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34 records – page 1 of 4.

[About the meeting of the leaders of tuberculosis-controlling services of the subjects of the Russian Federation on progress in 2003].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174866
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2005;(2):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005

Another face of medicine. A report from Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221301
Source
Minn Med. 1993 Apr;76(4):11-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
L J Cohen
Author Affiliation
Community Health Center and Lakeview Memorial Hospital, Two Harbors, Minnesota.
Source
Minn Med. 1993 Apr;76(4):11-5
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Developing Countries
Family Practice - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Medical Missions, Official
Physician's Role
Rural Health - trends
Russia
Social Change
Specialization - trends
PubMed ID
8515731 View in PubMed
Less detail

Child and adolescent mental health policy and plans in Canada: an analytic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139032
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2010 Nov;55(11):746; author reply 746
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010

Consultation-liaison psychiatry as a subspecialty. A Canadian survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220010
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 1993 Nov;15(6):386-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1993
Author
J R Swenson
S. Abbey
D E Stewart
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Consultation-Liaison Service, Ottawa General Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 1993 Nov;15(6):386-91
Date
Nov-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Curriculum - trends
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Care Team - trends
Psychiatry - education - trends
Psychosomatic Medicine - education - trends
Referral and Consultation - trends
Specialization - trends
Abstract
In Canada, in recent years, there has been increased interest in the issue of subspecialization in psychiatry. One hundred and forty-four members of the Section on Psychosomatic Medicine of the Canadian Psychiatric Association responded to a survey about their opinions on teaching, training, continuing education, and designation of consultation-liaison (C-L) psychiatry as a subspecialty. Fifty-five percent of respondents agreed that C-L psychiatry should receive designation as a psychiatric subspecialty, 35% were opposed, and 10% did not give an opinion. The results also indicated that formal teaching in C-L psychiatry has increased, particularly over the past 20 years; that training in C-L psychiatry is believed by many to have been inadequate, regardless of when the training took place; and recent graduates were more likely than psychiatrists graduating more than 10 years ago to agree that C-L psychiatry should be designated as a subspecialty. Psychiatrists who devote more of their time to the care of patients with combined medical and psychiatric illness were also more likely to favor subspecialty designation. Factors unique to Canada that may influence attitudes toward psychiatric subspecialization include the number and geographic distribution of psychiatrists, their educational background, and governmental funding priorities.
PubMed ID
8112562 View in PubMed
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[Development of the oncology service in the Ukrainian SSR]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27102
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1982;28(10):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982

Developments in nursing call for new nursing specialties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171700
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2005 Nov-Dec;3(2):6-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gyslaine Desrosiers
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2005 Nov-Dec;3(2):6-9
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Nurse Clinicians - education - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Philosophy, Nursing
Quebec
Societies, Nursing
Specialization - trends
Specialties, Nursing - education - organization & administration
Abstract
The increasing complexity of care is creating new challenges for the profession. If we are to meet them successfully, the Order feels that new specialties must be recognized.
PubMed ID
16329674 View in PubMed
Less detail

From community mental health services to specialized psychiatry: the effects of a change in policy on patient accessibility and care utilization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73744
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 Aug;82(2):157-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
C G Stefansson
J. Cullberg
L. Steinholtz Ekecrantz
Author Affiliation
Psychosocial Research Unit, Nacka, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 Aug;82(2):157-64
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Deinstitutionalization - trends
Female
Health Policy - trends
Health Services Accessibility - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Psychiatry - trends
Psychotherapy - trends
Socioeconomic Factors
Specialism - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In 1975, a community mental health (CMH) centre with most of its resources channelled to outpatient services was set up in a defined catchment area of 75,000 inhabitants near Stockholm. In 1981, the CMH centre was allocated 3 inpatient wards of its own. An outpatient unit to treat long-term psychotic patients was also built up from existing resources. Emergency cases were directed to the primary health care services or to the emergency department of a hospital. During the same period, the number of doctors in the area's primary health care services increased fourfold. The social, demographic and diagnostic composition of the patient population and its utilization of in- and outpatient care in connection with these organizational changes are described. The population of the cathment area increased by 12.5% and the patient population decreased by 40%. The decrease was particularly great among first-time visitors (-54%), patients from lower social groups (-53%) and those with crisis diagnosis (-71%). The number of patients with psychoses increased (+26%). Outpatient visits and hospital utilization increased by one third. The number of compulsory admissions increased by 20% (still being far below the mean number in Stockholm). The decrease in the patient population is attributed to the reduction in accessibility to the CMH centre at a time when primary care services in the area were undergoing a sizeable expansion. The increased care utilization is the result of an internal redistribution of resources in favour of resource-demanding, long-term psychotic patients.
PubMed ID
2239361 View in PubMed
Less detail

Geriatric psychiatry education in Canada: the pathway to subspecialty recognition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143509
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2010 Sep;22(6):919-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Melissa H Andrew
Catherine Shea
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatric Psychiatry, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. andrewm@queensu.ca
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2010 Sep;22(6):919-26
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Curriculum - standards
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Education, Medical, Graduate - trends
Forecasting
Geriatric Psychiatry - education - manpower
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Patient Care Team - standards
Physicians, Primary Care - education
Population Dynamics
Psychiatry - education
Specialization - trends
Abstract
This paper outlines the evolution of the training of Canadian physicians and other professionals in the mental health care needs of older adults over the past 2 decades, which has culminated in long-awaited subspecialty recognition by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC). Despite the fact that Canada has more than 4000 psychiatrists officially recognized by RCPSC, and a national body of more than 200 members who practice primarily in geriatric psychiatry, the status of geriatric psychiatry as a subspecialty of psychiatry in Canada remained "unofficial" until 2009.
Early along the pathway toward subspecialization, Canadian educational efforts focused on enhancing the capacity of primary care physicians and other mental health professionals to meet the mental health needs of older adults. Over the past decade, and with the encouragement of RCPSC, Canadian psychiatric educators have carefully and collaboratively defined the competencies necessary for general psychiatrists to practice across the life span, thereby influencing the psychiatry training programs to include dedicated time in geriatric psychiatry, and a more consistently defined training experience.
With these two important building blocks in place, Canadian psychiatry was truly ready to move ahead with subspecialization. Three new psychiatric subspecialties - geriatric, child and adolescent, and forensic - were approved at the RCPSC in September 2009.
The developments of the past 20 years have paved the way for a subspecialty geriatric psychiatry curriculum that will be well-aligned with a new general psychiatry curriculum, and ready to complement the existing mental health work force with subspecialized skills aimed at caring for the most complex elderly patients.
PubMed ID
20478094 View in PubMed
Less detail

Geropsychiatry--a challenge for the '90s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225479
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1991 Nov;36(9):623-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
Author
W J Pankratz
Author Affiliation
Lion's Gate Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1991 Nov;36(9):623-9
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Clinical Competence
Curriculum - trends
Forecasting
Geriatric Psychiatry - education - trends
Health Resources - trends
Humans
Psychiatry - education - trends
Specialization - trends
PubMed ID
1773397 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Healing architecture=future hospitals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176483
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Dec 13;166(51):4702-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-13-2004
Author
Lars Juel Thiis
Author Affiliation
Cubo Arkitekterne A/S, Arhus. ljtk@cubo.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Dec 13;166(51):4702-5
Date
Dec-13-2004
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Architecture as Topic - trends
Denmark
Environment Design - trends
Hospital Design and Construction - trends
Hospitals, County - trends
Hospitals, Special - trends
Humans
Treatment Outcome
PubMed ID
15669526 View in PubMed
Less detail

34 records – page 1 of 4.