Health Services Research
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Spiritual Therapies
United States
Abstract
Hawaiian medical practices in Hawai'i became fragmented and deteriorated following the arrival of Western civilization. With the resurgence of Hawaiian pride, interest has risen to preserve what remains of Hawaiian healing methods. The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which Hawaiian healing modalities are still in existence and practiced in the 1990s by Hawaiian health practitioners. Twenty-five Hawaiian health practitioners on the island of O'ahu agreed to in-depth interviews on their specific training and current practices of Hawaiian healing. Data collection included demographic characteristics, cultural attributes, training patterns, healing modalities, motivation to practice, spirituality and health, use of Hawaiian medicines, and training of haumana (students). Common practices as well as differences between practitioners and specialties were explored. This study found that a small, but substantive, component of Hawaiian healing is practiced by a growing number of Hawaiian practitioners. Content analyses identified two major components of Hawaiian healing: (1) attributes of Hawaiian culture, and (2) elements of spirituality in health and healing. Three significant modalities remain: ho'olomilomi, massage; la'au lapa'au, herbal medicine; and ho'oponopono, conflict resolution. Seventeen or 68% reported being skilled in more than one healing modality and 56% were training haumana. All practitioners reported apprenticeships under one or more master healers or a recognized elder healer--often a family member. Prior to, and after, the administration of any healing modality, spiritual blessings were administered by all practitioners to initiate the healing process and end the healing session. Hawaiian values--such as lokahi, harmony between man, nature, and the gods--are essential for holistic health. Without lokahi, there is illness. In summary, this study provides data that previously did not exist on contemporary Hawaiian health practitioners. Public health planners and health care professionals may find this information useful in developing culturally competent health programs for Hawaiian clients or patients.
PubMed ID
12180505 View in PubMed
Less detail

Increasing participation in cancer research: insights from Native Hawaiian women in medically underserved communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171995
Source
Pac Health Dialog. 2004 Sep;11(2):170-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Lana Sue Ka'opua
Diane Mitschke
Joelene Lono
Author Affiliation
Cancer Research Center of Hawai'i, University of Hawai'i, USA. lkaopua@crch.hawaii.edu
Source
Pac Health Dialog. 2004 Sep;11(2):170-5
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical research
Female
Focus Groups
Hawaii
Health Care Surveys
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Oceanic ancestry group - psychology
Patient Selection
Questionnaires
Research Subjects - psychology - supply & distribution
Spiritual Therapies
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
The cancer burden falls heavily on Native Hawaiian women, and of particular concern are those living in medically underserved communities where participation in potentially helpful clinical studies may be limited. Difficulty in accrual of Native Hawaiian women to a culturally-grounded intervention led researchers to conduct focus groups aimed at exploring attitudes towards research, use of a traditional Hawaiian practice for family discussion, and study promotion. Social marketing theory guided the development of discussion questions and a survey. Through purposive sampling, 30 women from medically underserved communities were recruited. Content analysis was used to identify major discussion themes. Findings indicate that lack of informational access may be a major barrier to participation. Study information disseminated through community channels with targeted outreach to social and religious organizations, promotion through face-to-face contact with researchers, and culturally tailored messages directed to families were preferred. Community oriented strategies based on linkages with organizational networks may increase participation.
PubMed ID
16281696 View in PubMed
Less detail

27 records – page 1 of 3.