Skip header and navigation

Refine By

44 records – page 1 of 5.

Anomalies and pathologies of the Sadlermiut Eskimo vertebral column.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1690
Source
National Museum of Canada Bulletin. 180:154-180.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1960
Author
Merbs, C.F.
Wilson, W.H.
Author Affiliation
University of Wisconsin
Source
National Museum of Canada Bulletin. 180:154-180.
Date
1960
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Spina bifida
Spondylolysis
Vertebral fusion
Fractures
Degenerative joint disease
Laminal exostoses
Osteophytosis
Osteoporosis
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 187.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 1105.
Less detail

Are 'upper' and 'lower' neural tube defects aetiologically different?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232865
Source
J Med Genet. 1988 Jul;25(7):503-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1988
Author
M F Frecker
F C Fraser
W D Heneghan
Source
J Med Genet. 1988 Jul;25(7):503-4
Date
Jul-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anencephaly - genetics
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neural Tube Defects - etiology - genetics - pathology
Newfoundland and Labrador
Spina Bifida Occulta - genetics
Notes
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 1979;3(4):377-87382853
Cites: J Med Genet. 1983 Feb;20(1):78-96842541
Cites: Teratology. 1987 Dec;36(3):355-613321520
Cites: Teratology. 1986 Jun;33(3):299-3033738823
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 1985 May;21(1):13-204003438
PubMed ID
3050096 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association of twinning and neural tube defects: studies in Los Angeles, California, and Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65783
Source
Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma). 1982;31(3-4):165-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
G C Windham
T. Bjerkedal
L E Sever
Source
Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma). 1982;31(3-4):165-72
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
California
Diseases in Twins
Encephalocele - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Neural Tube Defects - epidemiology
Norway
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sex Factors
Spina Bifida Occulta - epidemiology
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
Accurate, unbiased malformation rates in twins must be obtained unselectively from population-based studies that include livebirths and stillbirths after a thorough ascertainment of cases. This type of study was conducted in Los Angeles County, California, where 28 twins with a neural tube defect (NTD) were identified. The prevalence in twins (1.6/1,000) was significantly higher than in singletons (1.1/1,000). The study then was expanded to include population-based data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway which has a comparable overall NTD prevalence (1.0/1,000) and twinning rate (2%). The combined material shows a higher prevalence of anencephaly and encephalocele but not of spina bifida in twins compared to singletons. The male/female ratios in total twin and singleton cases were comparable (0.8), but varied by specific defect. Like-sex twin females appeared at highest risk for NTD as well as for fetal death. This study supports theories which associate NTDs with monozygotic twins, either through developmental disruptions that cause susceptibility to environmental agents or through a common etiology. Furthermore, it suggests that twins and singletons differ in their response to etiologic factors for the development of NTDs and that the development of each type of NTD may be related to different factors.
PubMed ID
6763438 View in PubMed
Less detail

Birth prevalence and recurrence rates of neural tube defects in southern Alberta in 1970-81.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233139
Source
CMAJ. 1988 May 1;138(9):819-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1988
Author
N Y Thunem
R B Lowry
B J Tucker
B W Medd
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary.
Source
CMAJ. 1988 May 1;138(9):819-23
Date
May-1-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Anencephaly - epidemiology - genetics
Encephalocele - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Neural Tube Defects - epidemiology - genetics
Pregnancy
Spina Bifida Occulta - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
Given the observed variation in birth prevalence and recurrence rates of neural tube defects, it is important to obtain such data specific to a given locality for research and genetic counseling purposes. A review of hospital medical charts, the patient lists of the Medical Genetics and Myelomeningocele clinics at Alberta Children's Hospital and data from the Canadian Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System revealed the annual birth prevalence rate of neural tube defects in southern Alberta in 1970-81 to be 1.62/1000 total births. This figure suggests southern Alberta to be a low-frequency area. There was no significant variation in the annual rates of spina bifida, encephalocele or all neural tube defects combined over the study period. A significant linear decline in the frequency of births of anencephalic infants, however, was noted (p = 0.025). Information on the total reproductive history of the mothers revealed that the empiric risk of recurrence of a neural tube defect was 2.2%, and the risk to all siblings was estimated to be 2.3%. In future prevalence studies multiple sources of case ascertainment should be used, including data on pregnancies terminated because of a fetal neural tube defect.
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1974 Oct;100(4):288-964607703
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1975 Nov-Dec;66(6):471-61203827
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 1979;3(4):377-87382853
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 1980;5(3):309-147405962
Cites: Lancet. 1981 Nov 7;2(8254):1032-56118487
Cites: Pediatrics. 1982 Sep;70(3):333-77050874
Cites: Lancet. 1983 Jan 1;1(8314-5):64-56129391
Cites: Lancet. 1983 Jan 1;1(8314-5):656129393
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Nov 15;129(10):1109-106354411
Cites: Lancet. 1984 Sep 22;2(8404):701-26147729
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 1984 Sep;19(1):45-636388330
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 Nov 3;289(6453):1182-46437477
Cites: J Med Genet. 1984 Dec;21(6):413-66512828
Cites: Hum Genet. 1985;70(1):74-93873392
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1985 Jul;122(1):197-84014198
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 1985 Nov;60(11):1086-913907511
Cites: Teratology. 1986 Jun;33(3):299-3033738823
Cites: CMAJ. 1986 Dec 1;135(11):1269-733536051
PubMed ID
3282629 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bone mineral and histological variation with age and vertebral pathology in two human skeletal populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature991
Source
Ph.D. thesis. University of Connecticut, Storrs. 361 pp. University Microfilms International 8106696.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
1980
Author
Gunness-Hey, M.E.
Author Affiliation
University of Connecticut
Source
Ph.D. thesis. University of Connecticut, Storrs. 361 pp. University Microfilms International 8106696.
Date
1980
Geographic Location
U.S.
Multi-National
Publication Type
Dissertation
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Bone cortical density
Bone mineral content
Trabecular bone loss
Spondylolysis
Spina bifida
Osteophytosis
Osteoarthritis
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 151. UAF - Rasmuson Library E98.A55 G86 1984 ALASKA
Less detail

Chemicals, birth defects and stillbirths in New Brunswick: associations with agricultural activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233605
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Jan 15;138(2):117-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1988
Author
F M White
F G Cohen
G. Sherman
R. McCurdy
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, Halifax.
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Jan 15;138(2):117-24
Date
Jan-15-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Adolescent
Adult
Agriculture
Anencephaly - chemically induced - epidemiology
Canada
Cleft Lip - chemically induced - epidemiology
Cleft Palate - chemically induced - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure
Female
Fetal Death - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Kidney - abnormalities
Male
Maternal Age
New Brunswick
Pesticides - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Spina Bifida Occulta - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
We describe a series of investigations that were conducted in support of the Task Force on Chemicals in the Environment and Human Reproductive Problems in New Brunswick. Geographic and temporal analyses and case-control studies, with the use of vital statistics, hospital records, the Canadian Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System and chemical databases, revealed no association between pesticides used in forestry and reproductive problems. Evidence of an association between the potential exposure to agricultural chemicals and three major anomalies combined as well as spina bifida without hydrocephalus was found. More plausible was an association between stillbirths and such exposure during the second trimester of pregnancy. This finding, along with the cyclic patterns of stillbirth in the agricultural Saint John River basin and the somewhat higher stillbirth rates in New Brunswick than in adjacent provinces or in Canada as a whole, suggests that further attention should focus on possible associations between agricultural activity and stillbirths.
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1976 Feb;103(2):226-351251836
Cites: Teratology. 1979 Jun;19(3):377-83473090
Cites: Proc R Soc Med. 1965 May;58:295-30014283879
Cites: CMAJ. 1987 Feb 15;136(4):329-323815193
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1984 Apr;119(4):473-866711537
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1982 Jul-Aug;37(4):197-2007114899
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1982 May;115(5):695-7137081201
Cites: Environ Res. 1982 Feb;27(1):74-87067682
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1981 Sep-Oct;36(5):213-216271079
PubMed ID
3275483 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Children with meningomyelocele become adults!]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29428
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Sep 12-18;102(37):2566-70
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sven Mattsson
Gunilla Gladh
Author Affiliation
Barn och ungdomsmedicinska kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset i Linköping, Sweden. sven.mattsson@lio.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Sep 12-18;102(37):2566-70
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Continuity of Patient Care
English Abstract
Humans
Meningomyelocele - mortality - psychology - rehabilitation
Patient Care Planning
Spina Bifida Cystica - mortality - psychology - rehabilitation
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The survival for children with spina bifida has dramatically increased during the last 30 years. In Sweden today 40-50 adolescents with spina bifida are reaching adulthood each year the next 10 years. Children with spina bifida are from birth to adulthood followed by a multidisciplinary medical and paramedical team within the habilitation organisation. However, from the age of 18 this responsibility is discontinued, often with less readiness in adult medicine to meet the spina bifida adolescents and their special needs. Facing adolescence and adulthood both children and parents need a careful preparation from several points of view for the transition. It is also most important to prepare the adult medical disciplines about the special needs of this group. This process has to start early to reach successful management, including improvement in self-care.
PubMed ID
16200903 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clusters of malformations in Sweden: a study with central registers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60406
Source
Environ Res. 1983 Apr;30(2):466-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1983
Author
A. Ericson
B. Källén
P. Westerholm
Source
Environ Res. 1983 Apr;30(2):466-79
Date
Apr-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Spina Bifida Occulta - epidemiology
Sweden
Abstract
Clustering of malformations and especially of spina bifida in Sweden was studied using the Register of Malformations and the Medical Birth Records Register. The incentive to this study was provided by the observation of a cluster of malformations, notably spina bifida, and perinatal deaths, locally thought to be related to the use of herbicides in forestry. This cluster was verified but it was shown that a high rate of spina bifida existed in the region before the introduction of herbicides in forestry. Some other clusters of spina bifida were identified and also a number of clusters of other malformations. Case-history studies were performed but revealed no lead to an explanation. Principles in the origin of the clusters and their analysis are discussed.
PubMed ID
6339233 View in PubMed
Less detail

44 records – page 1 of 5.