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Adrenal vein sampling: substantial need for technical improvement at regional referral centres.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114579
Source
Clin Biochem. 2013 Oct;46(15):1399-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Panda Elliott
Daniel T Holmes
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Arts and Science, Queen's University, Kingston ON, Canada.
Source
Clin Biochem. 2013 Oct;46(15):1399-404
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - blood - diagnosis - pathology
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - blood - diagnosis - pathology
Adrenal Glands - blood supply - metabolism - pathology
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone - administration & dosage
Adult
Aged
Aldosterone - blood
Canada
Catheterization - methods
Female
Humans
Hydrocortisone - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Referral and Consultation
Renin - blood
Retrospective Studies
Specimen Handling - standards
Abstract
Adrenal vein sampling (AVS) is the gold standard for localization of aldosterone producing adenoma. The anatomy of the right adrenal vein makes this procedure technically demanding and it may yield no clinical information if the adrenal veins are not adequately cannulated. Having frequently observed the technical failure of AVS, we undertook a review of 220 procedures in British Columbia, Canada.
Subjects were retrospectively identified through the laboratory information system. The following were collected: demographics, screening aldosterone concentration and renin activity/mass, results of dynamic function tests, AVS aldosterone and cortisol results. Standard calculations were performed on AVS data and site-specific success rates were compared. The effect of adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) stimulation on the selectivity index (SI) and lateralization index (LI) were explored.
The overall technical success-rate of AVS procedures was only 44% in procedures where no ACTH-stimulation was used (n=200) but this rose significantly (p
PubMed ID
23603377 View in PubMed
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Alaska native people's perceptions, understandings, and expectations for research involving biological specimens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123802
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18642
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Vanessa Y Hiratsuka
Jennifer K Brown
Theresa J Hoeft
Denise A Dillard
Author Affiliation
Southcentral Foundation, Research Department, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. vhiratsuka@scf.cc
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18642
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Ethics, Research
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Informed consent
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups - psychology
Research
Specimen Handling - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Members of racially and ethnically diverse groups have been persistently underrepresented in biomedical research in general, possibly due to mistrust with the medical and research community. This article describes the perceptions, understandings, and expectations of Alaska Native people about research involving the collection and storage of biological specimens.
Stratified focus groups.
Twenty-nine focus groups with Alaska Native people (n = 178) were held in 14 locations using a semi-structured moderator guide. ATLAS.ti was used for thematic analysis through iterative readings and coding. Alaska Native peoples' perceptions, understandings, and expectations of researcher beneficence, informed consent processes, and provision of research findings were elicited.
Alaska Native people desired extensive disclosure of information beyond that typically provided in consent and results dissemination processes. Information germane to the motivation and intent of researchers and specifics of specimen storage and destruction were specifically requested. A clear and extensive process of informed consent and continued improvements in sharing results may enhance the transparency of research intent, conduct, and use of obtained results among Alaska Native people. Meeting expectations may improve relationships between researchers and the Alaska Native population which could result in increased research participation. Our findings offer a guide for researchers and communities when planning and implementing research with biological specimens.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22663942 View in PubMed
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Analysis of clothing and urine from Moscow theatre siege casualties reveals carfentanil and remifentanil use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120444
Source
J Anal Toxicol. 2012 Nov-Dec;36(9):647-56
Publication Type
Article
Author
James R Riches
Robert W Read
Robin M Black
Nicholas J Cooper
Christopher M Timperley
Author Affiliation
Detection Department, Defence Science and Technology Laboratory-Dstl, Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 0JQ, UK.
Source
J Anal Toxicol. 2012 Nov-Dec;36(9):647-56
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols - adverse effects
Chromatography, Liquid
Clothing
Female
Fentanyl - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - blood - urine
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow
Piperidines - adverse effects - blood - urine
Riot Control Agents, Chemical - adverse effects - blood - urine
Solid Phase Extraction
Specimen Handling
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Terrorism - prevention & control
Abstract
On October 26, 2002, Russian Special Forces deployed a chemical aerosol against Chechen terrorists to rescue hostages in the Dubrovka theatre. Its use confirmed Russian military interest in chemicals with effects on personnel and caused 125 deaths through a combination of the aerosol and inadequate medical care. This study provides evidence from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of extracts of clothing from two British survivors, and urine from a third survivor, that the aerosol comprised a mixture of two anaesthetics--carfentanil and remifentanil--whose relative proportions this study was unable to identify. Carfentanil and remifentanil were found on a shirt sample and a metabolite called norcarfentanil was found in a urine sample. This metabolite probably originated from carfentanil.
PubMed ID
23002178 View in PubMed
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Source
J Hum Evol. 2003 Mar;44(3):389-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Igor V Ovchinnikov
William Goodwin
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Prebyterian Medical Center, Vanderbilt Clinic 15-202, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. io44@columbia.edu
Source
J Hum Evol. 2003 Mar;44(3):389-92
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Physical - methods
Complementarity Determining Regions
DNA, Mitochondrial - isolation & purification
Female
Fossils
Humans
Male
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Reproducibility of Results
Russia
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Specimen Handling
PubMed ID
12674098 View in PubMed
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Archival bone marrow samples: suitable for multiple biomarker analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265165
Source
Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol. 2015 Jan;23(1):71-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Bendik Lund
Laeya A Najmi
Agata Wesolowska-Andersen
Veslemøy M Landsem
Kirsten K Rasmussen
Louise Borst
Ramneek Gupta
Kjeld Schmiegelow
Helge Klungland
Source
Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol. 2015 Jan;23(1):71-7
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Biopsy
Bone Banks - standards
Bone Marrow - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA - analysis - isolation & purification
Denmark
Female
Fluorometry
Genome - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Male
Microsatellite Repeats - genetics
Norway
Pilot Projects
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - diagnosis - genetics
Specimen Handling
Spectrophotometry
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis
Abstract
AB Archival samples represent a significant potential for genetic studies, particularly in severe diseases with risk of lethal outcome, such as in cancer. In this pilot study, we aimed to evaluate the usability of archival bone marrow smears and biopsies for DNA extraction and purification, whole genome amplification (WGA), multiple marker analysis including 10 short tandem repeats, and finally a comprehensive genotyping of 33,683 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with multiplexed targeted next-generation sequencing. A total of 73 samples from 21 bone marrow smears and 13 bone marrow biopsies from 18 Danish and Norwegian childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients were included and compared with corresponding blood samples. Samples were grouped according to the age of sample and whether WGA was performed or not. We found that measurements of DNA concentration after DNA extraction was dependent on detection method and that spectrophotometry overestimated DNA amount compared with fluorometry. In the short tandem repeat analysis, detection rate dropped slightly with longer fragments. After WGA, this drop was more pronounced. Samples stored for 0 to 3 years showed better results compared with samples stored for 4 to 10 years. Acceptable call rates for SNPs were detected for 7 of 42 archival samples. In conclusion, archival bone marrow samples are suitable for DNA extraction and multiple marker analysis, but WGA was less successful, especially when longer fragments were analyzed. Multiple SNP analysis seems feasible, but the method has to be further optimized.
PubMed ID
25621358 View in PubMed
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Assessing human polychlorinated biphenyl contamination for epidemiologic studies: lessons from patterns of congener concentrations in Canadians in 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185987
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Apr;111(4):437-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Beth C Gladen
Josée Doucet
Larry G Hansen
Author Affiliation
Biostatistics Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA. gladen@niehs.nih.gov
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Apr;111(4):437-43
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Epidemiologic Studies
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Milk, human - chemistry
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Reproducibility of Results
Specimen Handling
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Humans are always exposed to mixtures of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), so assessment of their health effects is complicated. Because the original sources are relatively standard mixtures that change in predictable ways while traversing the environment, there is substantial uniformity in the congener mixtures people carry. To the extent that concentrations are highly correlated, measuring multiple congeners within correlated groups would be unnecessary and estimation of separate biologic effects would be impossible. We examined correlation patterns in previously collected data on 38 congeners (and 14 other organochlorines) from 497 human milk samples from Canada from 1992. Congeners 138, 153, 156, 157, 170, 183, 187, 194, 199, and 203 were highly intercorrelated; 180 had slightly lower correlations with this group. Congeners 74, 105, and 118 were highly intercorrelated and moderately to highly correlated with the first group. Congener 99 had moderate correlations with both these groups, and congener 66 had lesser correlations with the primary group. In contrast, congeners 28, 44, 49, 60, 90/101, 128, 137, and 193 showed little correlation with any other congeners. The remaining 14 congeners were uninformative; they were quantified in fewer than 30% of samples, and varying lipid concentrations meant that those quantified were not necessarily at higher concentrations than those not quantified. In study of human health effects of PCBs, the congener pattern present in the population under study should be examined when deciding which congeners to measure; instead of solely redundant or uninformative congeners, attention should be given to other congeners that may be more useful in addressing the question of interest.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12676596 View in PubMed
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Attitudes towards biomedical use of tissue sample collections, consent, and biobanks among Finns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147443
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Feb;38(1):46-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Aaro Tupasela
Sinikka Sihvo
Karolna Snell
Pa Jallinoja
Arja R Aro
Elina Hemminki
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. aaro.tupasela@helsinki.fi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Feb;38(1):46-52
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Specimen Banks
Female
Finland
Genetic Research
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Informed consent
Male
Middle Aged
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Specimen Handling
Tissue Banks
Abstract
To ascertain the attitudes towards the use of existing diagnostic and research samples, the setting up of a national biobank, and different types of informed consent among Finns.
A population survey of 2,400 randomly selected Finns aged 24-65 was conducted at the beginning of 2007.
A total of 1,195 responses (50%) were received after one reminder. Of the respondents, 83% said that they had little or no knowledge of what biobanks were. Despite this, 77% regarded the setting up of a national biobank in a positive light. One third (34%) would not attach any conditions on their consent, while 42% said that it was important to regain consent when the new study contains diverging steps. One third (30%) wanted consent to be regained for every new research project, and 44% would like to decide what type of research their samples would be used for if they were included in a national biobank. One third of both men and women approved of the use of their samples in research involving private enterprises.
In general, Finns were positive toward the setting up of a national biobank, as well as public-private partnerships, even though they considered their knowledge of biobanking to be limited. This, however, did not mean that they were indifferent to the use of their samples, but most wanted the ability to control how their samples are used.
PubMed ID
19906772 View in PubMed
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Bacterial findings in optimised sampling and characterisation of S. aureus in chronic rhinosinusitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280972
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2017 Jan;274(1):311-319
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Ulrica Thunberg
Bo Söderquist
Svante Hugosson
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2017 Jan;274(1):311-319
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Chronic Disease
Female
Humans
Male
Maxillary Sinus - microbiology
Middle Aged
Nasal Cavity - microbiology
Rhinitis - microbiology - physiopathology
Sinusitis - microbiology - physiopathology
Specimen Handling - methods
Staphylococcal Infections - microbiology - physiopathology
Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Sweden
Abstract
The bacterial spectrum in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is clinically relevant. This study aimed to compare two sampling techniques and to characterise Staphylococcus aureus isolated from CRS patients. Bacterial specimens were collected from the nares and maxillary sinus in 42 CRS patients and from the nares in 57 healthy controls. Maxillary sinus sampling was performed in two ways in each patient: with a cotton-tipped aluminium swab through the enlarged sinus ostium, and with a protected brush. S. aureus was characterised by DNA-sequencing of the repeat region of the S. aureus protein A gene, spa typing. The protected brush technique was superior to the cotton-tipped aluminium swab in reducing contamination rate. However, the two sampling methods were consistent in terms of clinically relevant bacterial findings, and the easy-to-handle cotton-tipped swab can still be recommended when culturing the maxillary sinus. Patients showed a significantly higher presence of S. aureus in the nares compared with healthy controls, and healthy controls showed a significantly higher presence of coagulase-negative staphylococci in the nares compared with patients. The spa types were identical for the nares and maxillary sinus in all patients except one. The sampling techniques showed equivalent results, indicating a low risk of unnecessary antibiotic treatment when using the easy-to-handle cotton-tipped aluminium swab. The high rate of identical spa types of S. aureus isolated from the nares and maxillary sinus of CRS patients might indicate colonisation of the maxillary sinus from the nares.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27538736 View in PubMed
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Basic urinalysis and urine culture: Finnish recommendations from the working group on clean midstream specimens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103332
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest Suppl. 1990;200:26-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
T. Koivula
P. Grönroos
J. Gävert
A. Icen
K. Irjala
I. Penttilä
A. Siitonen
O A Siukola
Author Affiliation
Central Laboratory, Tampere University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest Suppl. 1990;200:26-33
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Specimen Handling
Urine - analysis - cytology - microbiology
Urologic Diseases - diagnosis
Abstract
A recommendation for basic urinalysis and urine culture is published as an attempt to improve the clinical value of urinary tests and to create a system that utilizes laboratory work as sensibly as possible. More clinical background information is needed when basic urinalysis and urine culture is performed in stages. Collection and storage of urine specimens are standardized in addition to used equipment and bacterial culture. Cytological supravital stain improves qualitative and quantitative findings of urine sediment cytology. A close cooperation between central hospital district is necessary and stressed for further bacterial cultures in more complicated microbiological findings.
PubMed ID
2399434 View in PubMed
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125 records – page 1 of 13.