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Adrenal vein sampling: substantial need for technical improvement at regional referral centres.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114579
Source
Clin Biochem. 2013 Oct;46(15):1399-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Panda Elliott
Daniel T Holmes
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Arts and Science, Queen's University, Kingston ON, Canada.
Source
Clin Biochem. 2013 Oct;46(15):1399-404
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - blood - diagnosis - pathology
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - blood - diagnosis - pathology
Adrenal Glands - blood supply - metabolism - pathology
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone - administration & dosage
Adult
Aged
Aldosterone - blood
Canada
Catheterization - methods
Female
Humans
Hydrocortisone - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Referral and Consultation
Renin - blood
Retrospective Studies
Specimen Handling - standards
Abstract
Adrenal vein sampling (AVS) is the gold standard for localization of aldosterone producing adenoma. The anatomy of the right adrenal vein makes this procedure technically demanding and it may yield no clinical information if the adrenal veins are not adequately cannulated. Having frequently observed the technical failure of AVS, we undertook a review of 220 procedures in British Columbia, Canada.
Subjects were retrospectively identified through the laboratory information system. The following were collected: demographics, screening aldosterone concentration and renin activity/mass, results of dynamic function tests, AVS aldosterone and cortisol results. Standard calculations were performed on AVS data and site-specific success rates were compared. The effect of adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) stimulation on the selectivity index (SI) and lateralization index (LI) were explored.
The overall technical success-rate of AVS procedures was only 44% in procedures where no ACTH-stimulation was used (n=200) but this rose significantly (p
PubMed ID
23603377 View in PubMed
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[Adulteration of urine drug testing--an exaggerated cause of concern]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10489
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Feb 16;97(7):703-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2000
Author
O. Beck
M. Bohlin
F. Bragd
J. Bragd
O. Greitz
Author Affiliation
Klinisk farmakologi, Karolinska laboratoriet, Karolinska sjukhuset. olof.beck@mb.ks.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Feb 16;97(7):703-6
Date
Feb-16-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Creatinine - urine
English Abstract
Humans
Phencyclidine - analysis - diagnostic use
Reagent Strips - standards
Specimen Handling
Substance Abuse Detection - methods - standards
Sweden
Urinalysis - methods - standards
Abstract
In a study performed at a Stockholm clinic for young people with drug abuse problems, where urine adulteration was suspected to be fairly frequent, a total of 594 patient specimens were subjected to Adultacheck test strip screening for nitrite, glutaraldehyde, pH, and creatinine. Creatinine measurement was also performed at the laboratory, together with drug screening using EMIT reagents, and a subsample was spiked with phencyclidine to verify EMIT test function. The frequency of dilute urine (creatinine
PubMed ID
10740378 View in PubMed
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AIDS and health care in the laboratory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238083
Source
Can J Med Technol. 1985 Dec;47(4):267-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1985

AIDS and the small city: the cost at Kingston General Hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232461
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Sep 15;139(6):557-9, 561-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1988
Author
P. Ford
D. Robertson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Sep 15;139(6):557-9, 561-2
Date
Sep-15-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - economics - nursing
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Equipment and Supplies, Hospital - economics - standards
Hospitalization - economics
Hospitals, General - economics
Humans
Laboratories, Hospital - standards
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - organization & administration
Personnel, Hospital - education
Specimen Handling - standards
Abstract
Although AIDS is often thought of as a "big-city" disease, it is also becoming a serious health care issue for doctors and other health care workers in "small-city" Canada. Kingston, Ont., is one of those small cities, and of the facilities trying to come to grips with a disease about which much remains to be learned. In this article, Drs. Peter Ford and David Robertson outline their hospital's estimate of the cost, in manpower and money, of dealing with the AIDS crisis. The final estimate: roughly $700,000. Although most of the cost will involve one-time capital spending, they point out that there will likely be ongoing labour-related costs because of the special programs and increased manpower needed to deal with AIDS patients. Clearly, AIDS is no longer a big-city disease.
PubMed ID
3409146 View in PubMed
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AIDS: a primary concern for the pathologist.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238082
Source
Can J Med Technol. 1985 Dec;47(4):269-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1985

Airborne molds and actinomycetes in the work environment of farmer's lung patients in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240676
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1984 Apr;10(2):115-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1984
Author
M H Kotimaa
K H Husman
E O Terho
M H Mustonen
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1984 Apr;10(2):115-9
Date
Apr-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Aspergillus - isolation & purification
Environmental Exposure
Farmer's Lung - etiology - microbiology
Finland
Humans
Microbiological Techniques - instrumentation
Micromonosporaceae - isolation & purification
Specimen Handling - instrumentation
Spores, Fungal - isolation & purification
Temperature
Abstract
Occurrence of molds and actinomycetes in the breathing zone of farmers during the handling of hay, straw, or grain was studied with the use of an Andersen sampler on 35 farms in Finland. On 24 farms there was a person with recently diagnosed farmer's lung disease, and on 11 farms people were free of the disease. The total spore concentration and the concentrations of the spores of Thermoactinomyces (T) vulgaris, Micropolyspora (M) faeni, and Aspergillus (A) umbrosus were statistically significantly higher on the farms of patients with farmer's lung than on the disease-free farms. The mean proportions of the spores of thermotolerant and thermophilic microbes were greater on the farms of farmer's lung patients than on the reference farms. T vulgaris was the predominant actinomycete species. Both T vulgaris and A umbrosus were found on all farms of farmer's lung patients, but M faeni on only about half of such farms. The findings match the results of previous microbiological analyses of Finnish moldy hay and serological analyses of Finnish farmer's lung patients. It seems that T vulgaris, not M faeni, may be the main causative agent of farmer's lung in Finland. The possible etiologic role of A umbrosus requires further investigation. Because the farmers often failed to identify the moldiness of the plant material in contrast to researchers, it might be possible, through training, to improve farmers' ability to identify moldiness.
PubMed ID
6382592 View in PubMed
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Aircraft loading and freezer enhancements: lessons for medical research in remote communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156317
Source
Air Med J. 2008 Jul-Aug;27(4):188-92
Publication Type
Article
Author
Roy Gagnon
Faith Gagnon
Constadina Panagiotopoulos
Author Affiliation
Endocrinology & Diabetes Unit, BC Children's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Air Med J. 2008 Jul-Aug;27(4):188-92
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Canada
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis
Endocrinology
Freezing
Glucose Intolerance - diagnosis
Health Services Research
Humans
Meteorological Concepts
Rural Health Services
Specimen Handling - instrumentation
Travel
Abstract
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), historically extremely rare in children, is becoming prevalent among First Nations children. In Canada, many of these children live in remote villages accessible only by float plane. Because T2D has many long-term health implications, prevention and early identification are critical.
We developed a process for sending a fully equipped endocrinology team to a remote community to screen the children for T2D and IGT. Float plane (sea plane) travel has several unexpected limitations for a medical research team. These include having to travel in good visibility (visual flight rules), limited payload capacity, and restriction against transporting dry ice. The benefits include avoiding the usual security restrictions.
We developed and tested a custom-built insulation jacket and system of backup battery packs for the countertop -25 degrees C freezer (in lieu of dry ice) to transport frozen blood samples from the village to our hospital's laboratory. We also ensured that the five-member research team, its equipment, and the consumable supplies stayed within the maximum takeoff weight of the airplane and met center-of-gravity criteria to ensure a safe flight.
Using the insulated freezer, sample integrity was maintained throughout the flight, and a safe weight-and-balance trip was achieved for the team and supplies. The team obtained complete T2D screening data on 88% of children in the remote community.
PubMed ID
18603216 View in PubMed
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Alaska native people's perceptions, understandings, and expectations for research involving biological specimens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123802
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18642
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Vanessa Y Hiratsuka
Jennifer K Brown
Theresa J Hoeft
Denise A Dillard
Author Affiliation
Southcentral Foundation, Research Department, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. vhiratsuka@scf.cc
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18642
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Ethics, Research
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Informed consent
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups - psychology
Research
Specimen Handling - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Members of racially and ethnically diverse groups have been persistently underrepresented in biomedical research in general, possibly due to mistrust with the medical and research community. This article describes the perceptions, understandings, and expectations of Alaska Native people about research involving the collection and storage of biological specimens.
Stratified focus groups.
Twenty-nine focus groups with Alaska Native people (n = 178) were held in 14 locations using a semi-structured moderator guide. ATLAS.ti was used for thematic analysis through iterative readings and coding. Alaska Native peoples' perceptions, understandings, and expectations of researcher beneficence, informed consent processes, and provision of research findings were elicited.
Alaska Native people desired extensive disclosure of information beyond that typically provided in consent and results dissemination processes. Information germane to the motivation and intent of researchers and specifics of specimen storage and destruction were specifically requested. A clear and extensive process of informed consent and continued improvements in sharing results may enhance the transparency of research intent, conduct, and use of obtained results among Alaska Native people. Meeting expectations may improve relationships between researchers and the Alaska Native population which could result in increased research participation. Our findings offer a guide for researchers and communities when planning and implementing research with biological specimens.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22663942 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 25;161(4):414-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-25-1999
Author
H. Mosbech
Author Affiliation
Lunge- og allergiklinikken, Frederiksberg Hospital.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 25;161(4):414-8
Date
Jan-25-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects - analysis - immunology
Animals
Bedding and Linens
Child
Denmark
Dust - adverse effects - analysis
English Abstract
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mites
Specimen Handling - instrumentation
Abstract
House dust mites are the most important indoor allergens in our region. During recent years more dwellings have become infested, most likely as a result of increased indoor humidity due to reduced ventilation. Among Danish adults, 14% have developed IgE against mites. The allergens are stable and can remain for years. Keeping the humidity low ( 55 degrees C mites are killed and allergens removed. In addition mattress covers seem to be useful, although guidelines for quality assessment are lacking. Reduction in mite exposure will reduce development of allergy in all age groups especially in the newborn period. Immunotherapy can be offered in rhinitis and moderate asthma when sufficient allergen reduction cannot be accomplished.
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Apr 20;160(17):2550-19599539
PubMed ID
9951355 View in PubMed
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[A method for transporting blood samples for the determination of antibodies to HIV infection]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8095
Source
Lik Sprava. 1993 Apr;(4):102-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
F I Bogomolov
V S Tomashuk
V M Sheleva
Source
Lik Sprava. 1993 Apr;(4):102-3
Date
Apr-1993
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
HIV Antibodies - blood
Humans
Polystyrenes
Specimen Handling - instrumentation - methods
Ukraine
Abstract
More than 80,000 blood samples are annually transported to the Lutsk diagnostic center for assessment of antibodies to HIV. A polystyrol container for 50 vials is used for transportation of the blood samples for these purpose. The advantages of this way of transportation are discussed.
PubMed ID
8209428 View in PubMed
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242 records – page 1 of 25.