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28 records – page 1 of 3.

Age-dependent occurrence of the intestinal ciliate Balantidium coli in pigs at a Danish research farm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63919
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2000;41(1):79-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
O. Hindsbo
C V Nielsen
J. Andreassen
A L Willingham
M. Bendixen
M A Nielsen
N O Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Ecology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. ohindsbo@zi.ku.dk
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2000;41(1):79-83
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Animals, Suckling
Balantidiasis - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Balantidium - isolation & purification
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Feces - parasitology
Female
Lactation
Parasite Egg Count - veterinary
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Parasitic - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Prevalence
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Statistics, nonparametric
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Abstract
A cross sectional study of the prevalence and intensity of Balantidium coli in pigs was carried out on a Danish research farm. The prevalence of B. coli infection increased from 57% in suckling piglets to 100% in most pig groups > or = 4 weeks old. The mean number of cysts per gram faeces (CPG) of pigs aged 12 weeks and younger were 52 weeks had significantly higher counts of > or = 865 CPG. Although some lactating sows had very high CPG's, no significant differences in CPG could be detected between the intensities of pregnant sows, lactating sows and empty and dry sows. No human cases of B. coli infection have been published in Denmark though it is zoonotic.
PubMed ID
10920478 View in PubMed
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Airway responses in Brown Norway rats following inhalation sensitization and challenge with trimellitic anhydride.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80614
Source
Toxicol Sci. 2006 Dec;94(2):322-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Zhang Xing-Dong
Andrew Michael E
Hubbs Ann F
Siegel Paul D
Author Affiliation
Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia 26505, USA.
Source
Toxicol Sci. 2006 Dec;94(2):322-9
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Airway Resistance - drug effects - physiology
Allergens - immunology - toxicity
Animals
Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic - blood
Bronchi - drug effects - pathology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - chemically induced - immunology - pathology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Female
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Inhalation Exposure
Phthalic Anhydrides - immunology - toxicity
Plethysmography, Whole Body
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - chemically induced - immunology - pathology
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Abstract
Trimellitic anhydride (TMA) is a cause of asthma in man. Dose-dependent TMA-specific IgE, histopathology, and airway responses after sensitization by inhalation were examined in the Brown Norway rat. Rats were exposed to 0.04, 0.4, 4, or 40 mg/m3 TMA aerosol for 10 min, once a week, over 10 weeks. All lower exposures were, subsequently, rechallenged to 40 mg/m3 TMA aerosol. All rats received a sham exposure 1 week prior to the first TMA exposure. Following the sham exposure and weekly after each TMA exposure, TMA-specific IgE and both early-phase airway response (EAR) and late-phase airway response (LAR) were measured using enhanced pause (Penh). All rats sensitized by 40 mg/m3 TMA developed specific IgE, EAR, and LAR to one or more of the challenges to 40 mg/m3 TMA. TMA of 4 mg/m3 induced a much lower, but stable, specific IgE response. EAR and LAR were observed only after a 40 mg/m3 TMA rechallenge in this group, but it was much larger than that observed in the 40 mg/m3 TMA-sensitized and challenged group. Exposure-dependent histopathological changes noted included eosinophilic granulomatous interstitial pneumonia, perivascular eosinophil infiltrates, bronchial-associated lymphoid tissue hyperplasia, and peribronchiolar plasma cell infiltrates.
PubMed ID
16982671 View in PubMed
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An animal model for therapeutic intervention studies of CMV infection in the immunocompromised host.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57796
Source
Arch Virol. 1990;114(1-2):91-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
F S Stals
F. Bosman
C P van Boven
C A Bruggeman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Limburg, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
Source
Arch Virol. 1990;114(1-2):91-107
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - administration & dosage
Antigens, Viral - analysis
Cytomegalovirus Infections - immunology - pathology - therapy
DNA Probes
Disease Models, Animal
Genes, Viral
Immune Tolerance
Immunization, Passive
Male
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Organ Specificity
Rats
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Abstract
An experimental rat model to study acute cytomegalovirus infections is described. Eight-week old male Brown Norway rats, immunosuppressed by total body irradiation, were infected with rat cytomegalovirus (RCMV). The effects of infection were determined by survival rates and the presence of virus or viral components in different organs was assayed by plaque test, immunoperoxidase staining, dot-blot DNA hybridization and in situ DNA hybridization. At days 10-post infection nearly 90% of the animals had died. Spleen, liver and bone marrow were heavily infected. Interstitial pneumonia was observed. Pathological findings strongly resembled the full scale of lesions in human CMV infections. Anti-RCMV hyperimmune serum was effective against mortality from RCMV infection and viral spread to lungs and liver was prevented. This model is appropriate for studies on the pathogenesis and antiviral therapy of CMV infections in the immunocompromised host.
PubMed ID
2171466 View in PubMed
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Basophil mediated pro-allergic inflammation in vehicle-emitted particles exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282459
Source
Environ Res. 2017 Jan;152:308-314
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Alexander M Zakharenko
Ayse Basak Engin
Valery V Chernyshev
Vladimir V Chaika
Sergey M Ugay
Ramin Rezaee
Gholamreza Karimi
Vladimir A Drozd
Anna V Nikitina
Sergey F Solomennik
Olga R Kudryavkina
Liu Xin
Yuan Wenpeng
Manolis Tzatzarakis
Aristidis M Tsatsakis
Kirill S Golokhvast
Source
Environ Res. 2017 Jan;152:308-314
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Animals
Automobiles
Basophils - drug effects - immunology
Inflammation - chemically induced - immunology
Male
Mice
Particulate Matter - toxicity
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - toxicity
Russia
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Vehicle Emissions - toxicity
Abstract
Despite of the fact that engine manufacturers develop a new technology to reduce exhaust emissions, insufficient attention given to particulate emissions. However, diesel exhaust particles are a major source of air-borne pollution, contain vast amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and may have deleterious effects on the immune system, resulting in the induction and enhancement of pro-allergic processes. In the current study, vehicle emitted particles (VEP) from 2 different types of cars (diesel - D and gasoline - G) and locomotive (L) were collected. Overall, 129 four-week-old, male SPF-class Kunming mice were subcutaneously instilled with either low dose 100, 250 or high dose, 500mg/kg VEP and 15 mice were assigned as control group. The systemic toxicity was evaluated and alterations in the percentages of the CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD25 expressing cells, basophils, eosinophils and neutrophils were determined. Basophil percentages were inversely associated with the PAH content of the VEPs, however basophil sensitization was more important than cell count in VEP exposure. Thus, the effects of VEP-PAHs emerge with the activation of basophils in an allergen independent fashion. Despite the increased percentage of CD4+ T cells, a sharp decrease in basophil counts at 500mg/kg of VEP indicates a decreased inhibitory effect of CD16+ monocytes on the proliferation of CD4+ T cell and suppressed polarization into a Th2 phenotype. Therefore, although the restrictions for vehicles emissions differ between countries, follow up studies and strict regulations are needed.
PubMed ID
27833058 View in PubMed
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Bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway wall remodelling induced by exposure to allergen for 9 weeks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15634
Source
Allergy. 1999 Oct;54(10):1074-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
Z H Cui
B E Skoogh
T. Pullerits
J. Lötvall
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 1999 Oct;54(10):1074-82
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Airway Resistance
Allergens - adverse effects
Animals
Antibodies - blood
Bronchi - pathology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - blood - immunology - pathology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Male
Muscle, Smooth - pathology
Phthalic Anhydrides - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory System - pathology
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Time Factors
Abstract
Prolonged exposure to allergen has been proposed to be important for the development of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway remodelling in asthma. The present study was designed to examine the effect of chronic allergen exposure on bronchial responsiveness, eosinophil infiltration, and airway remodelling. We sensitized brown Norway rats with the occupational allergen trimellitic anhydride (TMA) and exposed the animals to TMA conjugated to rat serum albumin (TMA-RSA) on 5 consecutive days each week for 9 weeks, starting 4 weeks after sensitization. IgE and IgG anti-TMA antibodies in serum and bronchial responsiveness to acetylcholine were evaluated before and at weeks 3, 6, and 9 of allergen exposure. Thickness of the airway wall, airway luminal narrowing, and the number of goblet cells and eosinophils in the airway wall were evaluated with an image analysis system in lungs resected after the last assessment of bronchial responsiveness, at the end of the 9-week allergen exposure. All rats developed IgE and IgG anti-TMA antibodies after sensitization. The levels of antibodies increased with allergen exposure until week 6, and then declined. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine was induced in allergen-exposed rats without ongoing airway eosinophilia. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness induced by chronic allergen exposure via inhalation was accompanied by significantly increased thickness of smooth muscle and airway narrowing in the small airways, and goblet cell hyperplasia in the large airways. We conclude that chronic exposure to allergen can induce bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway wall remodelling. Airway wall remodelling may contribute to bronchial hyperresponsiveness.
PubMed ID
10536886 View in PubMed
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Control and eradication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus type 2 using a modified-live type 2 vaccine in combination with a load, close, homogenise model: an area elimination study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279572
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2017 Jan 05;59(1):4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-05-2017
Author
Poul H Rathkjen
Johannes Dall
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2017 Jan 05;59(1):4
Date
Jan-05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Denmark
Disease Eradication - methods
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Models, Theoretical
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome - prevention & control - virology
Porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus - genetics - immunology
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Swine
Viral Vaccines - genetics - immunology - standards
Abstract
Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes significant animal and economic losses worldwide. The infection is difficult to control and PRRSV elimination at local level requires coordinated intervention among multiple farms. This case study describes a successful elimination of PRRSV from all 12 herds on the Horne Peninsula, Denmark, using a combination of load, close, homogenise (LCH) using PRRSV type 2 modified-live vaccine, optimised pig flow, and'10 Golden Rules' (10GR) for biosecurity management. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first successful European PRRSV area elimination project documented in detail. The PRRSV type 2 modified-live vaccine was used as part of the LCH method in breeding herds. Complete or partial depopulation was performed in some infected herds. A simplified biosecurity protocol (10GR) based on the McREBEL™ system of pig flow management, was employed in all herds and at all times throughout the study.
At study commencement, all herds were infected with PRRSV, and most were actively shedding virus. In just over 18 months, all 12 herds on the Horne Peninsula were confirmed to be PRRSV negative by polymerase chain reaction testing and negative for antibodies against PRRSV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay testing. All herds were subsequently obtained 'Specific Pathogen Free' status for PRRSV.
This study provides compelling evidence suggesting that an area elimination plan combining LCH with PRRSV type 2 vaccination, optimised pig flow, and 10GR for biosecurity management can effectively eliminate PRRSV from a geographic area. Additionally this study confirms the value of a previously unpublished, simplified alternative to the McREBEL system for controlling PRRSV.
PubMed ID
28057035 View in PubMed
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Effect of topical immunomodulators on acute allergic inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness in sensitised rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15402
Source
Eur J Pharmacol. 2002 Feb 22;437(3):187-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-2002
Author
Tung Jung Huang
Paul Eynott
Michael Salmon
Paul L Nicklin
K Fan Chung
Author Affiliation
Thoracic Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College School of Medicine, Dovehouse Street, London SW3 6LY, UK.
Source
Eur J Pharmacol. 2002 Feb 22;437(3):187-94
Date
Feb-22-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetylcholine - pharmacology
Administration, Topical
Animals
Asthma - genetics - immunology - prevention & control
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - genetics - immunology - prevention & control
Bronchodilator Agents - pharmacology
Budesonide - pharmacology
Cyclosporins - pharmacology
Cytokines - genetics
Disease Models, Animal
Gene Expression Regulation - drug effects
Immunosuppressive Agents - pharmacology
Inflammation - genetics - immunology - prevention & control
Male
Ovalbumin - administration & dosage - immunology
RNA, Messenger - drug effects - genetics - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sirolimus - analogs & derivatives - pharmacology
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
T-Lymphocytes - cytology - drug effects - immunology
Vasodilator Agents - pharmacology
Abstract
We examined the effects of different immunomodulators administered topically on asthmatic responses in a rat model of asthma. Sensitised Brown-Norway rats were administered rapamycin, SAR943 (32-deoxorapamycin), IMM125 (a hydroxyethyl derivative of D-serine(8)-cyclosporine), and budesonide by intratracheal instillation 1 h prior to allergen challenge. Allergen exposure induced bronchial hyperresponsiveness, accumulation of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and also an increase in eosinophils and CD2+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the airways. Interleukin-2, interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-10, and interferon-gamma mRNA expression was upregulated by allergen exposure. Budesonide abolished airway inflammation, suppressed the mRNA expression for interleukin-2, interleukin-4, and interleukin-5 (P
PubMed ID
11890908 View in PubMed
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[Effects of DL-alpha-lipoic acid on the experimentally induced diabetic cataract in rats]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47193
Source
Zhonghua Yan Ke Za Zhi. 2004 Mar;40(3):193-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Li Sun
Jin-Song Zhang
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, China. sunlishu@hotmail.com
Source
Zhonghua Yan Ke Za Zhi. 2004 Mar;40(3):193-6
Date
Mar-2004
Language
Chinese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Cataract - drug therapy - etiology - metabolism
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental - complications
Disease Models, Animal
English Abstract
Female
Glutathione - metabolism
Rats
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Thioctic Acid - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether DL-alpha-lipoic acid (LA) can offer lenticular protection in diabetic rats. METHOD: 36 Brown-Norway (BN) specific pathogen free (SPF) rats (7 week-old, female), were divided into 3 groups comprising of the diabetes mellitus (DM) group (14 rats), the diabetes mellitus treated with LA (DM + LA) group (14 rats), and the control (CTL) group (8 rats). The diabetic cataract was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) injection. Powdered food mixed with 0.3% LA was given to the DM + LA group, 3 days after STZ injection. Lens density was measured with EAS-1000, blood glucose and lens glutathione concentration was examined. RESULT: 2 weeks after STZ injection, there was a subcapsular reticular opacity in the DM; Lens opacity became more severe and enlarged with increased duration of STZ exposure. 4 weeks later, there was slight lens opacity in the DM + LA group. After 5 weeks, there were significant differences in lens densities between the DM and the DM + LA groups (P 0.05); At 80 days, the concentration of blood glucose in the DM + LA was less than that of in the DM (P 0.05). CONCLUSION: LA ingested orally can effectively reduce STZ-induced blood glucose and inhibit diabetic cataractogenesis in rats.
PubMed ID
15307993 View in PubMed
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Generalized cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and CMV-induced pneumonitis in the rat: combined effect of 9-(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxymethyl)guanine and specific antibody treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57690
Source
Antiviral Res. 1994 Oct;25(2):147-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
F S Stals
S S Wagenaar
C A Bruggeman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Limburg, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
Source
Antiviral Res. 1994 Oct;25(2):147-60
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - therapeutic use
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Combined Modality Therapy
Cytomegalovirus - isolation & purification
Cytomegalovirus Infections - drug therapy - immunology - therapy
Ganciclovir - therapeutic use
Immune Sera
Immunization, Passive
Immunocompromised Host
Lung - virology
Lung Diseases, Interstitial - drug therapy - immunology - therapy - virology
Male
Pneumonia, Viral - drug therapy - immunology - therapy
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Spleen - virology
Abstract
The combined effect of 9-(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxymethyl)guanine (DHPG, ganciclovir) and hyper immune serum (HIS) was studied in two different rat models. In the first model, a lethal generalized rat cytomegalovirus (RCMV) infection was established in immunosuppressed Brown Norway (BN) rats. Treatment with DHPG or hyper immune serum (HIS) effectively reduced both mortality rate and virus titers in the liver and lungs. By combined treatment the effective dose of both DHPG and HIS was reduced to 25%. The fractionary effective dose was 0.5, indicating a moderate synergistic effect on survival. Combined treatment also established a significant reduction of virus titers in lungs and liver (P
PubMed ID
7847876 View in PubMed
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Heterologous challenge with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) vaccine virus: no evidence of reactivation of previous European-type PRRS virus infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57537
Source
Vet Microbiol. 1999 Aug 31;68(3-4):187-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-31-1999
Author
A. Bøtner
J. Nielsen
M B Oleksiewicz
T. Storgaard
Author Affiliation
Danish Veterinary Institute for Virus Research, Lindholm, Kalvehave. ab@vetvirus.dk
Source
Vet Microbiol. 1999 Aug 31;68(3-4):187-95
Date
Aug-31-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cells, Cultured
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay - veterinary
Europe
Female
Immunoenzyme Techniques - veterinary
Lung - virology
Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome - immunology
Porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus - immunology - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Pregnancy
RNA, Viral - analysis - blood
Random Allocation
Recurrence
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Swine
Tonsil - virology
United States
Vaccination - veterinary
Vaccines, Attenuated - administration & dosage - immunology
Viral Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Abstract
In Denmark, a porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) control programme, comprising vaccination of seropositive herds with a live American type PRRSV vaccine, was started in 1996. In several of these herds, spread of vaccine virus from vaccinated 3-18 week old pigs to non-vaccinated sows was demonstrated by the isolation of vaccine virus from fetuses and stillborn piglets. Surprisingly, sows infected with the American type vaccine strain consistently exhibited significantly stronger serological responses towards European type PRRSV than American type PRRSV. In order to elucidate whether the unexpectedly strong serological reaction towards European-type PRRSV in American type PRRSV infected sows was due to a booster reaction, or reactivation of an unrecognized, latent infection in the sows with European type PRRSV, a challenge study with the vaccine was carried out. In this study, the stronger serological response towards European type PRRSV than towards American type PRRSV was reproduced, and reactivation of the previous natural infection with European PRRSV could neither be demonstrated by virus isolation nor by RT-PCR. So, the increase in antibody titers towards European PRRSV in previously European PRRSV infected pigs after challenge with the vaccine strain seems to be the result of a boosting effect on the immune system, induced by the heterologous vaccine PRRSV strain.
PubMed ID
10510038 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.