Skip header and navigation

Refine By

31 records – page 1 of 4.

alpha-Synuclein pathology in the spinal cord autonomic nuclei associates with alpha-synuclein pathology in the brain: a population-based Vantaa 85+ study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146471
Source
Acta Neuropathol. 2010 Jun;119(6):715-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Minna Oinas
Anders Paetau
Liisa Myllykangas
Irma-Leena Notkola
Hannu Kalimo
Tuomo Polvikoski
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Helsinki University Central Hospital,University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, Haartmaninkatu 3, 00014 Helsinki, Finland. minna.oinas@helsinki.fi
Source
Acta Neuropathol. 2010 Jun;119(6):715-22
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged, 80 and over
Autonomic Nervous System - metabolism - pathology
Brain - metabolism - pathology
Brain Diseases - metabolism - pathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Male
Neuropil - metabolism - pathology
Sacrococcygeal Region
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Cord - metabolism - pathology
Spinal Cord Diseases - metabolism - pathology
Thoracic Vertebrae
alpha-Synuclein - metabolism
Abstract
In most subjects with Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, alpha-synuclein (alphaS) immunoreactive pathology is found not only in the brain but also in the autonomic nuclei of the spinal cord. However, neither has the temporal course of alphaS pathology in the spinal cord in relation to the brain progression been established, nor has the extent of alphaS pathology in the spinal cord been analyzed in population-based studies. Using immunohistochemistry, the frequency and distribution of alphaS pathology were assessed semiquantitatively in the brains and spinal cord nuclei of 304 subjects who were aged at least 85 in the population-based Vantaa 85+ study. alphaS pathology was common in the spinal cord; 102 (34%) subjects had classic alphaS pathology in the thoracic and/or sacral autonomic nuclei. Moreover, 134 (44%) subjects showed grain- or dot-like immunoreactivity in neuropil (mini-aggregates) without classic Lewy neurites or Lewy bodies (LBs). The latter type of alphaS accumulation is associated with age, but also the classic alphaS pathology was found more often in the oldest compared to the youngest age group. The severity of alphaS pathology in the spinal cord autonomic nuclei is significantly associated with the extent and severity of alphaS pathology in the brain. Of the subjects, 60% with moderate to severe thoracic alphaS pathology and up to 89% with moderate to severe sacral alphaS pathology had diffuse neocortical type of LB pathology in the brain. alphaS pathology exclusively in the spinal cord was rare. Our study indicates that in general alphaS pathology in the spinal cord autonomic nuclei is associated with similar pathology in the brain.
PubMed ID
20037761 View in PubMed
Less detail

The average cost of pressure ulcer management in a community dwelling spinal cord injury population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123254
Source
Int Wound J. 2013 Aug;10(4):431-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Brian C Chan
Natasha Nanwa
Nicole Mittmann
Dianne Bryant
Peter C Coyte
Pamela E Houghton
Author Affiliation
Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int Wound J. 2013 Aug;10(4):431-40
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Health Care Costs
Hospital Costs
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Readmission - economics
Pilot Projects
Pressure Ulcer - economics - etiology - therapy
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - diagnosis - economics
Young Adult
Abstract
Pressure ulcers (PUs) are a common secondary complication experienced by community dwelling individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). There is a paucity of literature on the health economic impact of PU in SCI population from a societal perspective. The objective of this study was to determine the resource use and costs in 2010 Canadian dollars of a community dwelling SCI individual experiencing a PU from a societal perspective. A non-comparative cost analysis was conducted on a cohort of community dwelling SCI individuals from Ontario, Canada. Medical resource use was recorded over the study period. Unit costs associated with these resources were collected from publicly available sources and published literature. Average monthly cost was calculated based on 7-month follow-up. Costs were stratified by age, PU history, severity level, location of SCI, duration of current PU and PU surface area. Sensitivity analyses were also carried out. Among the 12 study participants, total average monthly cost per community dwelling SCI individual with a PU was $4745. Hospital admission costs represented the greatest percentage of the total cost (62%). Sensitivity analysis showed that the total average monthly costs were most sensitive to variations in hospitalisation costs.
PubMed ID
22715990 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian C-spine Rule and the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Low-Risk Criteria for C-spine radiography in young trauma patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151052
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2009 May;44(5):987-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Peter F Ehrlich
Christopher Wee
Robert Drongowski
Ankur R Rana
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Section of Pediatric Surgery, The University of Michigan Medical School and The CS Mott Children's Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. pehrlich@med.umich.edu
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2009 May;44(5):987-91
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Cervical Vertebrae - injuries - radiography
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Decision Support Techniques
Diagnostic Errors - prevention & control
Emergencies
Humans
Infant
Neck Injuries - radiography
Radiography - standards - utilization
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Sensitivity and specificity
Spinal Cord Injuries - radiography
Spinal Fractures - radiography
Unnecessary Procedures
Abstract
The Canadian C-spine (cervical spine) Rule (CCR) and the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Low-Risk Criteria (NLC) are criteria designed to guide C-spine radiography in trauma patients. It is unclear how these 2 rules compare with young children.
This study retrospectively examined case-matched trauma patients 10 years or younger. Two cohorts were identified-cohort A where C-spine imaging was performed and cohort B where no imaging was conducted. The CCR and NLC criteria were then applied retrospectively to each cohort.
Cohort A contained 125 cases and cohort B with 250 cases. Seven patients (3%) had significant C-spine injuries. In cohort A, NLC criteria could be applied in 108 (86.4%) of 125 and CCR in 109 (87.2%) of 125. National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Low-Risk Criteria suggested that 70 (58.3%) cases required C-spine imaging compared to 93 (76.2%) by CCR. National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Low-Risk Criteria missed 3 C-spine injuries, and CCR missed one. In cohort B, NLC criteria could be applied in 132 (88%) of 150 and CCR in 131 (87.3%) of 150. The NLC criteria identified 8 cases and CCR identified 13 cases that would need C-spine radiographs. Fisher's 2-sided Exact test demonstrated that CCR and NLC predictions were significantly different (P = .002) in both cohorts. The sensitivity of CCR was 86% and specificity was 94%, and the NLC had a sensitivity of 43% and a specificity of 96%.
Although CCR and NLC criteria may reduce the need for C-spine imaging in children 10 years and younger; they are not sensitive or specific enough to be used as currently designed.
PubMed ID
19433184 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical characteristics of multiple sclerosis in Västerbotten County in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71067
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2004 May;75(5):711-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
P. Sundström
A. Svenningsson
L. Nyström
L. Forsgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. peter.sundstrom@neuro.umu.se
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2004 May;75(5):711-6
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age of Onset
Brain - pathology
Brain Stem - pathology
Catchment Area (Health)
Cerebellum - pathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - classification - epidemiology - pathology
Optic Nerve - pathology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Spinal Cord - pathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Most clinical data for multiple sclerosis are hospital based-that is, derived from patients referred to clinics specialising in the disease. OBJECTIVES: To present data derived from two population based multiple sclerosis populations, an incidence cohort and a prevalence population, from Västerbotten County, northern Sweden. METHODS: The two populations were identified from multiple sources, and case ascertainment was assured through a personal clinical review, including interviews and examination of the patients. RESULTS: Characteristics at onset for the different clinical subtypes of multiple sclerosis are presented, including the clinical spectrum of the first attack, the anatomical correlation between the first and second attacks, sex distribution, and disability distribution. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the comparison of present and earlier natural history data, multiple sclerosis appears to be a slightly more benign disease than previously recognised.
PubMed ID
15090565 View in PubMed
Less detail

A comparison of cervical cancer screening rates among women with traumatic spinal cord injury and the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145976
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2010 Jan;19(1):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Sara J T Guilcher
Alice Newman
Susan B Jaglal
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, Canada.
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2010 Jan;19(1):57-63
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Income
Mass Screening - utilization
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Papanicolaou test
Population Surveillance
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vaginal Smears - utilization
Abstract
Previous qualitative and survey studies have suggested women with spinal cord injury (SCI) are screened less often for cervical cancer compared with the general population. We investigated whether cervical cancer screening rates differ between population-based women with and without traumatic SCI, matched for age and geography.
A double cohort design was used, comparing women with SCI to the general population (1:4) using administrative data for Ontario, Canada. Women with SCI, identified using the Discharge Abstract Database for the fiscal years 1995-1996 to 2001-2002, were female residents of Ontario between the ages of 25 and 66, admitted to an acute care facility with a traumatic SCI (ICD-9 CM code 806 or 952). Women in the general Ontario population were randomly matched by age and geography. Screening rates were calculated from fee codes related to Papanicolaou (Pap) smear tests for a 3-year period preinjury and postinjury.
There were 339 women with SCI matched to 1506 women in the general Ontario population. Screening rates pre-SCI were 55% for women with SCI and 57% during this same time period for matched women in the general population; post-SCI rates were 58% for both the two groups. Factors predicting the likelihood of receiving a Pap test for SCI cases included younger age and higher socioeconomic status.
Utilization data suggest that there are no significant differences in screening rates for women with SCI compared with the general population. However, screening rates for women with SCI were significantly influenced by age as well as income.
PubMed ID
20088659 View in PubMed
Less detail

Demographics of the Dutch multicenter prospective cohort study 'Restoration of mobility in spinal cord injury rehabilitation'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82806
Source
Spinal Cord. 2006 Nov;44(11):668-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
de Groot S.
Dallmeijer A J
Post M W M
van Asbeck F W A
Nene A V
Angenot E L D
van der Woude L H V
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Source
Spinal Cord. 2006 Nov;44(11):668-75
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Demography
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Movement - physiology
Netherlands - epidemiology
Physical Therapy Modalities
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function - physiology
Sex Factors
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Time Factors
Wheelchairs
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: A multicenter prospective cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To compare the demographic data of the included population with other studied spinal cord injury (SCI) populations in the international literature. SETTING: Eight Dutch rehabilitation centers with a specialized SCI unit. METHODS: A total of 205 individuals with SCI participated in this study. Information about personal, lesion and rehabilitation characteristics were collected at the beginning of active rehabilitation by means of a questionnaire. RESULTS: The research group mainly consisted of men (74%), of individuals with a paraplegia (59%), and had a complete lesion (68%). The SCI was mainly caused by a trauma (75%), principally due to a traffic accident (42%). The length of clinical rehabilitation varied between 2 months and more than a year, which seemed to be dependent on the lesion characteristics and related comorbidity. CONCLUSIONS: The personal and lesion characteristics of the subjects of the multi-center study were comparable to data of other studies, although fewer older subjects and subjects with an incomplete lesion were included due to the inclusion criteria 'age' and 'wheelchair-dependent'. The length of stay in rehabilitation centers in The Netherlands was longer compared to Denmark but much longer than in eg Australia and the USA.
PubMed ID
16462822 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depression following traumatic spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9201
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2005;25(2):55-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Donna M Dryden
L Duncan Saunders
Brian H Rowe
Laura A May
Niko Yiannakoulias
Lawrence W Svenson
Donald P Schopflocher
Donald C Voaklander
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Rural and Remote Health Research Institute, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC, Canada. ddryden@ualberta.ca
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2005;25(2):55-61
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Depression - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - psychology
Wounds and Injuries
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe the epidemiology of depression following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and identify risk factors associated with depression. METHODS: This population-based cohort study followed individuals from date of SCI to 6 years after injury. Administrative data from a Canadian province with a universal publicly funded health care system and centralized databases were used. A Cox proportional hazards model was developed to identify risk factors. RESULTS: Of 201 patients with SCI, 58 (28.9%) were treated for depression. Individuals at highest risk were those with a pre-injury history of depression [hazard rate ratio (HRR) 1.6; 95% CI: 1.1-2.3], a history of substance abuse (HRR 1.6; 95% CI: 1.2-2.3) or permanent neurological deficit (HRR 1.6; 95% CI: 1.2-2.1). CONCLUSION: Depression occurs commonly and early in persons who sustain an SCI. Both patient and injury factors are associated with the development of depression. These should be used to target patients for mental health assessment and services during initial hospitalization and following discharge into the community.
Notes
Comment In: Neuroepidemiology. 2005;25(2):53-415947490
PubMed ID
15947491 View in PubMed
Less detail

Direct health care costs after traumatic spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171919
Source
J Trauma. 2005 Aug;59(2):443-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Donna M Dryden
L Duncan Saunders
Phillip Jacobs
Donald P Schopflocher
Brian H Rowe
Laura A May
Niko Yiannakoulias
Lawrence W Svenson
Donald C Voaklander
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Canada. ddryden@ualberta.ca
Source
J Trauma. 2005 Aug;59(2):443-9
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - economics - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - economics - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Home Care Services - economics
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Long-Term Care - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Office Visits - economics
Spinal Cord Injuries - economics
Abstract
The objective was to quantify direct health care costs attributable to traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI).
This population-based cohort study followed individuals with SCI from date of injury to 6 years postinjury. SCI cases were matched to a comparison group randomly selected from the general population. Administrative data from a Canadian province with a universal publicly funded health care system and centralized health databases were used. Costs included hospitalizations, physician services, home care, and long-term care.
Attributable costs in the first year were $121,600 (2002 $CDN) per person with a complete SCI, and $42,100 per person with an incomplete injury. In the subsequent 5 years, annual costs were $5,400 and $2,800 for persons with complete and incomplete SCIs, respectively.
Direct costs in the first year after SCI are substantial. In the subsequent 5 years, individuals with SCI will continue to accrue greater costs than the general public.
PubMed ID
16294090 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early versus late surgery for traumatic spinal cord injury: the results of a prospective Canadian cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124604
Source
Spinal Cord. 2012 Nov;50(11):840-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
J R Wilson
A. Singh
C. Craven
M C Verrier
B. Drew
H. Ahn
M. Ford
M G Fehlings
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery and Spinal Program, University of Toronto, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Spinal Cord. 2012 Nov;50(11):840-3
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cohort Studies
Decompression, Surgical - methods
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Neurosurgical Procedures - methods
Recovery of Function
Spinal Cord Injuries - surgery
Time
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A multicenter Canadian cohort study.
The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of early versus late surgical decompression on motor neurological recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI).
Canadian acute care and SCI rehabilitation facilities.
A prospective cohort study of patients within the Ontario Spinal Cord Injury Registry program was performed. We considered SCI patients with an admission American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grade of A through D, with magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed spinal cord compression. Grouped analysis was performed comparing the cohort of patients who received early surgery (
PubMed ID
22565550 View in PubMed
Less detail

Establishing evidence-based physical activity guidelines: methods for the Study of Health and Activity in People with Spinal Cord Injury (SHAPE SCI).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162323
Source
Spinal Cord. 2008 Mar;46(3):216-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
K A Martin Ginis
A E Latimer
A C Buchholz
S R Bray
B C Craven
K C Hayes
A L Hicks
M A McColl
P J Potter
K. Smith
D L Wolfe
Author Affiliation
Department of Kinesiology, Centre for Health Promotion and Rehabilitation, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. martink@mcmaster.ca
Source
Spinal Cord. 2008 Mar;46(3):216-21
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - etiology - physiopathology
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Interviews as Topic
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity - etiology - physiopathology
Ontario
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - physiopathology
Abstract
Prospective, observational cohort study.
This paper describes the rationale and methodology for the Study of Health and Activity in People with Spinal Cord Injury (SHAPE SCI). The study aims to (1) describe physical activity levels of people with different injury levels and completeness, (2) examine the relationship between physical activity, risk and/or presence of secondary health complications and risk of chronic disease, and (3) identify determinants of physical activity in the SCI population.
Ontario, Canada.
Seven hundred and twenty men and women who have incurred a traumatic SCI complete self-report measures of physical activity, physical activity determinants, secondary health problems and subjective well-being during a telephone interview. A representative subsample (n=81) participate in chronic disease risk factor testing for obesity, insulin resistance and coronary heart disease. Measures are taken at baseline, 6 and 18 months.
SHAPE SCI will provide much-needed epidemiological information on physical activity patterns, determinants and health in people with SCI. This information will provide a foundation for the establishment of evidence-based physical activity guidelines and interventions tailored to the SCI community.
PubMed ID
17646838 View in PubMed
Less detail

31 records – page 1 of 4.