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25 years or more after spinal cord injury: clinical conditions of individuals in the Florence and Stockholm areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129470
Source
Spinal Cord. 2012 Mar;50(3):243-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
L. Werhagen
S. Aito
L. Tucci
J. Strayer
C. Hultling
Author Affiliation
Karolinska institutet Danderyds Sjukhus, Department of clinical sciences, Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyds hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. lars.werhagen @ki.se
Source
Spinal Cord. 2012 Mar;50(3):243-6
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ethnic Groups
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Italy
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - etiology - therapy
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Retrospective analysis and retrospective follow-up.
Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients have today a nearly normal lifespan. Avoidance of medical complications is key to this end. The aim of the study was to analyse health in individuals surviving 25 years or more after traumatic SCI in Stockholm and Florence, and compare medical complications.
Data from the databases of the Spinal Unit of Florence and from the Spinalis, Stockholm were analysed. Patients included were C2-L 2, American Spinal Cord Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) A-C, and =25 years post traumatic SCI. Patients underwent a thorough neurological and general examination, and were interviewed about medical events during those years. Analysed data include: gender, age at injury, current age, neurological level, AIS, cause of injury, presence of neuropathic pain (NP), and spasticity and medical complications.
A total of 66 Italian patients and 74 Swedish patients were included. The only statistical difference between the groups was cause of injury due to falls was higher in the Florence group (P
PubMed ID
22105457 View in PubMed
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Abdominal pain in long-term spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86843
Source
Spinal Cord. 2008 Mar;46(3):198-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Finnerup N B
Faaborg P.
Krogh K.
Jensen T S
Author Affiliation
Danish Pain Research Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. finnerup@ki.au.dk
Source
Spinal Cord. 2008 Mar;46(3):198-203
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - etiology - physiopathology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Colon - physiopathology
Constipation - complications - physiopathology
Denmark
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Rectum - physiopathology
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - physiopathology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe the prevalence and character of chronic abdominal pain in a group of patients with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess predictors of abdominal pain. STUDY DESIGN: Postal survey. SETTING: Members of the Danish Paraplegic Association. METHODS: We mailed a questionnaire to 284 members of the Danish Paraplegic Association who met the inclusion criteria (member for at least 10 years). The questionnaire contained questions about cause and level of spinal injury, colorectal function and pain/discomfort. RESULTS: Seventy percent returned the questionnaire (133 men and 70 women). Mean age was 47 years. Thirty-four percent reported having chronic abdominal pain or discomfort. Onset of pain was later than 5 years after their SCI in 53%. Low defecation frequency was more common in patients with abdominal pain/discomfort and constipation more often affected their quality of life compared to patients without abdominal pain/discomfort. The most common descriptors were annoying, cramping/tightening, tender, sickening and shooting/jolting. There was no relation to age, time since injury or level of injury, but more women than men reported abdominal pain/discomfort. There was no relation of abdominal pain to other types of pain. CONCLUSION: Chronic pain located in the abdomen is frequent in patients with long-term SCI. The delayed onset following SCI and the relation to constipation suggest that constipation plays an important role for this type of pain in the spinal cord injured.
PubMed ID
17621311 View in PubMed
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Source
J Spinal Cord Med. 2012 Sep;35(5):273-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Source
J Spinal Cord Med. 2012 Sep;35(5):273-4
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Ontario
Rehabilitation Centers - trends
Spinal Cord Injuries - rehabilitation
PubMed ID
23031164 View in PubMed
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Actionable nuggets: knowledge translation tool for the needs of patients with spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269783
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2015 May;61(5):e240-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Mary Ann McColl
Alice Aiken
Karen Smith
Alexander McColl
Michael Green
Marshall Godwin
Richard Birtwhistle
Kathleen Norman
Gabrielle Brankston
Michael Schaub
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2015 May;61(5):e240-8
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia
Family Practice - education
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Newfoundland and Labrador
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Primary Health Care
Spinal Cord Injuries
Translational Medical Research - methods
Abstract
To present the results of a pilot study of an innovative methodology for translating best evidence about spinal cord injury (SCI) for family practice.
Review of Canadian and international peer-reviewed literature to develop SCI Actionable Nuggets, and a mixed qualitative-quantitative evaluation to determine Nuggets' effect on physician knowledge of and attitudes toward patients with SCI, as well as practice accessibility.
Ontario, Newfoundland, and Australia.
Forty-nine primary care physicians.
Twenty Actionable Nuggets (pertaining to key health issues associated with long-term SCI) were developed. Nugget postcards were mailed weekly for 20 weeks to participating physicians. Prior knowledge of SCI was self-rated by participants; they also completed an online posttest to assess the information they gained from the Nugget postcards. Participants' opinions about practice accessibility and accommodations for patients with SCI, as well as the acceptability and usefulness of Nuggets, were assessed in interviews.
With Actionable Nuggets, participants' knowledge of the health needs of patients with SCI improved, as knowledge increased from a self-rating of fair (58%) to very good (75%) based on posttest quiz results. The mean overall score for accessibility and accommodations in physicians' practices was 72%. Participants' awareness of the need for screening and disease prevention among this population also increased. The usefulness and acceptability of SCI Nugget postcards were rated as excellent.
Actionable Nuggets are a knowledge translation tool designed to provide family physicians with concise, practical information about the most prevalent and pressing primary care needs of patients with SCI. This evidence-based resource has been shown to be an excellent fit with information consumption processes in primary care. They were updated and adapted for distribution by the Canadian Medical Association to approximately 50,000 primary care physicians in Canada, in both English and French.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26167564 View in PubMed
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Acute cord injury. Part II: A study of 224 cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248816
Source
J R Coll Surg Edinb. 1978 Mar;23(2):107-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1978
Author
E H Botterell
Source
J R Coll Surg Edinb. 1978 Mar;23(2):107-16
Date
Mar-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational
Accidents, Traffic
Diving
Humans
Ontario
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - etiology
PubMed ID
641859 View in PubMed
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Acute management of traumatic spinal cord injury in a Greek and a Swedish region: a prospective, population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146552
Source
Spinal Cord. 2010 Jun;48(6):477-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
A. Divanoglou
A. Seiger
R. Levi
Author Affiliation
Division of Neuro-rehabilitation, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. anestis.divanoglou@ki.se
Source
Spinal Cord. 2010 Jun;48(6):477-82
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Planning
Greece - epidemiology
Humans
Neurologic Examination - methods
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Spinal Cord Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Prospective, population-based study. This paper is part of the Stockholm Thessaloniki Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Study (STATSCIS).
To characterize patient populations and to compare acute management after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI).
The Greater Thessaloniki region in Greece and the Greater Stockholm region in Sweden.
Inception cohorts with acute TSCI that were hospitalized during the study period, that is September 2006 to October 2007, were identified. Overall, 81 out of 87 cases consented to inclusion in Thessaloniki and 47 out of 49 in Stockholm. Data from Thessaloniki were collected through physical examinations, medical record reviews and communication with TSCI cases and medical teams. Data from Stockholm were retrieved from the Nordic Spinal Cord Injury Registry.
There were no significant differences between study groups with regard to core clinical characteristics. In contrast, there were significant differences in (1) transfer logistics from the scene of trauma to a tertiary-level hospital (number of intermediate admissions, modes of transportation and duration of transfer) and (2) acute key therapeutic interventions, that is, the use of mechanical ventilation (49% in Thessaloniki versus 20% in Stockholm), and performance of tracheostomy (36% in Thessaloniki versus 15% in Stockholm); spinal surgery was performed significantly more often and earlier in Stockholm than in Thessaloniki.
Despite largely similar core clinical characteristics, Stockholm and Thessaloniki cases underwent significantly different acute management, most probably to be attributed to adaptations to the differing regional approaches of care one following a systematic approach of SCI care and the other not.
PubMed ID
20029396 View in PubMed
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Advances in management of neurosurgical trauma: USA and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193146
Source
World J Surg. 2001 Sep;25(9):1179-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
D F Kelly
D P Becker
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurosurgery, UCLA School of Medicine, Box 957039, Room 18-218 NPI, Los Angeles, California 90095-7039, USA. dfkelly@ucla.edu
Source
World J Surg. 2001 Sep;25(9):1179-85
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Injuries - mortality - prevention & control - surgery
Canada
Humans
Neurosurgical Procedures - standards - trends
Patient Education as Topic
Spinal Cord Injuries - mortality - prevention & control - surgery
United States
Abstract
Traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries continue to pose serious challenges for physicians around the world. In North America, the annual number of serious head and spinal injuries has decreased over the last two decades, and of those patients who reach a hospital, the mortality and long-term morbidity have also declined. The two major reasons for this reduction in death and disability after craniospinal trauma in the United States and Canada appear to be (1) widespread implementation of prevention measures, safety legislation, and public education initiatives; and (2) further improvements in and wider availability of emergency medical systems and regional trauma centers. Improvements in neurocritical care and the implementation of evidence-based treatment guidelines for severe head injury victims may also, in part, be responsible for improved survival rates and reduced disability rates. Unfortunately, numerous clinical trials of putative neuroprotective agents conducted in North America and elsewhere during the 1990s have failed to demonstrate efficacy in head-injured patients. However, methylprednisolone does appear to confer some benefit to a select population of spinal cord injury patients. These advances in the areas of prevention, regional trauma systems, treatment guidelines, and neurocritical care that have influenced survival rates and recovery of function are discussed.
PubMed ID
11571956 View in PubMed
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Aerobic capacity, orthostatic tolerance, and exercise perceptions at discharge from inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113262
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2013 Oct;94(10):2013-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Chelsea A Pelletier
Graham Jones
Amy E Latimer-Cheung
Darren E Warburton
Audrey L Hicks
Author Affiliation
Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON.
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2013 Oct;94(10):2013-9
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise - psychology
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Hypotension, Orthostatic - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Oxygen consumption
Paraplegia - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Self Efficacy
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications
Trauma Severity Indices
Abstract
To describe physical capacity, autonomic function, and perceptions of exercise among adults with subacute spinal cord injury (SCI).
Cross-sectional.
Two inpatient SCI rehabilitation programs in Canada.
Participants (N=41; mean age ± SD, 38.9 ± 13.7y) with tetraplegia (TP; n=19), high paraplegia (HP; n=8), or low paraplegia (LP; n=14) completing inpatient SCI rehabilitation (mean ± SD, 112.9 ± 52.5d postinjury).
Not applicable.
Peak exercise capacity was determined by an arm ergometry test. As a measure of autonomic function, orthostatic tolerance was assessed by a passive sit-up test. Self-efficacy for exercise postdischarge was evaluated by a questionnaire.
There was a significant difference in peak oxygen consumption and heart rate between participants with TP (11.2 ± 3.4;mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) 113.9 ± 19.7 beats/min) and LP (17.1 ± 7.5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1); 142.8 ± 22.7 beats/min). Peak power output was also significantly lower in the TP group (30.0 ± 6.9W) compared with the HP (55.5 ± 7.56W) and LP groups (62.5 ± 12.2W). Systolic blood pressure responses to the postural challenge varied significantly between groups (-3.0 ± 33.5 mmHg in TP, 17.8 ± 14.7 mmHg in HP, 21.6 ± 18.7 mmHg in LP). Orthostatic hypotension was most prevalent among participants with motor complete TP (73%). Results from the questionnaire revealed that although participants value exercise and see benefits to regular participation, they have low confidence in their abilities to perform the task of either aerobic or strengthening exercise.
Exercise is well tolerated in adults with subacute SCI. Exercise interventions at this stage should focus on improving task-specific self-efficacy, and attention should be made to blood pressure regulation, particularly in individuals with motor complete TP.
PubMed ID
23747647 View in PubMed
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380 records – page 1 of 38.