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25 years or more after spinal cord injury: clinical conditions of individuals in the Florence and Stockholm areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129470
Source
Spinal Cord. 2012 Mar;50(3):243-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
L. Werhagen
S. Aito
L. Tucci
J. Strayer
C. Hultling
Author Affiliation
Karolinska institutet Danderyds Sjukhus, Department of clinical sciences, Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyds hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. lars.werhagen @ki.se
Source
Spinal Cord. 2012 Mar;50(3):243-6
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ethnic Groups
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Italy
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - etiology - therapy
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Retrospective analysis and retrospective follow-up.
Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients have today a nearly normal lifespan. Avoidance of medical complications is key to this end. The aim of the study was to analyse health in individuals surviving 25 years or more after traumatic SCI in Stockholm and Florence, and compare medical complications.
Data from the databases of the Spinal Unit of Florence and from the Spinalis, Stockholm were analysed. Patients included were C2-L 2, American Spinal Cord Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) A-C, and =25 years post traumatic SCI. Patients underwent a thorough neurological and general examination, and were interviewed about medical events during those years. Analysed data include: gender, age at injury, current age, neurological level, AIS, cause of injury, presence of neuropathic pain (NP), and spasticity and medical complications.
A total of 66 Italian patients and 74 Swedish patients were included. The only statistical difference between the groups was cause of injury due to falls was higher in the Florence group (P
PubMed ID
22105457 View in PubMed
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Abdominal pain in long-term spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86843
Source
Spinal Cord. 2008 Mar;46(3):198-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Finnerup N B
Faaborg P.
Krogh K.
Jensen T S
Author Affiliation
Danish Pain Research Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. finnerup@ki.au.dk
Source
Spinal Cord. 2008 Mar;46(3):198-203
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - etiology - physiopathology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Colon - physiopathology
Constipation - complications - physiopathology
Denmark
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Rectum - physiopathology
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - physiopathology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe the prevalence and character of chronic abdominal pain in a group of patients with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess predictors of abdominal pain. STUDY DESIGN: Postal survey. SETTING: Members of the Danish Paraplegic Association. METHODS: We mailed a questionnaire to 284 members of the Danish Paraplegic Association who met the inclusion criteria (member for at least 10 years). The questionnaire contained questions about cause and level of spinal injury, colorectal function and pain/discomfort. RESULTS: Seventy percent returned the questionnaire (133 men and 70 women). Mean age was 47 years. Thirty-four percent reported having chronic abdominal pain or discomfort. Onset of pain was later than 5 years after their SCI in 53%. Low defecation frequency was more common in patients with abdominal pain/discomfort and constipation more often affected their quality of life compared to patients without abdominal pain/discomfort. The most common descriptors were annoying, cramping/tightening, tender, sickening and shooting/jolting. There was no relation to age, time since injury or level of injury, but more women than men reported abdominal pain/discomfort. There was no relation of abdominal pain to other types of pain. CONCLUSION: Chronic pain located in the abdomen is frequent in patients with long-term SCI. The delayed onset following SCI and the relation to constipation suggest that constipation plays an important role for this type of pain in the spinal cord injured.
PubMed ID
17621311 View in PubMed
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Aging, spinal cord injury, and quality of life: structural relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184088
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2003 Aug;84(8):1137-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Mary Ann McColl
Robert Arnold
Susan Charlifue
Clive Glass
Gordana Savic
Hans Frankel
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. mccollm@post.queensu.ca
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2003 Aug;84(8):1137-44
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada - epidemiology
Colorado - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
England - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Abstract
To quantify relationships among 3 sets of factors: demographic factors, health and disability factors, and quality of life (QOL).
Part of a program of longitudinal research on aging and spinal cord injury (SCI) involving 3 populations: American, British, and Canadian. The present analysis uses data from the 1999 interval.
The Canadian sample was derived from the member database of the Ontario and Manitoba divisions of the Canadian Paraplegic Association. The British sample was recruited from a national and a regional SCI center in England. The American sample was recruited through a hospital in Colorado.
A sample of 352 participants was assembled from 4 large, well-established databases. The sample included individuals who had incurred an SCI at least 20 years earlier, were admitted to rehabilitation within 1 year of injury, and were between the ages of 15 and 55 at the time of injury.
Not applicable.
A combination of self-completed questionnaires and interviews. Data included demographics, injury-related variables, health and disability-related factors, QOL, and perceptions about aging.
Using linear structural relationships modeling, we found that QOL was affected both directly and indirectly by age, health and disability problems, and perceptions of aging. Two surprising findings were as follows: those who experienced fewer disability-related problems were more likely to report a qualitative disadvantage in aging, and the younger members of the sample were more likely to report fatigue.
Fatigue is a concern because of the relationship of fatigue with perceived temporal disadvantage in aging, health problems, and disability problems. This finding highlights the need for clinical vigilance among those just beginning to experience the effects of aging.
PubMed ID
12917851 View in PubMed
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alpha-Synuclein pathology in the spinal cord autonomic nuclei associates with alpha-synuclein pathology in the brain: a population-based Vantaa 85+ study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146471
Source
Acta Neuropathol. 2010 Jun;119(6):715-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Minna Oinas
Anders Paetau
Liisa Myllykangas
Irma-Leena Notkola
Hannu Kalimo
Tuomo Polvikoski
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Helsinki University Central Hospital,University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, Haartmaninkatu 3, 00014 Helsinki, Finland. minna.oinas@helsinki.fi
Source
Acta Neuropathol. 2010 Jun;119(6):715-22
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged, 80 and over
Autonomic Nervous System - metabolism - pathology
Brain - metabolism - pathology
Brain Diseases - metabolism - pathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Male
Neuropil - metabolism - pathology
Sacrococcygeal Region
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Cord - metabolism - pathology
Spinal Cord Diseases - metabolism - pathology
Thoracic Vertebrae
alpha-Synuclein - metabolism
Abstract
In most subjects with Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, alpha-synuclein (alphaS) immunoreactive pathology is found not only in the brain but also in the autonomic nuclei of the spinal cord. However, neither has the temporal course of alphaS pathology in the spinal cord in relation to the brain progression been established, nor has the extent of alphaS pathology in the spinal cord been analyzed in population-based studies. Using immunohistochemistry, the frequency and distribution of alphaS pathology were assessed semiquantitatively in the brains and spinal cord nuclei of 304 subjects who were aged at least 85 in the population-based Vantaa 85+ study. alphaS pathology was common in the spinal cord; 102 (34%) subjects had classic alphaS pathology in the thoracic and/or sacral autonomic nuclei. Moreover, 134 (44%) subjects showed grain- or dot-like immunoreactivity in neuropil (mini-aggregates) without classic Lewy neurites or Lewy bodies (LBs). The latter type of alphaS accumulation is associated with age, but also the classic alphaS pathology was found more often in the oldest compared to the youngest age group. The severity of alphaS pathology in the spinal cord autonomic nuclei is significantly associated with the extent and severity of alphaS pathology in the brain. Of the subjects, 60% with moderate to severe thoracic alphaS pathology and up to 89% with moderate to severe sacral alphaS pathology had diffuse neocortical type of LB pathology in the brain. alphaS pathology exclusively in the spinal cord was rare. Our study indicates that in general alphaS pathology in the spinal cord autonomic nuclei is associated with similar pathology in the brain.
PubMed ID
20037761 View in PubMed
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Assessment of autonomic function after acute spinal cord injury using heart rate variability analyses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265934
Source
Spinal Cord. 2015 Jan;53(1):54-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
L. Malmqvist
T. Biering-Sørensen
K. Bartholdy
A. Krassioukov
K-L Welling
J H Svendsen
A. Kruse
B. Hansen
F. Biering-Sørensen
Source
Spinal Cord. 2015 Jan;53(1):54-8
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Autonomic Nervous System Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Cervical Vertebrae - pathology
Denmark
Female
Fourier Analysis
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Linear Models
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Spinal Cord Injuries - classification - complications
Thoracic Vertebrae - pathology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in severe dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. C1-C8 SCI affects the supraspinal control to the heart, T1-T5 SCI affects the spinal sympathetic outflow to the heart, and T6-T12 SCI leaves sympathetic control to the heart intact. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis can serve as a surrogate measure of autonomic regulation. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in HRV patterns and alterations in patients with acute traumatic SCI.
As soon as possible after SCI patients who met the inclusion criteria had 24?h Holter monitoring of their cardiac rhythm, additional Holter monitoring were performed 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks after SCI.
Fifty SCI patients were included. A significant increase in standard deviation of the average normal-to-normal (SDANN) sinus intervals was seen in the first month after injury (P=0.008). The increase was only significant in C1-T5 incomplete patients and in patients who did not experience one or more episodes of cardiac arrest. Significant lower values of Low Frequency Power, Total Power and the Low Frequency over High Frequency ratio were seen in the C1-T5 SCI patients compared with T6-T12 SCI patients.
The rise in SDANN in the incomplete C1-T5 patients could be due to spontaneous functional recovery caused by synaptic plasticity or remodelling of damaged axons. That the autonomic nervous system function differs between C1-C8, T1-T5 and T6-T12 patients suggest that the sympathovagal balance in both the C1-C8 and T1-T5 SCI patients has yet to be reached.
PubMed ID
25403499 View in PubMed
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Cannabis use in persons with traumatic spinal cord injury in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281302
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2017 Jan 31;49(2):152-160
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-2017
Author
Sven R Andresen
Fin Biering-Sørensen
Ellen Merete Hagen
Jørgen F Nielsen
Flemming W Bach
Nanna B Finnerup
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2017 Jan 31;49(2):152-160
Date
Jan-31-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cannabis - chemistry
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - drug therapy
Spinal Cord Injuries - drug therapy - rehabilitation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate recreational and medical cannabis use in individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury, including reasons and predictors for use, perceived benefits and negative consequences.
Cross-sectional survey in Denmark.
A 35-item questionnaire was sent to 1,101 patients with spinal cord injury who had been in contact with a rehabilitation centre between 1990 and 2012.
A total of 537 participants completed the questionnaire. Of these, 36% had tried cannabis at least once and 9% were current users. Of current users, 79% had started to use cannabis before their spinal cord injury. The main reason for use was pleasure, but 65% used cannabis partly for spinal cord injury-related consequences and 59% reported at least good effect on pain and spasticity. Negative consequences of use were primarily inertia and feeling quiet/subdued. Lower age, living in rural areas/larger cities, tobacco-smoking, high alcohol intake and higher muscle stiffness were significantly associated with cannabis use. Those who had never tried cannabis reported that they would mainly use cannabis to alleviate pain and spasticity if it were legalized.
Cannabis use is more frequent among individuals with spinal cord injury in Denmark than among the general population. High muscle stiffness and various demographic characteristics (lower age, living in rural areas/larger cities, tobacco-smoking and high alcohol intake) were associated with cannabis use. Most participants had started using cannabis before their spinal cord injury. There was considerable overlap between recreational and disability-related use.
PubMed ID
28101559 View in PubMed
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Centralized spinal cord injury care in Finland: unveiling the hidden incidence of traumatic injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267440
Source
Spinal Cord. 2014 Oct;52(10):779-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
E A Koskinen
M. Alen
E M Väärälä
J. Rellman
M. Kallinen
A. Vainionpää
Source
Spinal Cord. 2014 Oct;52(10):779-84
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Rehabilitation Centers - statistics & numerical data
Spinal Cord Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Population-based prospective study.
To determine the incidence and evaluate the characteristics of newly injured patients with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) admitted to two of the three national spinal cord injury (SCI) centers during the first year after the centralization of SCI care in Finland.
Oulu and Tampere University Hospital SCI centers, Finland.
The designated rehabilitation teams evaluated all of the patients with a new SCI and persisting neurological symptoms. The data were recorded according to the International Spinal Cord Injury Core Data Set.
In a 1-year period, 77 new patients with TSCI were admitted to the study centers serving a population of 3?065?946. In the whole catchment area, the mean annual incidence of TSCI was 25.1 per million, and in the hospital districts of the SCI centers, the incidence was even higher, at 38.1 per million. The mean age of the patients was 58.7 years. Falls were the leading cause of injury (64.9%), and the injury resulted in tetraplegia in 70.1% of the cases. Alcohol use was a contributing factor in 39% of the cases in the entire sample and in 58.6% of cases among patients aged younger than 60 years.
The incidence rates of TSCI were markedly higher than expected, demonstrating the previously hidden morbidity. The epidemiological features of TSCI appeared to follow the trends in developed countries, highlighting the increasing incidence of cervical lesions due to falling among the elderly. The results need to be confirmed in an extended follow-up.
PubMed ID
25112968 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of injuries to the cervical spine and spinal cord in polytrauma patient population: experience from a regional trauma unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201106
Source
Spinal Cord. 1999 Aug;37(8):560-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
V S Prasad
A. Schwartz
R. Bhutani
P W Sharkey
M L Schwartz
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Spinal Cord. 1999 Aug;37(8):560-8
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Female
Glasgow Coma Scale
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Trauma - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology
Spinal Injuries - epidemiology
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected trauma database of a Level 1 (tertiary) trauma center.
To define the features of the cervical spinal injuries in polytrauma population admitted to the regional trauma unit.
Canada, Ontario Province, Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center.
All trauma admissions between 1987 and 1996 entered prospectively into a trauma registry database were studied for incidence, demographic and epidemiological details of cervical spine (cord and column) injuries.
A total of 468 patients (66% male) with cervical spinal injury (CSI) from 1198 spinal injuries admitted to the regional trauma center were identified. Seventy-five per cent of the CSI involved were aged less than 50 years; nearly 30% were in the third decade alone. Overall, the commonest spinal level injured was C2 (27%) followed by C5 (22%). Older population (above 60 years of age) had C1 + 2 involved more often than the young (P=0.02). Motor vehicular crashes (MVC) accounted for 71%, followed by pedestrian trauma (10%), sport injuries (7%). Spinal cord injury (SCI) was noted in 27%; complete in 16% and incomplete in 11% and more frequently at C4 or C5 level compared with C1, C2 (P
PubMed ID
10455532 View in PubMed
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Chronic abdominal pain in long-term spinal cord injury: a follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280974
Source
Spinal Cord. 2017 Mar;55(3):290-293
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
S D Nielsen
P M Faaborg
P. Christensen
K. Krogh
N B Finnerup
Source
Spinal Cord. 2017 Mar;55(3):290-293
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Constipation - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Self Report
Sex Factors
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Abstract
A longitudinal postal survey.
To evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of abdominal pain in long-term spinal cord injury (SCI).
Members of the Danish SCI Association.
In 2006, a questionnaire on chronic abdominal pain and discomfort was sent to the 284 members of the Danish SCI association who had been members for at least 10 years; 203 of them responded. An almost identical questionnaire including questions on intensity and interference of pain within the past 7 days, as well as descriptors and treatment, was sent to the 178 surviving members in 2015.
Of 130 (73%) responders, 125 answered the question on chronic abdominal pain. The mean time since injury was 30.5 (9.8) years. Chronic abdominal pain or discomfort was reported by 32.8% (41/125), and 23% (29/125) of responders had been at least moderately bothered by this in the past week. Abdominal pain or discomfort was more common in women and in those with self-reported constipation. The median intensity (numeric rating scale) was 6.0 (range 3-10) and it was often associated with autonomic symptoms. Nine (8%) of the 115 individuals who responded in both 2006 and 2015 had developed new abdominal pain or discomfort, 30 (26%) no longer reported it, and 28 (24%) reported it at both time points with a similar intensity.
Chronic abdominal pain or discomfort is common and bothersome in long-term SCI. It has a late onset, but the prevalence and severity do not seem to further increase between 20 and 30 years following SCI.
PubMed ID
27502843 View in PubMed
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Client-centred assessment and the identification of meaningful treatment goals for individuals with a spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181319
Source
Spinal Cord. 2004 May;42(5):302-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
C. Donnelly
J J Eng
J. Hall
L. Alford
R. Giachino
K. Norton
D S Kerr
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation Research Laboratory, GF Strong Rehab Centre, and School of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Spinal Cord. 2004 May;42(5):302-7
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Disability Evaluation
Female
Goals
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life - psychology
Retrospective Studies
Self Care - statistics & numerical data
Sickness Impact Profile
Spinal Cord Injuries - psychology - rehabilitation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Retrospective analysis.
(1) Describe the self-care, productivity and leisure problems identified by individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI) during rehabilitation, (2) describe the perceived level of satisfaction and performance with self-care, productivity and leisure activities following an SCI, (3) quantify the relationship between the Canadian occupational performance measure (COPM), a client-centred, individualized measure of function, and the functional independence measure (FIM).
Tertiary rehabilitation centre, spinal cord injury unit, GF Strong Rehabilitation Centre, Vancouver, Canada.
Health records from 41 individuals with an SCI admitted between 2000 and 2002 were reviewed. Information was obtained from assessments performed on admission and discharge. Self-care, productivity and leisure problems identified by individuals with an SCI were described and their perceived level of performance and satisfaction was calculated. The relationship between the COPM and the FIM was measured by the Pearson product correlation.
Self-care goals were identified most frequently (79%) followed by productivity (12%) and leisure (9%) goals. The top three problems identified by individuals with an SCI were functional mobility (including transfers and wheelchair use), dressing and grooming. A fair relationship was found between the COPM and the FIM (r between 0.351 and 0.514, P
Notes
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PubMed ID
14993893 View in PubMed
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76 records – page 1 of 8.