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38 records – page 1 of 4.

An occupational therapist as a sexual health clinician in the management of spinal cord injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240114
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1984 Oct;51(4):172-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1984
Author
W T Miller
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1984 Oct;51(4):172-5
Date
Oct-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Humans
Occupational Therapy - standards
Role
Spinal Cord Injuries - therapy
Abstract
The Sexual Health Clinician is a health care specialist who is able to assess the sexual potential of physically disabled persons and assist them in the development of acceptable alternatives in sexual practices. This specialty role was first developed at the Spinal Cord Injury Unit, Shaughnessy Hospital in Vancouver, B.C., Canada, to answer a need of spinal cord injured patients, their partners and family. The opportunity to join the Service arose in May, 1981 following one year as the Senior Occupational Therapist on the Spinal Cord Injury Unit. This paper, which describes the experience of an occupational therapist as a member of the Sexual Health Service, is presented in five brief parts: 1. a background history; 2. a description of the sexual problems of the spinal cord injured and the goals of rehabilitation in this area; 3. the role of the Sexual Health Clinician; 4. the strengths and limitations of Occupational Therapy in this new role; 5. a brief discussion of the the need for a sex-related role and curriculum for students of Occupational Therapy.
PubMed ID
10268922 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of amyoplasia with gastroschisis, bowel atresia, and defects of the muscular layer of the trunk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236750
Source
Am J Med Genet. 1986 Aug;24(4):701-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1986
Author
C O Reid
J G Hall
C. Anderson
M. Bocian
J. Carey
T. Costa
C. Curry
F. Greenberg
W. Horton
M. Jones
Source
Am J Med Genet. 1986 Aug;24(4):701-10
Date
Aug-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Muscles - abnormalities - blood supply
Abnormalities, Multiple - embryology - epidemiology
Anterior Horn Cells - pathology
Arthrogryposis - epidemiology
British Columbia
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intestinal Atresia - epidemiology
Intestines - blood supply
Pregnancy
Spinal Cord - blood supply
Stomach - abnormalities
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
We reviewed 225 cases of amyoplasia, and the association of amyoplasia with gastroschisis and with monozygotic twinning was confirmed. In addition, an apparently increased association of bowel atresia and defects in the muscular layer of the trunk wall with amyoplasia was observed. The association of amyoplasia, monozygotic twinning, and these trunk wall defects strongly suggests that the pathogenesis of amyoplasia is linked to some type of vascular compromise.
PubMed ID
2943157 View in PubMed
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Cervical spinal cord astrocytoma in a dog.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26110
Source
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1987 Jul 1;191(1):84-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1987
Author
T M Neer
J M Kreeger
Source
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1987 Jul 1;191(1):84-6
Date
Jul-1-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Astrocytoma - pathology - veterinary
Dog Diseases - pathology
Dogs
Female
Lameness, Animal - etiology
Spinal Cord Neoplasms - pathology - veterinary
Abstract
An astrocytoma of the cervical spinal cord was diagnosed in a 3-year-old Siberian Husky. The dog had an 8-week history of progressive neurologic deficits that finally resulted in nonambulatory tetraparesis. Neurologic examination, CSF analysis, myelography, exploratory laminectomy and histopathologic examination were performed. Intramedullary spinal cord tumors such as astrocytomas are rare, and this case illustrates the manner in which spinal cord tumors may be confused with other nervous system diseases, both from a clinical and clinicopathologic standpoint.
PubMed ID
3610786 View in PubMed
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Cervical spine injuries in rugby players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240706
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Mar 15;130(6):735-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1984
Author
O M Sovio
P K Van Peteghem
J F Schweigel
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Mar 15;130(6):735-6
Date
Mar-15-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - radiography
British Columbia
Cervical Vertebrae - injuries - radiography
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quadriplegia - etiology
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Nine patients with serious cervical spine injuries that occurred while they were playing rugby were seen in a British Columbia acute spinal cord injury unit during the period 1975-82. All the injuries had occurred during the "scrum" or the "tackle". Two of the patients were rendered permanently quadriplegic, and one patient died. There is a need for a central registry that would record all cervical spine injuries in rugby players as well as for changes in the rules of the game.
Notes
Cites: Ir Med J. 1981 Dec;74(12):377-97319776
Cites: S Afr Med J. 1977 Apr 2;51(14):473-5870992
Cites: Practitioner. 1979 Sep;223(1335):365-6514967
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 1981 Mar;15(1):56-97248685
PubMed ID
6697282 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Clinical picture and histopathology of Viliuisk encephalomyelitis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242329
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1983;83(2):204-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
A P Avtsyn
I A Prokhorova
A A Zhavoronkov
L G Gol'dfarb
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1983;83(2):204-8
Date
1983
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Vessels - pathology
Brain - pathology
Encephalomyelitis - pathology
Female
Humans
Lymphocytes - pathology
Macrophages - pathology
Male
Meninges - pathology
Meningoencephalitis - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Rural Population
Siberia
Spinal Cord - pathology
Abstract
Clinical and histological study of 8 cases of Vilyui encephalomyelitis (VEM), characterized by chronic and acute course has shown that all the features of local non-purulent encephalomyelitis with marked dystrophic and atrophic changes of neural tissue were characteristic of VEM. Immunomorphological reaction that manifested as perivascular and membrane lymphoplasmacytic infiltrations was observed in patients with a more acute VEM course or with exacerbation of chronic VEM. Hydrocephalus is considered as a serious aggravating factor that favours atrophic nervous changes during protracted and chronic VEM course.
PubMed ID
6858478 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical presentation of spinal cord concussion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231430
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1989 Jan;14(1):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1989
Author
M R Del Bigio
G E Johnson
Author Affiliation
Section of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1989 Jan;14(1):37-40
Date
Jan-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Retrospective Studies
Spinal Cord Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Spinal cord concussion is a transient disturbance of spinal cord function, with or without vertebral damage and no demonstrable pathologic changes, that results from a rapid change in velocity following trauma, and resolves within 48 hours. In a retrospective review of patients with spinal injury referred to a tertiary care center, spinal cord concussion was observed in 3.7% of patients. Thirteen cases are presented. A variety of clinical presentations may occur, all of which can be explained on the basis of the magnitude or direction of acceleration of the spinal cord. The cervical cord is most commonly affected, but concussion can occur at any level of the spinal cord. Spinal cord concussion is often associated with pre-existing vertebral abnormalities that result in narrowing of the spinal canal or areas of hypermobility.
PubMed ID
2913666 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of central nervous system neoplasms. A regional survey in Central Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240770
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1984 Mar;69(3):129-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1984
Author
R. Fogelholm
T. Uutela
K. Murros
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1984 Mar;69(3):129-36
Date
Mar-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - secondary
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Spinal Cord Neoplasms - epidemiology - secondary
Abstract
An epidemiologic survey of central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms in Central Finland revealed a total of 367 neoplasms, 298 of which were diagnosed during 1975-82, the remaining being diagnosed earlier. Histological verification was available in 83% of intracranial and 90% of intraspinal neoplasms. 14% of the intracranial neoplasms diagnosed during 1975-82 were found incidentally at autopsy. Metastases corresponded to 18% of all CNS neoplasms. Age- and sex-adjusted annual incidence rates for primary and metastatic intracranial neoplasms were 12.3 and 3.4/100,000, and for intraspinal neoplasms 1.3 and 0.7/100,000, respectively. The total incidence of all CNS neoplasms was 17.7/100,000/year. Of the different types of intracranial neoplasms, meningiomas were more frequent among women than among men with a ratio of 8:1; metastases were more common among men with a ratio of 2.5:1. For primary intracranial neoplasms, point prevalences (January 1, 1983) were 65.9/100,000 and intraspinal neoplasms 9.1/100,000. The corresponding period prevalences for 1982 were 73.7 and 9.5/100,000.
PubMed ID
6609517 View in PubMed
Less detail

Epidemiology of motor neuron disease in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241772
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1983 Jul;68(1):20-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1983
Author
L. Forsgren
B G Almay
G. Holmgren
S. Wall
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1983 Jul;68(1):20-9
Date
Jul-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Neurons
Muscular Atrophy - epidemiology
Neuromuscular Diseases - epidemiology
Paralysis - epidemiology
Spinal Cord Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden
Abstract
All cases of motor neuron disease (MND), encompassing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), progressive bulbar paralysis (PBP) and progressive spinal muscular atrophy (PSMA), in northern Sweden, diagnosed between 1969-1980 have been analysed. 128 cases were found, corresponding to an average annual incidence rate of 1.67 per 100,000. The prevalence on December 31, 1980 was 4.8 per 100,000. Age-specific incidence rates were higher in the high age groups with a maximum at 60-64 years for males, at 70-74 years for females and at 65-69 years for the sexes combined. The median age at onset was 61 years. Clustering was not found in mining districts and overrepresentation of miners and stone treaters was not observed. Minor differences in incidence rates, as measured by the standardized morbidity ratio, SMR, were found between the inland, coastal and mountain areas. The median survival time after onset of disease was 32 months for ALS, 30 months for PBP and 70 months for PSMA. The combined survival rate for all MND cases was 28% after 5 years and 15% after 10 years. The male to female ratio was 1.1:1, and 4.7% were familial cases.
PubMed ID
6604389 View in PubMed
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38 records – page 1 of 4.