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Cardiovascular disease and spinal cord injury: results from a national population health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108476
Source
Neurology. 2013 Aug 20;81(8):723-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-2013
Author
Jacquelyn J Cragg
Vanessa K Noonan
Andrei Krassioukov
Jaimie Borisoff
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD), University of British Columbia, Vancouver Canada. craggj@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Neurology. 2013 Aug 20;81(8):723-8
Date
Aug-20-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Causality
Comorbidity
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology
Stroke
Abstract
To evaluate the association between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and spinal cord injury (SCI) in a large representative sample.
Data were compiled from more than 60,000 individuals from the 2010 cycle of the cross-sectional Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine this relationship, adjusting for confounders and using probability weighting to account for the CCHS sampling method.
After adjusting for age and sex, SCI was associated with a significant increased odds of heart disease (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.94-3.82) and stroke (adjusted OR = 3.72, 95% CI 2.22-6.23).
These remarkably heightened odds highlight the exigent need for targeted interventions and prevention strategies addressing modifiable risk factors for CVD in individuals with SCI.
Notes
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Comment In: Neurology. 2013 Aug 20;81(8):700-123884044
PubMed ID
23884034 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of injuries to the cervical spine and spinal cord in polytrauma patient population: experience from a regional trauma unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201106
Source
Spinal Cord. 1999 Aug;37(8):560-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
V S Prasad
A. Schwartz
R. Bhutani
P W Sharkey
M L Schwartz
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Spinal Cord. 1999 Aug;37(8):560-8
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Female
Glasgow Coma Scale
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Trauma - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology
Spinal Injuries - epidemiology
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected trauma database of a Level 1 (tertiary) trauma center.
To define the features of the cervical spinal injuries in polytrauma population admitted to the regional trauma unit.
Canada, Ontario Province, Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center.
All trauma admissions between 1987 and 1996 entered prospectively into a trauma registry database were studied for incidence, demographic and epidemiological details of cervical spine (cord and column) injuries.
A total of 468 patients (66% male) with cervical spinal injury (CSI) from 1198 spinal injuries admitted to the regional trauma center were identified. Seventy-five per cent of the CSI involved were aged less than 50 years; nearly 30% were in the third decade alone. Overall, the commonest spinal level injured was C2 (27%) followed by C5 (22%). Older population (above 60 years of age) had C1 + 2 involved more often than the young (P=0.02). Motor vehicular crashes (MVC) accounted for 71%, followed by pedestrian trauma (10%), sport injuries (7%). Spinal cord injury (SCI) was noted in 27%; complete in 16% and incomplete in 11% and more frequently at C4 or C5 level compared with C1, C2 (P
PubMed ID
10455532 View in PubMed
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A comparison of cervical cancer screening rates among women with traumatic spinal cord injury and the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145976
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2010 Jan;19(1):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Sara J T Guilcher
Alice Newman
Susan B Jaglal
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, Canada.
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2010 Jan;19(1):57-63
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Income
Mass Screening - utilization
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Papanicolaou test
Population Surveillance
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vaginal Smears - utilization
Abstract
Previous qualitative and survey studies have suggested women with spinal cord injury (SCI) are screened less often for cervical cancer compared with the general population. We investigated whether cervical cancer screening rates differ between population-based women with and without traumatic SCI, matched for age and geography.
A double cohort design was used, comparing women with SCI to the general population (1:4) using administrative data for Ontario, Canada. Women with SCI, identified using the Discharge Abstract Database for the fiscal years 1995-1996 to 2001-2002, were female residents of Ontario between the ages of 25 and 66, admitted to an acute care facility with a traumatic SCI (ICD-9 CM code 806 or 952). Women in the general Ontario population were randomly matched by age and geography. Screening rates were calculated from fee codes related to Papanicolaou (Pap) smear tests for a 3-year period preinjury and postinjury.
There were 339 women with SCI matched to 1506 women in the general Ontario population. Screening rates pre-SCI were 55% for women with SCI and 57% during this same time period for matched women in the general population; post-SCI rates were 58% for both the two groups. Factors predicting the likelihood of receiving a Pap test for SCI cases included younger age and higher socioeconomic status.
Utilization data suggest that there are no significant differences in screening rates for women with SCI compared with the general population. However, screening rates for women with SCI were significantly influenced by age as well as income.
PubMed ID
20088659 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology and clinical outcomes of acute spine trauma and spinal cord injury: experience from a specialized spine trauma center in Canada in comparison with a large national registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147469
Source
J Trauma. 2009 Nov;67(5):936-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Deepa Kattail
Julio C Furlan
Michael G Fehlings
Author Affiliation
Spinal Program, Krembil Neuroscience Centre, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2S8, Canada.
Source
J Trauma. 2009 Nov;67(5):936-43
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Registries
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology
Spinal Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Trauma Centers
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Because relevant changes in the epidemiology of the traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) has been reported, we sought to examine the demographics, injury characteristics, and clinical outcomes of patients with spine trauma who have been treated in our spine trauma center.
All consecutive patients with acute spine trauma who were admitted in our center from 1996 to 2007 were included. Comparisons among the four triennia were performed for demographics, injury characteristics, and clinical outcomes. Also, our 2001/2002 SCI data were compared with the National Trauma Registry (NTR) dataset.
There were 569 patients (394 males, 175 females; ages from 15 to 102 years, mean age of 50 years) who were admitted with acute spine trauma. Although demographic profile has been steady over the last four triennia, the frequency of more severe spine trauma at the lumbosacral levels due to falls has increased overtime. The mean length of stay and in-hospital mortality rates have not significantly changed during the past 12 years. Our in-hospital mortality rate (4%) was significantly lower than the provincial rate from the Ontario Trauma Registry (7.5%; p = 0.005). Comparisons between our SCI data and the NTR dataset showed significant differences regarding age groups.
Our results indicate that significant differences in the characteristics of acute spine trauma but not demographics have occurred overtime in our institution. Also, there were significant differences between our database and the NTR regarding age distribution. Our reduced in-hospital mortality rates in comparison with the provincial data reinforce the recommendations for early management of SCI patients in a spine trauma center.
PubMed ID
19901651 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of traumatic spinal cord injury in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169940
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2006 Apr 1;31(7):799-805
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2006
Author
Gwynedd E Pickett
Mauricio Campos-Benitez
Jana L Keller
Neil Duggal
Author Affiliation
London Health Sciences Centre, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2006 Apr 1;31(7):799-805
Date
Apr-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
Retrospective review.
To describe the incidence, clinical features, and treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) treated at a Canadian tertiary care center.
Understanding the current epidemiology of acute traumatic SCI is essential for public resource allocation and primary prevention. Recent reports suggest that the mean age of patients with SCI may be increasing.
We retrospectively reviewed hospital records on all patients with traumatic SCI between January 1997 and June 2001 (n = 151). Variables assessed included age, gender, length of hospitalization, type and mechanism of injury, associated spinal fractures, neurologic deficit, and treatment.
Annual age-adjusted incidence rates were 42.4 per million for adults aged 15-64 years, and 51.4 per million for those 65 years and older. Motor vehicle accidents accounted for 35% of SCI. Falls were responsible for 63% of SCI among patients older than 65 years and for 31% of injuries overall. Cervical SCI was most common, particularly in the elderly, and was associated with fracture in only 56% of cases. Thoracic and lumbar SCI were associated with spinal fractures in 100% and 85% of cases, respectively. In-hospital mortality was 8%. Mortality was significantly higher among the elderly. Treatment of thoracic and lumbar fractures associated with SCI was predominantly surgical, whereas cervical fractures were equally likely to be treated with external immobilization alone or with surgery.
A large proportion of injuries was seen among older adults, predominantly as a result of falls. Prevention programs should expand their focus to include home safety and avoidance of falls in the elderly.
PubMed ID
16582854 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1969 Apr 26;100(16):764-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-1969
Author
A F Huston
C. Smith
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1969 Apr 26;100(16):764-9
Date
Apr-26-1969
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Accidents, Occupational
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Agriculture
Amputation
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Saskatchewan
Sex Factors
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - mortality
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jan 29;94(5):228-345902238
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1967 Sep;58(9):417-246074310
Cites: Concours Med. 1963 Feb 16;85:1037-4114027182
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1964 May 9;90:1099-10414143678
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1964 Sep 26;91:675-8014201260
Cites: Br Med J. 1965 Jul 10;2(5453):63-614305367
PubMed ID
5780746 View in PubMed
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Incidence of traumatic paraplegia and tetraplegia in Norway: a statistical survey of the years 1974 and 1975.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41673
Source
Paraplegia. 1978 May;16(1):88-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1978
Author
R. Gjone
L. Nordlie
Source
Paraplegia. 1978 May;16(1):88-93
Date
May-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cauda Equina - injuries
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Paraplegia - epidemiology
Quadriplegia - epidemiology
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
A survey based on interviews with all Norwegian hospitals, 62 in number, showed that in 1974 and 1975 respectively 65 and 66 traumatic spinal cord and cauda equina lesions were treated in Norway, a total of 131 or 16 . 5/million inhabitants/year.
PubMed ID
733291 View in PubMed
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Incidence of traumatic spinal cord injuries in Finland over a 30-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156788
Source
Spinal Cord. 2008 Dec;46(12):781-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
E. Ahoniemi
H. Alaranta
E-M Hokkinen
K. Valtonen
H. Kautiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Spinal Cord, Käpylä Rehabilitation Centre, Finnish Association of People with Mobility Disabilities, Helsinki, Finland. eija.ahoniemi@invalidiliitto.fi
Source
Spinal Cord. 2008 Dec;46(12):781-4
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Causality
Comorbidity
Data Collection - standards
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Paralysis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Quadriplegia - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Register survey.
To provide national Finnish data on the incidence of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) over a 30-year period.
Käpylä Rehabilitation Centre, Helsinki, Finland.
Patients aged 16 years and older who sustained a TSCI between 1976 and 2005 were identified using the registers of the Käpylä Rehabilitation Centre.
The medical records of a total of 1647 patients (1362 men and 285 women) were analyzed. The mean annual incidence rate for the entire population was 13.8/1 000 000. Age-adjusted incidence did not change among men or women during the three decades, but the mean age at injury of both men (from 34.7 to 42.4 years) and women (from 35.8 to 40.4 years) increased. The annual incidence of new TSCI rose significantly in persons 55 years and older. The proportion of tetraplegia and of incomplete injuries increased, too.
Although TSCI is predominantly present in young men, more attention for primary prevention, medical care and rehabilitation in men and women aged 55 years and older is needed. An international uniformity in methodology to collect epidemiological data of TSCI is needed.
PubMed ID
18542095 View in PubMed
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Meeting the privacy requirements for the development of a multi-centre patient registry in Canada: the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107862
Source
Healthc Policy. 2013 May;8(4):87-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Vanessa K Noonan
Nancy P Thorogood
Phalgun B Joshi
Michael G Fehlings
B Catharine Craven
Gary Linassi
Daryl R Fourney
Brian K Kwon
Christopher S Bailey
Eve C Tsai
Brian M Drew
Henry Ahn
Deborah Tsui
Marcel F Dvorak
Author Affiliation
Director of Research, Rick Hansen Institute, Vancouver, BC.
Source
Healthc Policy. 2013 May;8(4):87-99
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Canada - epidemiology
Computer Security
Confidentiality
Health Policy
Humans
Informed consent
Registries - standards
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
Privacy legislation addresses concerns regarding the privacy of personal information; however, its interpretation by research ethics boards has resulted in significant challenges to the collection, management, use and disclosure of personal health information for multi-centre research studies. This paper describes the strategy used to develop the national Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR) in accordance with privacy statutes and benchmarked against best practices. An analysis of the regional and national privacy legislation was conducted to determine the requirements for each of the 31 local RHSCIR sites and the national RHSCIR office. A national privacy and security framework was created for RHSCIR that includes a governance structure, standard operating procedures, training processes, physical and technical security and privacy impact assessments. The framework meets a high-water mark in ensuring privacy and security of personal health information nationally and may assist in the development of other national or international research initiatives.
Notes
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Cites: BMJ. 2009;338:b86619282440
PubMed ID
23968640 View in PubMed
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22 records – page 1 of 3.