Skip header and navigation

Refine By

37 records – page 1 of 4.

[About standardization of specialized medical care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291369
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2016 May-Jun; 24(3):156-9
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
I V Uspenkaia
A A Nizov
E V Manukhina
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2016 May-Jun; 24(3):156-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration - standards
Health Care Reform
Hospitalization
Humans
Medicine - methods - standards
Program Development
Quality Improvement - organization & administration
Russia
Specialization - standards
Abstract
The article presents materials of studying of such important problem of health care as standardization of specialized medical care provided in conditions of hospital and modernization of regional health care. The issues of standardization of specialized medical care are considered in medical, economic and social aspects. The implementation of medical standards was determined as one of main tasks of the regional program of modernization of health care. The program was developed with direct involvement of the authors of article. The comparative analysis of classes of diseases and nosologic forms on main indices of hospitalized morbidity and lethality was used for substantiation of priority of implementing medical standards in the region. The questionnaire survey was carried out on sampling of 510 patients of hospitals. The sociological questionnaire survey was applied to sampling of 8732 patients comprised by system of mandatory medical insurance. Such an approach determined reliability of derived results. The expertise of medical standards was implemented by 124 experienced and competent physicians participating in implementation of medical standards. The results of expertise confirmed expediency of implementation of medical standards. Kepy following shortcomings were established: inadequate financing; lacking of modern equipment and analysis techniques in hospitals, etc. The article presents evidences of effectiveness of process of standardization of specialized of medical care provided in hospital conditions. The basis of such an assumption was reliable increasing of level of satisfaction of quality of its organization and achievement of planned indices of "road map" in the section of increasing of salary of medical workers and decreasing of mortality of population because of controllable causes.
PubMed ID
29553232 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to treatment and educational inequalities in cancer survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266954
Source
J Health Econ. 2014 Jul;36:98-111
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Jon H Fiva
Torbjørn Hægeland
Marte Rønning
Astri Syse
Source
J Health Econ. 2014 Jul;36:98-111
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cancer Care Facilities - utilization
Educational Status
Female
Geography
Health Behavior
Health Services Accessibility
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Physician-Patient Relations
Quality of Health Care
Referral and Consultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Specialization - standards - statistics & numerical data
Survival Analysis
Travel
Abstract
The public health care systems in the Nordic countries provide high quality care almost free of charge to all citizens. However, social inequalities in health persist. Previous research has, for example, documented substantial educational inequalities in cancer survival. We investigate to what extent this may be driven by differential access to and utilization of high quality treatment options. Quasi-experimental evidence based on the establishment of regional cancer wards indicates that (i) highly educated individuals utilized centralized specialized treatment to a greater extent than less educated patients and (ii) the use of such treatment improved these patients' survival.
PubMed ID
24780404 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A gynecologic examination is not like examining ears]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60560
Source
Vardfacket. 1980 Aug 28;4(15):4-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-1980

Antibiotic misuse in a pediatric teaching hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246176
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1980 Jan 12;122(1):49-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-12-1980
Author
E. Schollenberg
W L Albritton
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1980 Jan 12;122(1):49-52
Date
Jan-12-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Drug Utilization
Hospital Bed Capacity, 100 to 299
Hospitals, Pediatric - standards
Hospitals, Special - standards
Hospitals, Teaching - standards
Humans
Manitoba
Medical Audit
Substance-Related Disorders
Utilization Review
Abstract
Antibiotic use at a pediatric teaching hospital was reviewed for a month. A total of 188 courses of therapy were evaluated with respect to choice of antibiotic, dosage and necessity of treatment. Errors in therapy were noted in 30% of the medical orders and 63% of the surgical orders. The most frequent error, unnecessary therapy, was found in 13% and 45% of the medical and surgical orders respectively. Error rates were highest for the most frequently ordered antibiotics, notably the penicillins. The magnitude of the problem appeared to be similar to that previously reported from general ana adult hospitals. The difficulties with solutions such as educational programs and compulsory consultation are discussed.
Notes
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1969 Jun;119(6):662-55795107
Cites: JAMA. 1970 Jul 13;213(2):264-75467892
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1970 Nov;122(5):419-315476392
Cites: Lancet. 1970 Dec 12;2(7685):1213-54099781
Cites: Am J Hosp Pharm. 1972 Oct;29(10):828-345075122
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1973 Sep;126(3):318-214201014
Cites: Am J Hosp Pharm. 1973 Oct;30(10):892-74747028
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1973 Oct;79(4):555-604795880
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1974 Aug;130(2):165-84842338
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1975 Dec 18;293(25):1291-51186823
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Feb 5;116(3):229-32837297
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Feb 5;116(3):253-6837301
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Feb 5;116(3):256-9837302
Cites: South Med J. 1977 Feb;70(2):215-8, 221841406
Cites: Arch Surg. 1977 Mar;112(3):326-34320960
Cites: Am J Med Sci. 1977 Jan-Feb;273(1):79-85557900
Cites: JAMA. 1977 Jun 27;237(26):2819-22577245
Cites: Lancet. 1977 Nov 26;2(8048):1118-2273021
Cites: Mt Sinai J Med. 1978 Jul-Aug;45(4):489-94309073
Cites: Surg Gynecol Obstet. 1965 Feb;120:243-5414257927
Cites: Surgery. 1961 Jul;50:161-816722001
PubMed ID
7363195 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are some of the challenging aspects of the CanMEDS roles valid outside Canada?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81305
Source
Med Educ. 2006 Aug;40(8):807-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Ringsted Charlotte
Hansen Torben Lindskov
Davis Deborah
Scherpbier Albert
Author Affiliation
Centre of Clinical Education, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. charlotte.ringsted@rh.hosp.dk
Source
Med Educ. 2006 Aug;40(8):807-15
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Competency-Based Education
Denmark
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Specialism - standards
Abstract
CONTEXT: Many countries have adopted the CanMEDS roles. However, there is limited information on how these apply in an international context and in different specialties. OBJECTIVES: To survey trainee and specialist ratings of the importance of the CanMEDS roles and perceived ability to perform tasks within the roles. METHODS: We surveyed 8749 doctors within a defined region (eastern Denmark) via a single-issue, mailed questionnaire. Each of the 7 roles was represented by 3 questionnaire items to be rated for perceived importance and confidence in ability to perform the role. RESULTS: Responses were received from 3476 doctors (42.8%), including 190 interns, 201 doctors in the introductory year of specialist training, 529 residents and 2152 specialists. The overall mean rating of importance (on a scale of 1-5) of the aspects of competence described in the CanMEDS roles was 4.2 (standard deviation 0.6) and did not differ between trainee groups and specialists. Mean ratings of confidence were lower than ratings of importance and increased across the groups from interns to specialists. Differences between specialty groups were evident in both importance and confidence for many of the roles. For laboratory, technical and, to a lesser extent, cognitive specialties, the role of Health Advocate scored the lowest in importance. For general medicine specialties, the roles of Medical Expert, Collaborator, Manager and Scholar all scored lower for importance and confidence. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a sketch of the content and construct validity of the CanMEDS roles in a non-Canadian setting. More research is needed in how these aspects of competence can be best taught and applied across specialties in different jurisdictions.
Notes
ReprintIn: Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Jun 11;169(24):2329-3217594852
PubMed ID
16869928 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Cancer treatment and centralization]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature28564
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1969 Jun 15;89(12):1003-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1969
Author
O H Iversen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1969 Jun 15;89(12):1003-6
Date
Jun-15-1969
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hospitals, Special - standards
Humans
Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Norway
Physician-Patient Relations
Scandinavia
State Medicine
PubMed ID
5799881 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Comparative analysis of effectiveness of medical care service for patients with stroke in neurological and specialized departments for the treatment of patients with stroke].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153421
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2009;109(10 Suppl 2):52-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
V E Tsurikova
L V Stakhovskaia
M K Boldykhov
K V Shekhovtsova
T I Rozhkova
V I Skvortsova
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2009;109(10 Suppl 2):52-6
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, Special - standards
Humans
Intensive Care - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Stroke - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
A comparative analysis of effectiveness of medical care service for patients with stroke in neurological and a specialized departments for the treatment of patients with stroke has been carried out in the regional hospital. The specialized department had an intensive therapy block that made it possible to conduct twenty-four-hour monitoring of main parameters of vital functions and oxygenotherapy. Patients who were in need of artificial lung ventilation were placed to a department of general reanimation. In the end of the acute period, the level of disability significantly decreased in patients with ischemic stroke. The significant decrease of disability level was found in patients with ischemic as well as with hemorrhagic stroke after 3 months. The results suggest the higher effectiveness of therapy conducted in specialized departments.
PubMed ID
20229634 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of processes of care and clinical outcomes for patients newly hospitalized for heart failure attended by different physician specialists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127327
Source
Am Heart J. 2012 Feb;163(2):252-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Nicole K Boom
Douglas S Lee
Jack V Tu
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am Heart J. 2012 Feb;163(2):252-9
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiology - standards
Family Practice - standards
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - therapy
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Ontario
Physician's Practice Patterns
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Referral and Consultation
Retrospective Studies
Specialization - standards
Abstract
Previous studies suggest that patients with heart failure (HF) treated by cardiologists have improved outcomes compared with patients treated by other physicians. It remains unclear whether these findings reflect differences in patient characteristics, processes of care, practice setting, or a combination of these factors.
We examined physician specialty-related differences in processes of care and clinical outcomes for 7,634 patients newly hospitalized for HF in Ontario, Canada, who were included in the EFFECT study between April 2004 and March 2005. Patients were categorized according to whether they received cardiologist, generalist (e.g., internist or family doctor), or generalist care with cardiology consultation.
Multivariable hierarchical modeling demonstrated that patients treated by generalists alone had higher risk of 30-day (odds ratio [OR] 1.50, 95% CI 1.18-1.91) and 1-year mortality (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.10-1.50), as well as the 1-year composite outcome of death and readmission, compared with patients treated by cardiologists. These differences were significantly attenuated if patients who had "do not resuscitate" orders were excluded. Patients who had a cardiologist involved in their care were more likely to undergo diagnostic procedures, such as echocardiography, and had higher rates of certain evidence-based pharmacologic therapy such as ß-blockers.
Physician specialty-related differences in HF outcomes appear to reflect a combination of both case-mix differences and differences in the use of certain heart failure processes of care. These findings suggest that it may be possible to improve HF outcomes in patients receiving care from generalist physicians.
PubMed ID
22305844 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Complications of deliveries at private maternity clinics in the County of Copenhagen. Two patient groups with a 10-year interval]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65581
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1985 Sep 2;147(36):2849-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2-1985

[Criteria for evaluating the activities of a specialized oncological service]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27431
Source
Klin Khir. 1979 May;(5):51-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1979

37 records – page 1 of 4.