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The acrylamide intake via some common baby food for children in Sweden during their first year of life--an improved method for analysis of acrylamide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29785
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2005 Jun;43(6):951-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
P. Fohgelberg
J. Rosén
K-E Hellenäs
L. Abramsson-Zetterberg
Author Affiliation
National Food Administration, Toxicology Division, Box 622, 75126 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2005 Jun;43(6):951-9
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - analysis
Animals
Chromatography, Liquid
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Infant, Newborn
Milk - chemistry
Milk, human - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Sweden
Abstract
The acrylamide levels in breast milk and the main categories of Swedish baby food products, i.e. breast milk substitute (infant formula), gruel, porridge and canned baby food, have been analysed. Furthermore, the acrylamide intake from these products by children up to one year of age has been estimated. Other kind of foods e.g. biscuits, are not included. Because of the expected low concentrations of acrylamide, a new sample extraction method for detection by liquid chromatography, tandem mass spectrometry, was developed and validated. The lower limit of quantification was 0.5 microg kg(-1) for liquid samples and 2 microg kg(-1) for other samples. The average levels found for gruel, porridge and canned baby food, all ready to eat, were 1.4, 26, and 7.8 microg/kg respectively. We found great variations in the acrylamide levels between and in different food categories,
PubMed ID
15811575 View in PubMed
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Activation of the immune system and systemic immune-complex deposits in Brown Norway rats with dental amalgam restorations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72544
Source
J Dent Res. 1998 Jun;77(6):1415-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
P. Hultman
U. Lindh
P. Hörsted-Bindslev
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Environment, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
J Dent Res. 1998 Jun;77(6):1415-25
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Antibody Formation - drug effects
Antigen-Antibody Complex - analysis - blood
Autoimmune Diseases - chemically induced
Autoimmunity
Body Burden
Comparative Study
Copper - analysis
Dental Amalgam - toxicity
Dinitrobenzenes
Female
Immune Complex Diseases - chemically induced
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Laminin
Lymphocyte Activation - drug effects
Mercury - analysis - blood - pharmacokinetics
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Silver - analysis
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Statistics, nonparametric
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
Dental amalgam restorations are a significant source of mercury exposure in the human population, but their potential to cause systemic health effects is highly disputed. We examined effects on the immune system by giving genetically mercury-susceptible Brown Norway (BN) rats and mercury-resistant Lewis (LE) rats silver amalgam restorations in 4 molars of the upper jaw, causing a body burden similar to that described in human amalgam-bearers (from 250 to 375 mg amalgam/kg body weight). BN rats with amalgam restorations, compared with control rats given composite resinous restorations, developed a rapid activation of the immune system, with a maximum 12-fold increase of the plasma IgE concentration after 3 wks (p 0.05). After 12 wks, BN rats with amalgam restorations showed significantly increased (p spleen > cerebrum occipital lobe > cerebellum > liver > thymus, and the tissue silver concentration was significantly (p
PubMed ID
9649170 View in PubMed
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Anti-inflammatory effect and soft properties of etiprednol dicloacetate (BNP-166), a new, anti-asthmatic steroid.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15156
Source
Pharmazie. 2004 May;59(5):412-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
I. Kurucz
K. Németh
S. Mészáros
K. Török
Z. Nagy
Z. Zubovics
K. Horváth
N. Bodor
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunopharmacology, IVAX Drug Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary.
Source
Pharmazie. 2004 May;59(5):412-6
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - pharmacokinetics - pharmacology
Animals
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - pharmacokinetics - pharmacology
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Biotransformation
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Budesonide - pharmacology
Cell Division - drug effects
Cell Line
Chromatography, Liquid
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Granulocytes - drug effects
Humans
Interleukin-1 - biosynthesis
Lectins - pharmacology
Lipopolysaccharides - pharmacology
Male
Monocytes - drug effects - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - metabolism
Abstract
In vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory properties and soft characteristics of etiprednol dicloacetate (BNP-166) a new steroid, which has been developed for the treatment of asthma, were investigated in this study. The compound effectively decreased cytokine production in lipopolysaccharide stimulated lymphocytes and attenuated lectin-induced proliferation of blood mononuclear cells in tissue culture. In an animal model of allergen sensitized and challenged Brown Norway rats, using topical treatment, etiprednol dicloacetate substantially attenuated the extent of allergen induced bronchoalveolar fluid eosinophilia. At every examined parameter its pharmacological effects were comparable to those of budesonide. By means of in vitro biological and analytical methods the soft character of BNP-166 was also investigated. The anti-inflammatory effect of etiprednol dicloacetate in vitro was shown to be the function of the quantity of serum components, present in the assay. This loss of activity was most likely the result of the fast metabolism of etiprednol dicloacetate, which in the presence of sera could have been demonstrated by LC/MS/MS. Our data indicate that the significant local effect of the compound will very likely be accompanied with a drastically reduced systemic activity indicating an encouraging selectivity of the pharmacological action of etiprednol dicloacetate.
PubMed ID
15212312 View in PubMed
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Application of double focusing sector field ICP-MS for multielemental characterization of human hair and nails. Part II. A study of the inhabitants of northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32487
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2000 Oct 30;262(1-2):21-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-2000
Author
I. Rodushkin
M D Axelsson
Author Affiliation
SGAB Analytica, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden. ilia.rodushkin@sgab.se
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2000 Oct 30;262(1-2):21-36
Date
Oct-30-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Elements
Environmental Exposure
Female
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Nails - chemistry
Sex Factors
Smoking
Spectrum Analysis, Mass - methods
Sweden
Trace Elements - analysis
Urban Population
Abstract
Double-focusing sector-field, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was used for the determination of 71 elements in scalp hair and fingernail samples from an urban population group living in the north-east of Sweden. Samples (n = 114 for hair and n = 96 for nails) were taken from subjects without known occupational exposure to metals. From these results, concentration ranges were calculated and compared with published intervals. Statistical analysis was used to elucidate differences according to sex, age and smoking habit. It was found that significant correlations exist between different elements in hair and nails, as well as between hair and nail concentrations for several elements. Strong positive correlation for Hg, Cd, Pb, Sb and Bi levels between these media confirms that both can be used for exposure assessment for these elements. Several examples on the use of distribution patterns for the rare-earth elements (REE) and of Pb isotope ratios for assessment of exposure are given.
PubMed ID
11059839 View in PubMed
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[A stink bomb in an office environment. Sick building syndrome with toxic rhinitis after exposure to fusel]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73400
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Jan 4;155(1):30-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-1993
Author
H O Hein
N E Petri
C P Barfoed
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Arbejdsmedicinsk klinik, Rigshospitalet, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Jan 4;155(1):30-2
Date
Jan-4-1993
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects - analysis
Air pollution, indoor
Chromatography, Gas
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Rhinitis - chemically induced - diagnosis
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Abstract
In 1983 WHO, defined "The Sick Building Syndrome". Various conditions influence the indoor climate, among others the degassing of chemicals. An epidemic of sick building syndrome is described in a two year old office building. The symptoms appeared after exposure to toxic chemicals released by a stink bomb--a form of exposure not previously described in the literature. Gas chromatographic analysis of the content of the stink bomb revealed 22 different chemicals likely to be remains from an alcoholic fermentation process. Twenty-four employees were exposed. A questionnaire investigation of the employees revealed that seven had symptoms related to the exposure. A clinical investigation of those who claimed to have symptoms took place. Six of the seven patients were investigated. They all had toxic rhinitis with bleeding. Owing to an unsystematic procedure it took more than two months before the indoor climate was normalized. The toxic rhinitis and other symptoms gradually decreased over more than four months. In order to minimize potential health damage due to the sick building syndrome, we recommend that experts should be consulted within this particular field.
PubMed ID
8421845 View in PubMed
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Biosynthesis of fusarochromanone and its monoacetyl derivative by Fusarium equiseti.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75635
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1989 Apr;55(4):794-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1989
Author
W P Xie
C J Mirocha
R J Pawlosky
Y C Wen
X G Xu
Author Affiliation
Department of Plant Pathology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul 55108.
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1989 Apr;55(4):794-7
Date
Apr-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acids - biosynthesis - isolation & purification
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Chromatography, Thin Layer
Chromones - biosynthesis - isolation & purification
Culture Media
Fusarium - growth & development - metabolism
Molecular Structure
Mycotoxins - biosynthesis - isolation & purification
Oryza sativa
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Abstract
One fluorescent compound previously named TDP-2 was isolated and purified from a rice culture of Fusarium equiseti (Alaska 2-2). Mass spectral and nuclear magnetic resonance data indicated that it is a C-3'-N-acetyl derivative of fusarochromanone, a newly discovered mycotoxin. Time course studies of synthesis of these two compounds on autoclaved rice and Czapek-Dox medium enriched with soybean peptone indicated that fusarochromanone was converted to TDP-2 in the cultures. A high concentration of peptone in the liquid medium may stimulate both fusarochromanone synthesis and its conversion to TDP-2.
PubMed ID
2729980 View in PubMed
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Carbamazepine and its metabolites in human perfused placenta and in maternal and cord blood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64619
Source
Epilepsia. 1995 Mar;36(3):241-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
P. Pienimäki
A L Hartikainen
P. Arvela
T. Partanen
R. Herva
O. Pelkonen
K. Vähäkangas
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Epilepsia. 1995 Mar;36(3):241-8
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antipyrine - metabolism - pharmacokinetics
Biological Transport
Blood - metabolism
Carbamazepine - analogs & derivatives - blood - metabolism - pharmacokinetics
Chromatography, Gas
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Female
Fetal Blood - metabolism
Humans
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Placenta - metabolism
Pregnancy
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Abstract
Placental transfer and metabolism of carbamazepine (CBZ) was studied in a dual recirculating placental cotyledon perfusion system and was also evaluated in 16 pairs of maternal venous and cord blood samples. Among the parameters studied as possible indicators of a successful perfusion, volume changes in perfusate divided the perfusions into two groups, whereas no significant differences between perfusions were noted in blood gas analysis or in antipyrine transfer. CBZ added into the maternal circulation crosses the placenta in the beginning quicker than antipyrine which is in agreement with the different lipid solubilities of these compounds. Because the transfer rates of antipyrine and CBZ were about the same, the mechanism of transfer of CBZ is probably similar to that of antipyrine (passive diffusion). No metabolites of CBZ could be detected in the perfusate by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. With the improved HPLC methodology for CBZ metabolites, six metabolites were detected in clinical samples, including 10-hydroxy-10,11-dihydro-CBZ (10-OH-CBZ), which has been described earlier in only 1 uremic patient. Relative levels of metabolites showed significant individual differences. CBZ crosses perfused placenta rapidly, but this does not contribute to CBZ metabolites detected in maternal and fetal circulation.
PubMed ID
7614907 View in PubMed
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Circumpolar study of perfluoroalkyl contaminants in polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5521
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2005 Aug 1;39(15):5517-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2005
Author
Marla Smithwick
Scott A Mabury
Keith R Solomon
Christian Sonne
Jonathan W Martin
Erik W Born
Rune Dietz
Andrew E Derocher
Robert J Letcher
Thomas J Evans
Geir W Gabrielsen
John Nagy
Ian Stirling
Mitch K Taylor
Derek C G Muir
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Biology, University of Guelph, Bovey Building, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2005 Aug 1;39(15):5517-23
Date
Aug-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Animals
Arctic Regions
Chromatography, Liquid
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Fluorocarbons - analysis
Liver - chemistry
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Ursidae
Abstract
Perfluoroalkyl substances were determined in liver tissues and blood of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from five locations in the North American Arctic and two locations in the European Arctic. Concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorohexane sulfonate, heptadecafluorooctane sulfonamide, and perfluoroalkyl carboxylates with C(8)-C(15) perfluorinated carbon chains were determined using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. PFOS concentrations were significantly correlated with age at four of seven sampling locations, while gender was not correlated to concentration for any compound measured. Populations in South Hudson Bay (2000-2730 ng/g wet wt), East Greenland (911-2140 ng/g wet wt), and Svalbard (756-1290 ng/g wet wt) had significantly (P
PubMed ID
16124282 View in PubMed
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48 records – page 1 of 5.