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8 records – page 1 of 1.

[Degenerative and dystrophic diseases of the spine and their treatment with Saki mud].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248032
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1978 Dec;(12):68-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1978

Health care utilization for musculoskeletal disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145157
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2010 Feb;62(2):161-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Crystal MacKay
Mayilee Canizares
Aileen M Davis
Elizabeth M Badley
Author Affiliation
Arthritis Community Research and Evaluation Unit, Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. cmackay@uhnres.utoronto.ca
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2010 Feb;62(2):161-9
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Arthritis - therapy
Bone Diseases - therapy
Databases, Factual
Health Services - utilization
Hospitalization
Humans
Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Musculoskeletal Diseases - therapy
Ontario
Orthopedics - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Role
Physicians, Family
Spinal Diseases - therapy
Wounds and Injuries - therapy
Abstract
To examine patterns of ambulatory care and hospital utilization for people with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), including arthritis and related conditions, bone and spinal conditions, trauma and related conditions, and unspecified MSDs.
Administrative data from the Ontario Health Insurance Plan database for ambulatory care physician visits, the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System database for day (outpatient) surgeries and emergency department visits, and the Discharge Abstract Database for hospital discharges were used to examine health care utilization for MSDs in fiscal year 2006-2007. Person visit rates (number of people with physician visits or hospital encounters per population) were calculated.
Overall, 22.3% of Ontario's population (2.8 million persons) saw a physician for an MSD in ambulatory settings. Person visit rates were highest for arthritis and related conditions (107.7 per 1,000 population), followed by trauma and related conditions (89.6 per 1,000 population), unspecified MSDs (71.0 per 1,000 population), and bone and spinal conditions (62.4 per 1,000 population). The majority of visits were to primary care physicians, with 83.2% of those with visits for all MSDs seeing a primary care physician at least once. Overall, 33.0% of people with a physician visit for an MSD saw a specialist, with orthopedic surgeons being the most commonly consulted type of specialist. In hospital settings, person visit rates for MSDs were highest in the emergency department, followed by day surgeries and inpatient hospitalizations.
The findings of our study highlight the magnitude of health care utilization for MSDs and the central role of primary care physicians in the management of these conditions.
PubMed ID
20191514 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Method of treatment of osteochondrosis and spondyloarthrosis at the Liuben Velikii health resort]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14761
Source
Ortop Travmatol Protez. 1975 Aug;(8):6-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1975

[Phytoclay therapy in combined treatment of degenerative spinal diseases in the spa Goryachy Klyuch].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163034
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 2007 Mar-Apr;(2):31
Publication Type
Article

Side-effects of chiropractic spinal manipulation: types frequency, discomfort and course.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212493
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1996 Mar;14(1):50-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
O. Senstad
C. Leboeuf-Yde
C F Borchgrevink
Author Affiliation
Nordic Institute for Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics, Odense, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1996 Mar;14(1):50-3
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chiropractic - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Manipulation, Orthopedic - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Norway
Pain - etiology
Patient satisfaction
Retrospective Studies
Sensation Disorders - etiology
Spinal Diseases - therapy
Abstract
To make a preliminary appraisal of the types of unpleasant reactions reported by patients after spinal manipulation and to estimate their frequency.
Standardized interview data collected in a longitudinal survey.
Ten chiropractors collected data on all unpleasant reactions that were reported after a maximum of six visits by ten consecutive patients per chiropractor, with the use of a questionnaire that contained mainly closed-ended questions.
Following 368 treatments in 95 patients, some type of side-effect was reported after 1/3 of treatments. Local or radiating symptoms were most commonly reported (23%). No alarming events were reported. Ninety percent of all reactions were graded by the patients as moderate or slight. They commenced on the day of therapy in 87% of cases, and had disappeared within 24 hours in 83%.
Results from this preliminary study indicate that reactions to spinal manipulation may be relatively common but benign in nature and of short duration. No estimate could be made of rare or serious side-effects.
PubMed ID
8725094 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The response of patients with degenerative-dystrophic joint diseases in middle and old age to the effects of Moscow sodium chloride baths of different concentration].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256187
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1971 Jul-Aug;36(4):316-9
Publication Type
Article

8 records – page 1 of 1.