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Anthropometric data relating to normal and scoliotic Scandinavian girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39594
Source
Spine. 1985 Mar;10(2):123-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1985
Author
H. Normelli
J. Sevastik
G. Ljung
S. Aaro
A M Jönsson-Söderström
Source
Spine. 1985 Mar;10(2):123-6
Date
Mar-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Body Height
Body Weight
Child
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Menarche
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Scoliosis - physiopathology
Spine - growth & development - physiopathology
Sweden
Abstract
The increase in height and weight and the age at the menarche have been determined in girls with idiopathic scoliosis and in age-matched normal girls. The scoliotic girls were classified according to the position of the curve. The menarche was found to occur significantly later in girls with either a thoracolumbar or a double primary curve than in the control group; it was also significantly later in those two groups combined than in the girls with a right convex thoracic curve. At the time of the menarche, the girls with a thoracolumbar or a double primary curve were significantly taller than those in the control group. The girls with a double primary curve, and these together with girls with a thoracolumbar curve, were also significantly taller than those with a right convex thoracic curve. Those in the control group were significantly heavier, and in some age groups significantly taller, than children born during the period 1953-1958 and providing earlier Swedish research data. The average age at the menarche did not differ from that for a normal population for this country. The observed differences between the group with a right convex thoracic curve and that with a thoracolumbar or a double primary curve indicate that the pathomechanism, and even the etiology, may vary with the form of idiopathic scoliosis.
PubMed ID
4002036 View in PubMed
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Development of trunk asymmetry in a cohort of children ages 11 to 22 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198994
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2000 Mar 1;25(5):570-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2000
Author
M J Nissinen
M M Heliövaara
J T Seitsamo
M H Könönen
K A Hurmerinta
M S Poussa
Author Affiliation
Jorvi Hospital, Espoo, the National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2000 Mar 1;25(5):570-4
Date
Mar-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Scoliosis - epidemiology - pathology
Sex Distribution
Spine - growth & development - pathology
Abstract
A cohort study with a follow-up period of 11 years.
To study the growth of the spine with a focus on the development of trunk asymmetry and scoliosis.
Trunk asymmetry, a common phenomenon at adolescence, can be considered the clinical expression of scoliosis. The importance of the pubertal growth spurt has been stressed in the natural history of scoliosis. However, no cohort studies have focused on the ascending and descending phase of the spine's peak growth and the development of trunk asymmetry.
The cohort consisted of all the fourth-grade school children in the Western school district of Helsinki, Finland, in the spring of 1986. These 1060 children (515 girls and 545 boys), from the average age of 11 to 14 years, were invited to undergo annual examinations. The 855 children (80.7%) who had participated in the study at the age of 14 years were invited to a reexamination at the age of 22 years. This invitation was accepted by 430 (208 women and 222 men; 54%) of those invited. The forward bending test, the spinal pantography, and the anthropometric measurements were carried out by the same author (M.N.) throughout this study.
At 22 years of age, 30% of the adults were found to be symmetric, with a hump less than 4 mm in the forward bending test, whereas 51% had a hump of 4 to 9 mm, and 19% had a hump 10 mm or larger (major asymmetry). The directional asymmetry of trunk surface, a skew to the right at the thoracic level and to the left at the lumbar level at puberty, remained constant at adult age. The prevalence of major trunk asymmetry at adult age was the same in both women and men, in contrast to the female predominance at puberty in this cohort. There were close correlations in the degrees of thoracic and lumbar asymmetry between puberty and adult ages.
The shape of the back develops mainly during the pubertal growth spurt at ages 12 to 14 years in girls and boys. Trunk asymmetry (and mild scoliosis) seems as prevalent in young adult women as in men, although at puberty idiopathic scoliosis was twice as prevalent among girls as among boys in this cohort.
PubMed ID
10749633 View in PubMed
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Eating Behavior Traits, Weight Loss Attempts, and Vertebral Dimensions Among the General Northern Finnish Population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310424
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2019 Nov 01; 44(21):E1264-E1271
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-01-2019
Author
Petteri Oura
Jaakko Niinimäki
Jaro Karppinen
Marjukka Nurkkala
Author Affiliation
Center for Life Course Health Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2019 Nov 01; 44(21):E1264-E1271
Date
Nov-01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Feeding Behavior - ethnology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis
Risk factors
Smoking
Spine - growth & development
Surveys and Questionnaires
Weight Loss
Abstract
A population-based birth cohort study.
To evaluate the associations of eating behavior traits and weight loss attempts with vertebral size among the general Northern Finnish population.
Vertebral fragility fractures are a typical manifestation of osteoporosis, and small vertebral dimensions are a well-established risk factor for vertebral fracturing. Previous studies have associated cognitive eating restraint and diet-induced weight loss with deteriorated bone quality at various skeletal sites, but data on vertebral geometry are lacking.
This study of 1338 middle-aged Northern Finns evaluated the associations of eating behavior traits (flexible and rigid cognitive restraint of eating, uncontrolled eating, emotional eating; assessed by the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire-18) and weight loss attempts (assessed by a separate questionnaire item) with magnetic resonance imaging-derived vertebral cross-sectional area (CSA). Sex-stratified linear regression models were used to analyze the data, taking body mass index, leisure-time physical activity, general diet, smoking, and socioeconomic status as potential confounders.
Women with rigid or rigid-and-flexible cognitive eating restraints had 3.2% to 3.4% smaller vertebral CSA than those with no cognitive restraint (P?=?0.05). Similarly, the women who reported multiple weight loss attempts in adulthood and midlife had 3.5% smaller vertebral size than those who did not (P?=?0.03). Other consistent findings were not obtained from either sex.
Rigid cognitive eating restraint and multiple weight loss attempts predict small vertebral size and thus decreased spinal health among middle-aged women, but not among men. Future longitudinal studies should confirm these findings.
3.
PubMed ID
31205179 View in PubMed
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Height of girls with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185928
Source
Eur Spine J. 2003 Jun;12(3):288-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Mauno Ylikoski
Author Affiliation
Orton Orthopaedic Hospital, Invalid Foundation, Tenholantie 10, 00280 Helsinki, Finland. mauno.ylikoski@invalidisaatio.fi
Source
Eur Spine J. 2003 Jun;12(3):288-91
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aging - physiology
Anthropometry
Body Height - physiology
Child
Female
Finland
Humans
Kyphosis - pathology - physiopathology - radiography
Menarche - physiology
Reference Values
Scoliosis - pathology - physiopathology - radiography
Spine - growth & development - pathology - physiopathology
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
In a Finnish population, the standing height of 1500 consecutive female patients aged 9-24 years (mean 13.9 years) with untreated idiopathic scoliosis of at least 10 degrees in their lateral curves was compared with the standing height of average girls. The mean magnitude of the major curves was 29.4 degrees (range 10 degrees-80 degrees), and that of the minor curves 20.3 degrees (range 0 degrees-66 degrees). A formula for the height loss caused by the lateral curves, and that caused by thoracic kyphosis, was derived. The corrected height of the girls with idiopathic scoliosis was highly significantly (P
PubMed ID
12687442 View in PubMed
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Physical activity and low-back pain in schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86970
Source
Eur Spine J. 2008 Mar;17(3):373-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Skoffer Birgit
Foldspang Anders
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Building 1264, Vennelyst Boulevard, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. BSkoffer@dadlnet.dk
Source
Eur Spine J. 2008 Mar;17(3):373-9
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adolescent
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Exercise Therapy - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Male
Motivation
Physical Fitness - psychology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Schools - standards - statistics & numerical data
Soccer - statistics & numerical data
Spinal Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Spine - growth & development
Sports - statistics & numerical data
Swimming - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Design of the experiment is to study the cross-sectional sample with retrospective information. The objective is to identify the types of physical activity associated with the decreased occurrence of low-back pain (LBP) in schoolchildren. Physical activity may be hypothesized to possess a potential for LBP prevention. The possible connection between LBP and specific sports activities is however sparsely documented. A total of 546, 15- to 16-year-old schoolchildren filled a questionnaire on current physical activities and LBP occurrence and severity. In multiple logistic regressions, the association of LBP with exposure variables was corrected for body height and weight (data from school health service files) and for anthropometric and school furniture parameters. More than half of the children reported pain or discomfort in the low-back region during the preceding 3 months, and 1/4 experienced a decreased functioning or need of care because of LBP. LBP correlated with physical inactivity, e.g. time spent on homework and hours watching TV or video, and with a series of sports activities, e.g. jogging, handball playing and gymnastics. Among sports activities, only swimming and the number of hours per week participating in soccer were associated with a decreased LBP prevalence. With the exception of swimming and soccer, the types of sport reported by this schoolchild population do not offer themselves for consideration as tools for LBP prevention. Based on the associations found with indicators of physical inactivity, attempts to motivate the children to increase their general physical activity level should be considered for trial.
PubMed ID
18180961 View in PubMed
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