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13 records – page 1 of 2.

Changes in epidemiology of acute spinal cord injury from 1947 to 1981.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220371
Source
Surg Neurol. 1993 Sep;40(3):207-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
C H Tator
E G Duncan
V E Edmonds
L I Lapczak
D F Andrews
Author Affiliation
Spinal Cord Injury Treatment, Research and Prevention Centre, Toronto Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Surg Neurol. 1993 Sep;40(3):207-15
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine whether there have been epidemiologic changes in acute spinal cord injury. Two groups of patients injured in the same geographic area were compared: the first group of 351 patients was injured between 1947 and 1973; and the second group of 201 patients between 1974 and 1981. The results showed that there were indeed major epidemiologic changes in spinal cord injury between the two study periods. Most importantly, the more recently injured group were younger, arrived sooner, had less severe cord injuries, and higher frequencies of motor vehicle, and sports and recreational accidents, but fewer work-related injuries.
Notes
Comment In: Surg Neurol. 1994 Sep;42(3):2787940121
PubMed ID
8346474 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of the ThinkFirst Canada, Smart Hockey, brain and spinal cord injury prevention video.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182249
Source
Inj Prev. 2003 Dec;9(4):361-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
D J Cook
M D Cusimano
C H Tator
M L Chipman
Author Affiliation
Injury Prevention Research Office, St Michael's Hospital, Division of Neurosurgery, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Inj Prev. 2003 Dec;9(4):361-6
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Audiovisual Aids
Brain Concussion - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Hockey - injuries
Humans
Male
Ontario
Program Evaluation
Spinal Cord Injuries - etiology - prevention & control
Videotape Recording
Abstract
The ThinkFirst Canada Smart Hockey program is an educational injury prevention video that teaches the mechanisms, consequences, and prevention of brain and spinal cord injury in ice hockey. This study evaluates knowledge transfer and behavioural outcomes in 11-12 year old hockey players who viewed the video.
Randomized controlled design.
Greater Toronto Minor Hockey League, Toronto Ontario.
Minor, competitive 11-12 year old male ice hockey players and hockey team coaches.
The Smart Hockey video was shown to experimental teams at mid-season. An interview was conducted with coaches to understand reasons to accept or refuse the injury prevention video.
A test of concussion knowledge was administered before, immediately after, and three months after exposure to the video. The incidence of aggressive penalties was measured before and after viewing the video.
The number of causes and mechanisms of concussion named by players increased from 1.13 to 2.47 and from 0.67 to 1.22 respectively. This effect was maintained at three months. There was no significant change in control teams. There was no significant change in total penalties after video exposure; however, specific body checking related penalties were significantly reduced in the experimental group.
This study showed some improvements in knowledge and behaviours after a single viewing of a video; however, these findings require confirmation with a larger sample to understand the sociobehavioural aspects of sport that determine the effectiveness and acceptance of injury prevention interventions.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Dec 22-29;282(24):2328-3210612320
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Cites: Clin J Sport Med. 2001 Jul;11(3):144-911495318
Cites: J Neurosurg. 2001 Nov;95(5):859-7011702878
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 Dec;33(12):2004-911740291
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 2002 Jan-Feb;30(1):39-4411798994
Cites: Clin J Sport Med. 2002 Jan;12(1):6-1111854582
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2002 Feb;36(1):27-3211867489
Cites: J Neurosurg. 2003 Mar;98(3):477-8412650417
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Apr 1;130(7):875-806704840
Cites: Can J Surg. 1991 Feb;34(1):63-91997150
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1992 Jun;146(6):741-71595632
Cites: Can J Ophthalmol. 1992 Aug;27(5):226-91393806
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand. 1993 Aug;64(4):459-618213128
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1996 Feb;150(2):140-58556117
Cites: Clin J Sport Med. 1996 Apr;6(2):108-118673567
Cites: Clin J Sport Med. 1997 Jan;7(1):17-219117520
Cites: BMJ. 1997 Sep 6;315(7108):6009302962
Cites: Clin J Sport Med. 2001 Jan;11(1):23-3111176142
PubMed ID
14693901 View in PubMed
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Hockey injuries of the spine in Canada, 1966-1996.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198981
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Mar 21;162(6):787-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-21-2000
Author
C H Tator
J D Carson
R. Cushman
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Mar 21;162(6):787-8
Date
Mar-21-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Hockey - injuries
Humans
Incidence
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Spinal Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Oct 4;113(7):663-6, 6741181024
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Apr 1;130(7):875-806704840
Cites: Clin J Sport Med. 1996 Apr;6(2):108-118673567
Comment In: CMAJ. 2000 Mar 21;162(6):792-310750467
PubMed ID
10750464 View in PubMed
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Management of acute spinal cord injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240540
Source
Can J Surg. 1984 May;27(3):289-93, 296
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1984
Author
C H Tator
D W Rowed
M L Schwartz
S D Gertzbein
N. Bharatwal
M. Barkin
V E Edmonds
Source
Can J Surg. 1984 May;27(3):289-93, 296
Date
May-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Hospital Units
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Neck
Ontario
Patient Admission
Spinal Cord Injuries - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Traction - methods
Urinary Catheterization - methods
Abstract
This report describes the results achieved in 144 patients with spinal cord injury admitted during the period 1974 to 1979 to the Acute Spinal Cord Injury Unit of Sunnybrook Medical Centre in Toronto. Several innovations have been made. These are based on a systems analysis approach to care and documentation. It includes epidemiologic studies of, and programs for, urologic and respiratory management and the use of halo devices. The unit has achieved a marked reduction in both mortality and morbidity. Patients have been transferred to the unit earlier after trauma and have been discharged earlier to rehabilitation hospitals partly because of the coordination of the acute and rehabilitation phases of care. There has been a marked reduction in the cost of care, because of fewer complications and a shorter stay in the acute hospital. The study confirms the advantages of regionalization and specialization in the field of acute spinal cord injury.
PubMed ID
6722677 View in PubMed
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National survey of spinal injuries in hockey players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240637
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Apr 1;130(7):875-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1984
Author
C H Tator
V E Edmonds
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Apr 1;130(7):875-80
Date
Apr-1-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control - radiography
Canada
Cervical Vertebrae - injuries - radiography
Child
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - prevention & control - radiography
Hockey
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Muscles
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control - radiography
Spinal Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control - radiography
Sports
Violence
Abstract
There has been an alarming increase in the number of spinal injuries in hockey players. Between 1976 and 1983, 42 were reported to the Committee on Prevention of Spinal Injuries due to Hockey. The median age of the injured players was 17 years. Of the 42 players 28 had spinal cord injuries, and 17 of them had complete paralysis below the vertebral level of the injury. Strikes from behind and collisions with the boards were common mechanisms of injury. Many of the players had suffered a burst fracture of the cervical spine following a blow to the top of the helmet when the neck was slightly flexed. The committee studied a number of possible etiologic factors and made several recommendations regarding prevention. League officials, coaches, players and equipment manufacturers can all play a role in prevention.
Notes
Cites: Clin Neurosurg. 1964;12:226-365865042
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1968 Dec 28;99(25):1234-95700851
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1975;(109):50-81132205
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Oct 4;113(7):663-6, 6741181024
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1977 Feb;4(2):225-7839166
Cites: Surg Gynecol Obstet. 1978 Oct;147(4):513-7705570
Cites: JAMA. 1979 Apr 6;241(14):1477-9430685
Cites: Med Sci Sports. 1979 Summer;11(2):138-45491870
Cites: Can J Surg. 1979 Nov;22(6):575-8497931
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 1980 Sep-Oct;8(5):302-97416346
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 1980 Sep-Oct;8(5):310-77416347
Cites: Paraplegia. 1981;19(5):303-127279434
Cites: Can J Appl Sport Sci. 1983 Mar;8(1):19-256850973
Cites: Can J Neurol Sci. 1984 Feb;11(1):34-416704792
Cites: JAMA. 1961 Aug 12;177:362-713748251
Cites: JAMA. 1964 May 4;188:418-2214125216
PubMed ID
6704840 View in PubMed
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Neurological recovery, mortality and length of stay after acute spinal cord injury associated with changes in management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215268
Source
Paraplegia. 1995 May;33(5):254-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
C H Tator
E G Duncan
V E Edmonds
L I Lapczak
D F Andrews
Author Affiliation
Spinal Cord Injury Treatment, Research and Prevention Centre, Toronto Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Paraplegia. 1995 May;33(5):254-62
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Canada
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Models, Statistical
Regression Analysis
Spinal Cord Injuries - classification - mortality - rehabilitation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Based on epidemiological data from two populations of patients with acute spinal cord injury (ASCI), three outcome measures were compared to evaluate the effectiveness of management of ASCI patients in a regional, specialized acute spinal cord injury unit (ASCIU). The two populations consisted of a pre-ASCIU group of 351 patients managed from 1947-73 before the establishment of the ASCIU, and an ASCIU group of 201 patients managed in an ASCIU from 1974-81. The three outcome measures were mortality rate, length of stay (LOS) during first hospitalization, and neurological recovery. Linear regression and multiple regression analyses were used to determine whether differences in the outcome measures were attributable to differences in admission variables in addition to the influence of the ASCIU. The results showed that the patients treated in the ASCIU had a significant reduction in the mortality rate of almost 50% (P = 0.022), a significant reduction in the LOS of almost 50% (P
PubMed ID
7630650 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 1997 Jan;7(1):17-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
C H Tator
J D Carson
V E Edmonds
Author Affiliation
SportSmart Canada, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 1997 Jan;7(1):17-21
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Dislocations - epidemiology
Female
Fractures, Bone - classification - epidemiology
Hockey - injuries
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Spinal Injuries - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Survival Rate
Abstract
In this study, we wished to examine the nature and incidence of major spinal injuries sustained by ice hockey players and to add reported cases to a permanent registry.
The study was a retrospective review of questionnaires returned by physicians reporting spinal injuries due to ice hockey.
Canada primarily, with reported cases from other nations.
Two hundred forty-one cases of fracture or dislocation of the spine have been reported.
The registry includes annual incidence and mortality incidence as well as documentation of sex, age, mechanism of injury, vertebral level of injury, neurologic deficit, type of event, and type of fracture for most cases.
Between 1982 and 1993, an average of 16.8 ice hockey related major spinal injuries were reported each year. Many of these injuries occurred to the cervical spine of players aged 16-20 years who were playing in supervised games.
Prevention programs are beginning to become effective in decreasing the number of severe injuries and the number of injuries caused by a check from behind, although there has not been a significant decrease in the total number of injuries reported annually.
PubMed ID
9117520 View in PubMed
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Prevention of spinal cord injuries caused by diving: evaluation of the distribution and usage of a diving safety video in high schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198047
Source
Inj Prev. 2000 Jun;6(2):154-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
V M Bhide
V E Edmonds
C H Tator
Author Affiliation
SportSmart Canada and Think First Canada, Toronto Western Hospital and University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Inj Prev. 2000 Jun;6(2):154-6
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Diving - injuries
Health education
Humans
Ontario
Program Evaluation
School Health Services
Spinal Cord Injuries - prevention & control
Students
Video Recording
Abstract
To determine and assess the distribution and use of Sudden Impact, a video designed by Think First and SportsSmart Canada, to help prevent spinal cord injury caused by careless shallow water diving among teenagers in the high risk group (15-24 years old).
Survey of 92 public secondary schools in Toronto, Canada.
The heads of the physical and health education departments of the 92 secondary public schools in the Metropolitan Toronto region.
The response rate was 64% (59 schools), of which 76% (45) had actually received the video. Forty one schools (91%) of those that received the video reported using it. Eighty per cent of responding schools showed it to grade 11 students. Eighty per cent of schools with swimming pools used the video compared with only 42% of schools without swimming pools.
There is a need for improvements in the system of distribution to ensure greater use of material such as this video. These may include direct distribution to principals, continuing contact with the schools, or mandatory inclusion of diving safety into the school curriculum.
PubMed ID
10875676 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Surg. 1985 Mar;28(2):165-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1985
Author
C E Ekong
C H Tator
Source
Can J Surg. 1985 Mar;28(2):165-7
Date
Mar-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Abstract
Of 144 patients with spinal cord injury admitted to the Sunnybrook Medical Centre from 1974 to 1979, 25 (24 men) (17.4%) had sustained their injuries at work. The 25 patients ranged in age from 20 to 56 years, with more than half being in their third decade of life. Work-related spinal cord injury was more frequent in the thoracic region than spinal injuries from other causes. The injuries were generally severe, 24% of them being complete cord injuries (i.e., no sensory or motor function below the level of injury). The mean neurologic grade of these patients did not change substantially between the time of admission and discharge. The mortality was 8%. The pattern of spinal cord injury in this series was compared to that in the period 1948 to 1973, when 105 (29.3%) of 358 spinal cord injuries occurred at work, constituting the second most frequent cause of acute spinal cord injury, after traffic accidents. In the current series, only 17.4% sustained their injuries at work. This was the third most common cause of spinal injuries in this period after traffic accidents and sports-recreational injuries. Falls in industry were the most frequent mode of work injury from 1974 to 1979, compared with construction accidents in the earlier period. The number of work-related spinal cord injuries is still too high. Furthermore, the severe neurologic damage suffered and the lack of substantial improvement emphasize the importance of preventive efforts, especially in industry. The fact that work injuries now rank third as a relative cause of spinal injury may indicate an absolute decline in this type of injury, especially among construction workers.
PubMed ID
3971241 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.