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Airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel: trichloramine exposure, exhaled NO and protein profiling of nasal lavage fluids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123142
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jul;86(5):571-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Louise Fornander
Bijar Ghafouri
Mats Lindahl
Pål Graff
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jul;86(5):571-80
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Biological Markers - metabolism
Chlorides - adverse effects - analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional
Female
Humans
Immunoblotting
Male
Middle Aged
Nasal Lavage Fluid - chemistry
Nitric Oxide - metabolism
Nitrogen Compounds - adverse effects - analysis
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Prevalence
Proteome - metabolism
Respiratory Tract Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Risk factors
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Sweden - epidemiology
Swimming Pools
Abstract
Occurrence of airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel was investigated. The aims of this study were to assess trichloramine exposure levels and exhaled nitric oxide in relation to the prevalence of airway symptoms in swimming pool facilities and to determine protein effects in the upper respiratory tract.
The presence of airway symptoms related to work was examined in 146 individuals working at 46 indoor swimming pool facilities. Levels of trichloramine, as well as exhaled nitric oxide, were measured in five facilities with high prevalence of airway irritation and four facilities with no airway irritation among the personnel. Nasal lavage fluid was collected, and protein profiles were determined by a proteomic approach.
17 % of the swimming pool personnel reported airway symptoms related to work. The levels of trichloramine in the swimming pool facilities ranged from 0.04 to 0.36 mg/m(3). There was no covariance between trichloramine levels, exhaled nitric oxide and prevalence of airway symptoms. Protein profiling of the nasal lavage fluid showed that the levels alpha-1-antitrypsin and lactoferrin were significantly higher, and S100-A8 was significantly lower in swimming pool personnel.
This study confirms the occurrence of airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel. Our results indicate altered levels of innate immunity proteins in the upper airways that may pose as potential biomarkers. However, swimming pool facilities with high prevalence of airway irritation could not be explained by higher trichloramine exposure levels. Further studies are needed to clarify the environmental factors in indoor swimming pools that cause airway problems and affect the immune system.
PubMed ID
22729567 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of coral lophelia pertusa mucus as an analytical matrix for environmental monitoring: A preliminary proteomic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283027
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2016;79(13-15):647-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Fiona Provan
Mari Mæland Nilsen
Eivind Larssen
Kai-Erik Uleberg
Magne O Sydnes
Emily Lyng
Kjell Birger Øysæd
Thierry Baussant
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2016;79(13-15):647-57
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anthozoa - chemistry - drug effects
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Mucus - chemistry - drug effects
North Sea
Norway
Petroleum - toxicity
Proteome - drug effects
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization - methods
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
For the environmental monitoring of coral, mucus appears to be an appropriate biological matrix due to its array of functions in coral biology and the non-intrusive manner in which it can be collected. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of using mucus of the stony coral Lophelia pertusa (L. pertusa) as an analytical matrix for discovery of biomarkers used for environmental monitoring. More specifically, to assess whether a mass-spectrometry-based proteomic approach can be applied to characterize the protein composition of coral mucus and changes related to petroleum discharges at the seafloor. Surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS) screening analyses of orange and white L. pertusa showed that the mucosal protein composition varies significantly with color phenotype, a pattern not reported prior to this study. Hence, to reduce variability from phenotype difference, L. pertusa white individuals only were selected to characterize in more detail the basal protein composition in mucus using liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In total, 297 proteins were identified in L. pertusa mucus of unexposed coral individuals. Individuals exposed to drill cuttings in the range 2 to 12 mg/L showed modifications in coral mucus protein composition compared to unexposed corals. Although the results were somewhat inconsistent between individuals and require further validation in both the lab and the field, this study demonstrated preliminary encouraging results for discovery of protein markers in coral mucus that might provide more comprehensive insight into potential consequences attributed to anthropogenic stressors and may be used in future monitoring of coral health.
PubMed ID
27484144 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antimicrobial susceptibility and body site distribution of community isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279589
Source
APMIS. 2016 Nov;124(11):973-978
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Jorunn Pauline Cavanagh
Runa Wolden
Philipp Heise
Eirin Esaiassen
Claus Klingenberg
Elizabeth G Aarag Fredheim
Source
APMIS. 2016 Nov;124(11):973-978
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Carrier State - epidemiology - microbiology
Coagulase - deficiency
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Female
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Skin - microbiology
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Staphylococcus - classification - drug effects - enzymology - isolation & purification
Young Adult
Abstract
The primary aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) from healthy adults in the community. Healthy adults (n = 114) were swabbed on six body sites; both armpits, both knee pits and both sides of the groin. Species determination was performed using Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization - Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) and susceptibility testing for 11 relevant antimicrobials was performed by the disc diffusion method and minimal inhibitory concentration gradient test. In total, 693 CoNS isolates were identified. Susceptibility testing was done on 386 isolates; one CoNS from each species found on each participant from the different body sites. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in the CoNS isolates were; erythromycin (24.6%), fusidic acid (19.9%), tetracycline (11.4%), clindamycin (7.8%), gentamicin (6.2%) and cefoxitin (4.1%). Multidrug resistance was observed in 5.2% of the isolates. Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. hominis were the first and second most prevalent species on all three body sites. We conclude that CoNS isolates from healthy adults in the community have a much lower prevalence of antimicrobial resistance than reported in nosocomial CoNS isolates. Still, we believe that levels of resistance in community CoNS should be monitored as the consumption of antimicrobials in primary care in Norway is increasing.
PubMed ID
27599662 View in PubMed
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Association of the lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase R620W variant with rheumatoid arthritis, but not Crohn's disease, in Canadian populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174114
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2005 Jul;52(7):1993-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Mark van Oene
Richard F Wintle
Xiangdong Liu
Mehrdad Yazdanpanah
Xiangjun Gu
Bill Newman
Albert Kwan
Benjamin Johnson
Julie Owen
Wenda Greer
Dianne Mosher
Walter Maksymowych
Ed Keystone
Laurence A Rubin
Christopher I Amos
Katherine A Siminovitch
Author Affiliation
Ellipsis Biotherapeutics Corporation, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2005 Jul;52(7):1993-8
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - genetics - immunology - pathology
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Crohn Disease - epidemiology - genetics - immunology - pathology
Female
Gene Expression Regulation
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Lymphoid Tissue - enzymology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 1
Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 22
Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases - genetics - metabolism
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Abstract
A single-nucleotide polymorphism in the PTPN22 gene encoding the lymphoid protein tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp) has recently been identified as a functional variant associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA), type 1 diabetes, and systemic lupus erythematosus. To determine whether association of this variant (PTPN22 1858T) with RA is reproducible and is also observed in another autoimmune condition, Crohn's disease, we investigated the association between the PTPN22 1858T allele and RA and Crohn's disease in a Canadian population.
Two RA case-control cohorts representing a total of 1,234 patients and 791 healthy controls as well as a cohort of 455 patients with Crohn's disease and 190 controls were genotyped for the PTPN22 C1858T polymorphism, and genotype frequencies were compared between patients and controls.
Significant association of the PTPN22 1858T allele with RA was detected in both the Toronto-based RA cohort (P = 1.6 x 10(-6), odds ratio [OR] 1.8) and the Halifax-based RA cohort (P = 9.4 x 10(-4), OR 1.94). Association of the risk allele with RA was not affected by sex, age at disease onset, or the presence of either rheumatoid factor or rheumatoid nodules. No association between the PTPN22 risk allele and Crohn's disease was detected.
These observations confirm the association of RA susceptibility with the PTPN22 1858T allele. However, the data also reveal a lack of association between this variant and Crohn's disease, suggesting that the PTPN22 1858T allele is a risk allele for multiple, but not all, autoimmune diseases.
Notes
Comment In: Arthritis Rheum. 2005 Jul;52(7):1952-515986339
PubMed ID
15986374 View in PubMed
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[CARD15 and TLR4 genes polymorphisms in atopic bronchial asthma].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126406
Source
Mol Biol (Mosk). 2011 Sep-Oct;45(5):831-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
O E Voron'ko
E V Dmitrieva-Zdorova
E A Latysheva
M G Aksenova
G I Storozhakov
N V Bodoev
A I Archakov
Source
Mol Biol (Mosk). 2011 Sep-Oct;45(5):831-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Asthma - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Haplotypes
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow
Nod2 Signaling Adaptor Protein - genetics
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Severity of Illness Index
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Toll-Like Receptor 4 - genetics
Abstract
In order to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms G(+2722)C and 3020insC in CARD15 gene and Asp299Gly in TLR4 gene contribute to atopic bronchial asthma we performed a comparative analysis of alleles and genotypes frequencies of these polymorphisms in Russian patients from Moscow. DNA samples from 283 patients with atopic bronchial asthma and 227 healthy donors were genotyped. There were associations neither of G(+2722)C and 3020insC in CARD15 gene and Asp299Gly in TLR4 gene with asthma nor of markers of CARD15 gene with asthma severity. Haplotype frequency analysis of CARD15 gene polymorphisms did not reveal significant difference between groups. However, a strong association was found between Asp299Gly and asthma severity. Allele Asp of this marker showed association with mild atopic bronchial asthma and allele Gl--with moderate/severe asthma = 0.47, 95% CI [0.24-0.93] i OR = 2.12, 95% CI [1.08-4.18] respectively).
PubMed ID
22393779 View in PubMed
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Characterization of condensed tannins and carbohydrates in hot water bark extracts of European softwood species.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275205
Source
Phytochemistry. 2015 Dec;120:53-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Sauro Bianchi
Ivana Kroslakova
Ron Janzon
Ingo Mayer
Bodo Saake
Frédéric Pichelin
Source
Phytochemistry. 2015 Dec;120:53-61
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biflavonoids
Catechin
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Flavonoids
Glucosides - chemistry
Hot Temperature
Molecular Structure
Norway
Picea - chemistry
Pinus
Plant Bark - chemistry
Plant Extracts - chemistry
Proanthocyanidins
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Tannins - chemistry - isolation & purification
Water - metabolism
Abstract
Condensed tannins extracted from European softwood bark are recognized as alternatives to synthetic phenolics. The extraction is generally performed in hot water, leading to simultaneous extraction of other bark constituents such as carbohydrates, phenolic monomers and salts. Characterization of the extract's composition and identification of the extracted tannins' molecular structure are needed to better identify potential applications. Bark from Silver fir (Abies alba [Mill.]), European larch (Larix decidua [Mill.]), Norway spruce (Picea abies [Karst.]), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.]) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris [L.]) were extracted in water at 60°C. The amounts of phenolic monomers, condensed tannins, carbohydrates, and inorganic compounds in the extract were determined. The molecular structures of condensed tannins and carbohydrates were also investigated (HPLC-UV combined with thiolysis, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, anion exchange chromatography). Distinct extract compositions and tannin structures were found in each of the analysed species. Procyanidins were the most ubiquitous tannins. The presence of phenolic glucosides in the tannin oligomers was suggested. Polysaccharides such as arabinans, arabinogalactans and glucans represented an important fraction of all extracts. Compared to traditionally used species (Mimosa and Quebracho) higher viscosities as well as faster chemical reactivities are expected in the analysed species. The most promising species for a bark tannin extraction was found to be larch, while the least encouraging results were detected in pine. A better knowledge of the interaction between the various extracted compounds is deemed an important matter for investigation in the context of industrial applications of such extracts.
PubMed ID
26547588 View in PubMed
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Characterization of the human small-ribosomal-subunit proteins by N-terminal and internal sequencing, and mass spectrometry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64465
Source
Eur J Biochem. 1996 Jul 1;239(1):144-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1996
Author
S N Vladimirov
A V Ivanov
G G Karpova
A K Musolyamov
T A Egorov
B. Thiede
B. Wittmann-Liebold
A. Otto
Author Affiliation
Novosibirsk Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Federation.
Source
Eur J Biochem. 1996 Jul 1;239(1):144-9
Date
Jul-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional
Female
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Molecular Weight
Placenta - chemistry
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ribosomal Proteins - chemistry
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Abstract
Reverse-phase HPLC was used to fractionate 40S ribosomal proteins from human placenta. Application of a C4 reverse-phase column allowed us to obtain 27 well-resolved peaks. The protein composition of each chromatographic fraction was established by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and N-terminal sequencing. N-terminally blocked proteins were cleaved with endoproteinase Lys-C, and suitable peptides were sequenced. All sequences were compared with those of ribosomal proteins available from data bases. This allowed us to identify all proteins from the 40S human ribosomal subunit in the HPLC elution profile. By matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometry the masses of the 40S proteins were determined and checked for the presence of post-translational modifications. For several proteins differences to the deduced sequences and the calculated masses were found to be due to post-translational modifications.
PubMed ID
8706699 View in PubMed
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Chemical Structure of the Lipid A component of Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 28618 from Thawing Permafrost in Relation to Pathogenicity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296930
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 05 19; 7(1):2168
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-19-2017
Author
Han-Gyu Park
Ganesan Sathiyanarayanan
Cheol-Hwan Hwang
Da-Hee Ann
Jung-Ho Kim
Geul Bang
Kyoung-Soon Jang
Hee Wook Ryu
Yoo Kyung Lee
Yung-Hun Yang
Yun-Gon Kim
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemical Engineering, Soongsil University, Seoul, 06978, Korea.
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 05 19; 7(1):2168
Date
05-19-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Lipid A - chemistry
Molecular Structure
Permafrost - microbiology
Phenotype
Phylogeny
Plant Diseases
Pseudomonas - classification - pathogenicity - physiology
Soil Microbiology
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Structure-Activity Relationship
Abstract
Climate change causes permafrost thawing, and we are confronted with the unpredictable risk of newly discovered permafrost microbes that have disease-causing capabilities. Here, we first characterized the detailed chemical structure of the lipid A moiety from a Pseudomonas species that was isolated from thawing arctic permafrost using MALDI-based mass spectrometric approaches (i.e., MALDI-TOF MS and MALDI-QIT-TOF MSn). The MALDI multi-stage mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of lipid A extracted from the Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 28618 demonstrated that the hexaacyl lipid A ([M-H]- at m/z 1616.5) contains a glucosamine (GlcN) disaccharide backbone, two phosphates, four main acyl chains and two branched acyl chains. Moreover, the lipid A molecule-based structural activity relationship with other terrestrial Gram-negative bacteria indicated that strain PAMC 28618 has an identical lipid A structure with the mesophilic Pseudomonas cichorii which can cause rot disease in endive (Cichorium endivia) and that their bacterial toxicities were equivalent. Therefore, the overall lipid A validation process provides a general strategy for characterizing bacteria that have been isolated from arctic permafrost and analyzing their respective pathogenicities.
PubMed ID
28526845 View in PubMed
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Clinical and microbiological features of Actinotignum bacteremia: a retrospective observational study of 57 cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282062
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2017 May;36(5):791-796
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
H. Pedersen
E. Senneby
M. Rasmussen
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2017 May;36(5):791-796
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinomycetaceae - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Actinomycetales Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - pathology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacteremia - epidemiology - microbiology - pathology
Blood - microbiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence, clinical presentation, and prognosis of Actinotignum bacteremia in southern Sweden. Actinotignum isolates in blood cultures were identified retrospectively between 1st January 2012 and 31st March 2016 through searches in the clinical microbiology laboratory database. The population covered by this laboratory is approximately 1.3 million. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used for species determination. Etests were used for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination. The patients' medical charts were reviewed. Fifty-eight episodes in fifty-seven patients with Actinotignum bacteremia were identified (A. schaalii?=?53, A. sanguinis?=?1, A. urinale?=?2, and Actinotignum species?=?3), which corresponds to an incidence of 11 cases per million inhabitants. Fifty-one percent of the isolates were in pure culture. The MICs were low for ß-lactam antibiotics, whereas high MICs were recorded for ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim. Patients had a median age of 82 years, 72% were male, and a majority had underlying urological conditions. Thirty-six of the patients were diagnosed with a focus from the urinary tract. Thirty-one patients developed severe sepsis and nine patients died during the hospital stay. Our study is the largest of Actinotignum bacteremia and demonstrates that it is a condition with a significant fatality that affects elderly persons with underlying conditions. ß-Lactams represent a rational treatment option.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27957598 View in PubMed
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Clinical and microbiological features of infective endocarditis caused by aerococci.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278645
Source
Infection. 2016 Apr;44(2):167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Torgny Sunnerhagen
Bo Nilson
Lars Olaison
Magnus Rasmussen
Source
Infection. 2016 Apr;44(2):167-73
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerococcus - chemistry - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Disk Diffusion Antimicrobial Tests
Drug Synergism
Endocarditis - microbiology - pathology
Female
Gentamicins - pharmacology
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - microbiology - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Penicillins - pharmacology
Prognosis
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Sweden
Abstract
To define the clinical presentation of aerococcal infective endocarditis (IE) and the prevalence of synergy between penicillin and gentamicin on aerococcal isolates.
Cases of aerococcal IE between 2002 and 2014 were identified in the Swedish Registry of Infective Endocarditis (SRIE). MALDI-TOF MS was used to confirm species determination. The medical records were analysed and compared to cases reported to the SRIE caused by other pathogens.
Sixteen cases of aerococcal IE, fourteen with Aerococcus urinae and two with Aerococcus sanguinicola, were confirmed. Etest-based methods and time-kill experiments suggested synergy between penicillin and gentamicin towards seven of fifteen isolates. The patients with aerococcal IE were significantly older than those with streptococci or Staphylococcus aureus IE. Most of the patients had underlying urinary tract diseases or symptoms suggesting a urinary tract focus of the infection. Seven patients with aerococcal IE presented with severe sepsis but ICU treatment was needed only in one patient and there was no fatality. Valve exchange surgery was needed in four patients and embolization was seen in three patients.
This report is the largest on aerococcal IE and suggests that the prognosis is relatively favourable despite the fact that the patients are old and have significant comorbidities.
PubMed ID
26119199 View in PubMed
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48 records – page 1 of 5.