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34 records – page 1 of 4.

Source
J Spinal Cord Med. 2012 Sep;35(5):273-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Source
J Spinal Cord Med. 2012 Sep;35(5):273-4
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Ontario
Rehabilitation Centers - trends
Spinal Cord Injuries - rehabilitation
PubMed ID
23031164 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chronic disease self-management for individuals with stroke, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140303
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(13-14):1136-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Robert C Hirsche
Beverly Williams
Allyson Jones
Patricia Manns
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(13-14):1136-46
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Chronic Disease - rehabilitation
Humans
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - rehabilitation
Program Evaluation
Self Care
Self Efficacy
Spinal Cord Injuries - rehabilitation
Stroke - rehabilitation
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of people with neurological conditions who take the chronic disease self-management (CDSM) programme. The CDSM programme is used to teach skills to manage chronic conditions, and prevent secondary conditions. Few studies have explored the use of the CDSM programme with people with neurological conditions, in spite of the long standing and sometimes unpredictable nature of those conditions.
This qualitative study explored the experience of people with stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) who participated in the CDSM programme. We completed individual interviews using a semi-structured interview guide with 22 individuals with stroke, MS and SCI.
Five categories emerged from the interview discussions including: (1) pre-programme influences; (2) group; (3) factors affecting learning opportunities; (4) workshop content and (5) outcomes.
The results of this study provide insights regarding the optimal way to present the CDSM programme to people with neurological conditions.
PubMed ID
20919875 View in PubMed
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[Clinics for spinal cord injuries. "All drivers ought to be Samaritans on the road"].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253008
Source
Nord Med. 1974 Nov;89(9):279-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1974

Community based monitoring for spinal man.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244503
Source
Can J Public Health. 1981 May-Jun;72(3):195-8
Publication Type
Article

Critical psycho-social variables affecting outcome in a regional spinal cord centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109126
Source
Proc Veterans Adm Spinal Cord Inj Conf. 1971;18:193-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1971

A descriptive study on the functioning profile of patients with spinal cord injury in a rehabilitation center in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290765
Source
Spinal Cord. 2017 May; 55(5):489-496
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2017
Author
E Vasilchenko
R Escorpizo
E Filatov
A Kislova
Y Surodeyeva
V Lyachovetskaya
G Zoloyev
Author Affiliation
Neurosurgical Department, Federal State Budgetary Scientific and Practical Centre for Medical and Social Evaluation and Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons in Novokuznetsk, Ministry of Labour and Social Protection of the Russian Federation, Novokuznetsk, Russian Federation.
Source
Spinal Cord. 2017 May; 55(5):489-496
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Paraplegia - rehabilitation
Rehabilitation Centers
Russia
Spinal Cord Injuries - rehabilitation
Young Adult
Abstract
This is a cross-sectional study.
(1) To use the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) profile to assess the functioning of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) admitted to a rehabilitation center; (2) To determine the role of the ICF in the operation of a rehabilitation center in Russia.
This study was conducted in the Federal center for disability rehabilitation in Novokuznetsk, Russia.
Eighty-one patients with SCI (59 men and 22 women; 31 with cervical, 41 with thoracic and 9 with lumbar level of injury) were included in the study. We determined the odds ratios of more pronounced impairments in ICF categories according to the duration of SCI and degree of neurological deficit.
Mean age of patients was 34.9±11.1 years, men/women ratio was 2.7:1 and the median of time from injury was 2.5 (1.5-6) years. On the basis of American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS), most patients had AIS A (N=31, 38.3%). Patients with tetraplegia and AIS A or AIS B were at risk for more significant impairments in b620 'urination functions' and b640 'sexual functions'. Patients with paraplegia and AIS A or AIS B were at risk for more significant impairments in b735 'muscle tone functions'.
Using the ICF, we were able to describe the range and extent of functioning problems experienced by patients with SCI who were admitted in our rehabilitation center. Moreover, the use of the ICF improved the interaction between specialists.
Notes
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Cites: Spinal Cord. 2014 Apr;52(4):268-71 PMID 24492638
Cites: J Spinal Cord Med. 2007;30(2):131-9 PMID 17591225
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2007 Dec 30;29(24):1926-33 PMID 17852230
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Cites: Phys Ther. 1987 Feb;67(2):206-7 PMID 3809245
PubMed ID
27527236 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of interprofessional care plans for spinal cord injury clients through videoconferencing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148947
Source
J Interprof Care. 2010 Jan;24(1):115-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010

Employment after spinal cord injury: the impact of government policies in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161664
Source
Work. 2007;29(2):145-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Lyn Jongbloed
Catherine Backman
Susan J Forwell
Christine Carpenter
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. lynjon@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Work. 2007;29(2):145-54
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Employment - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Female
Government Regulation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Spinal Cord Injuries - rehabilitation
Abstract
The British Columbia Paraplegic Association (BCPA) sought a research partnership to evaluate where its activities should be focused. A survey of members with disabilities of the BCPA included questions on employment and identified three priorities related to employment. These were the need for assistance in finding appropriate work, the impact of policies of government and insurance agencies, and attitudes of employers. This paper examines the social and political environment related to employment following spinal cord injury in British Columbia, Canada. There is no coherent set of goals underlying government employment and income programs in Canada. Incremental development of particular employment and income programs during the 20th century led to a patchwork of policies and programs, which deal with people differently according to the cause of their disability. Federal and provincial governments have attempted to educate employers and reduce barriers to employment of those with disabilities by focusing on anti-discrimination legislation and individual rights (e.g. the Employment Equity Act and the Canadian Human Rights Act). However, people with disabilities face non-accommodating environments, inadequate income support, lack of opportunities and little political influence which stem from an unfair distribution of societal resources, not from discrimination. Joint efforts of the BCPA and other disability organizations are likely to have the most impact on legislative changes.
PubMed ID
17726290 View in PubMed
Less detail

Employment of persons with spinal cord lesions injured more than 20 years ago.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98759
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2009;31(26):2174-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Ingeborg Beate Lidal
Nils Hjeltnes
Jo Røislien
Johan Kvalvik Stanghelle
Fin Biering-Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Sunnaas Rehabilitation Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, 1450 Nesoddtangen, Norway. Ingeborg.lidal@sunnaas.no
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2009;31(26):2174-84
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Proportional Hazards Models
Rehabilitation, Vocational - statistics & numerical data
Spinal Cord Injuries - rehabilitation
Young Adult
Abstract
PURPOSE: The primary objective was to study factors influencing post-injury employment and withdrawal from work in persons who sustained traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) more than 20 years ago. A secondary objective was to study life satisfaction in the same patients. METHOD: A cross-sectional study with retrospective data of 165 SCI-patients admitted to Sunnaas Rehabilitation Hospital 1961-1982. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify predictors for obtaining work post-injury. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to study factors influencing early withdrawal from work, i.e. time from injury until discontinuing employment. RESULTS: Sixty-five percent of the participants were employed at some point after the injury. Thirty-five percent still had work at the time of the survey. The odds of obtaining work after injury were higher in persons of younger age at injury, higher in males versus females, higher for persons with paraplegia versus tetraplegia, and for persons classified as Frankel D-E compared to a more severe SCI. Factors associated with shorter time from injury until discontinuing employment were higher age at injury, incidence of injury after 1975 versus before, and a history of pre-injury medical condition(s). Life satisfaction was better for currently employed participants. CONCLUSION: The study indicates a low employment-rate in persons with SCI, even several years after injury. From the results, we suggest more support, especially to persons of older age at injury and/or with a history of pre-injury medical condition(s), to help them to obtain work and sustain employed for more years after injury.
PubMed ID
19903127 View in PubMed
Less detail

Employment outcomes of adults who sustained spinal cord injuries as children or adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189918
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2002 Jun;83(6):791-801
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Caroline J Anderson
Lawrence C Vogel
Author Affiliation
Shriners Hospital for Children, Chicago, IL 60707, USA. canderson@shrinenet.org
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2002 Jun;83(6):791-801
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Child
Disabled Children - rehabilitation
Employment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Male
Quality of Life
Spinal Cord Injuries - rehabilitation
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
To determine employment outcomes of adults with pediatric-onset spinal cord injury (SCI) and factors associated with those outcomes.
Structured interview, including standardized measures.
Community.
Individuals who sustained an SCI at age 18 years or younger, were 24 years or older at follow-up, did not have a significant brain injury, and were living in the United States or Canada. A total of 195 subjects were interviewed. Mean age at injury was 14 years (0-18 y), mean age at interview was 29 years (24-37 y), and mean duration of injury was 15 years (7-28 y). All participants had been enrolled in SCI programs.
Not applicable.
A structured interview, the FIM instrument, the Craig Handicap Assessment and Recording Technique, the Medical Outcomes Study 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey, and the Satisfaction with Life Scale.
Of the participants, 99 (51%) were employed, 78 (40%) were unemployed, 12 (6%) were students, and 6 (3%) were homemakers. A predictive model of employment identified 4 factors associated with employment: education, community mobility, functional independence, and decreased medical complications. Other variables significantly associated with employment included community integration, independent driving, independent living, higher income, and life satisfaction.
Compared with the general population, the high rate of unemployment among adults with pediatric-onset SCI is a cause for concern. Risk factors associated with adult unemployment provide guidelines for targeting rehabilitation resources and strategies.
PubMed ID
12048657 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.