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Acute effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory admissions: results from APHEA 2 project. Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15434
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2001
Author
R W Atkinson
H R Anderson
J. Sunyer
J. Ayres
M. Baccini
J M Vonk
A. Boumghar
F. Forastiere
B. Forsberg
G. Touloumi
J. Schwartz
K. Katsouyanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, St. George's Hospital Medical School, London, United Kingdom. atkinson@sghms.ac.uk
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Date
Nov-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
England - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Italy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Particle Size
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Population Surveillance
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Spain - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Weather
Abstract
The APHEA 2 project investigated short-term health effects of particles in eight European cities. In each city associations between particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microm (PM(10)) and black smoke and daily counts of emergency hospital admissions for asthma (0-14 and 15-64 yr), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and all-respiratory disease (65+ yr) controlling for environmental factors and temporal patterns were investigated. Summary PM(10) effect estimates (percentage change in mean number of daily admissions per 10 microg/m(3) increase) were asthma (0-14 yr) 1.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 2.3), asthma (15-64 yr) 1.1% (0.3, 1.8), and COPD plus asthma and all-respiratory (65+ yr) 1.0% (0.4, 1.5) and 0.9% (0.6, 1.3). The combined estimates for Black Smoke tended to be smaller and less precisely estimated than for PM(10). Variability in the sizes of the PM(10) effect estimates between cities was also investigated. In the 65+ groups PM(10) estimates were positively associated with annual mean concentrations of ozone in the cities. For asthma admissions (0-14 yr) a number of city-specific factors, including smoking prevalence, explained some of their variability. This study confirms that particle concentrations in European cities are positively associated with increased numbers of admissions for respiratory diseases and that some of the variation in PM(10) effect estimates between cities can be explained by city characteristics.
PubMed ID
11734437 View in PubMed
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[A descriptive clinical study of a type of arthritis in beekeepers of the Badajoz area of La Siberia Extremeña]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14332
Source
Med Clin (Barc). 1995 Jul 1;105(5):164-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1995
Author
J. Peña
J M Salazar
R. Ortega
J L Alvarez
J E Campillo
M D Torres
Author Affiliation
Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad de Medicina, Hospital Infanta Cristina, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz.
Source
Med Clin (Barc). 1995 Jul 1;105(5):164-7
Date
Jul-1-1995
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Arthritis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Bees
Chronic Disease
Diagnosis, Differential
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Insect Bites and Stings - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Random Allocation
Spain - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The appearance of episodes of arthritis has been detected in beekeepers in the Siberia Extremadura (Spain) related to working with the hives. This present work describes the clinical features of such arthritic syndrome. METHODS: Sixty cases were selected at random from a previous epidemiological study to undergo a clinical protocol that included, anamnesis, physical signs, haematological, biochemical and immunological analyses, and radiological exploration of hands, wrists, feet, and pelvis. RESULTS: The picture is characterized by episodes of oligoarthritis associated with bee-stings in the affected joints or nearby. The most frequent radiologic lesions are pinched articular lines, sclerosis, and the presence of geodes. Analytically, there was frequent eosinophilia, abnormalities in haemostasis tests, and a rise in serum alkaline phosphatase. CONCLUSIONS: An acute inflammatory oligoarthritis of unknown cause has been described which affects the hands asymmetrically, and which is found in beekeepers in relation to their work with the hives. It occasionally involves into a chronic localized arthropathy capable of provoking ankylosis and permanent articular disability.
PubMed ID
7630227 View in PubMed
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[Adherence to international recommendations in the fight against antimicrobial resistance - Substantial difference between outpatient consumption in Spain and Denmark].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278374
Source
Rev Esp Quimioter. 2016 Feb;29(1):40-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Sara Malo
María José Rabanaque
Lars Bjerrum
Source
Rev Esp Quimioter. 2016 Feb;29(1):40-3
Date
Feb-2016
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Cephalosporins
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Drug Utilization
Fluoroquinolones
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Macrolides
Outpatients
Spain - epidemiology
Abstract
Increasing antibiotic resistance represents a major public health threat that jeopardises the future treatment of bacterial infections. This study aims to describe the adherence to recommendations proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO) Advisory Group on Integrated Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance (AGISAR), in Spain and Denmark, and to analyse the relation between the outpatient use of Critically Important Antimicrobials (CIA) and the bacterial resistance rates to these agents.
The Antimicrobial consumption interactive database (ESAC-Net) and Antimicrobial resistance interactive database (EARS-Net) provided data on outpatient use (2010-2013) of CIA (fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and 3rd and 4th generation cephalosporins) and the percentages of isolates of the main pathogens causing serious infections, resistant to these agents.
The use of cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones, as well as the percentage of bacteria resistant, is higher in Spain than in Denmark. Although consumption of macrolides in both countries is similar, the proportion of Streptococcus pneumoniae resistant to macrolides is significantly higher in Spain.
The high outpatient consumption of CIA agents in Spain deviates substantially from the WHO recommendations. Moreover, it has the effect of elevated rates of antimicrobial resistance, that are lower in Denmark.
PubMed ID
26809795 View in PubMed
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[Agricultural occupation and strongyloidiasis. A case-control study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194720
Source
Rev Clin Esp. 2001 Feb;201(2):81-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
D. Rodríguez Calabuig
R. Igual Adell
C. Oltra Alcaraz
P. Sánchez Sánchez
M. Bustamante Balen
F. Parra Godoy
E. Nagore Enguidanos
Author Affiliation
Centro de Salud Jaume Roig, Oliva, Valencia. med002652@nacom.es
Source
Rev Clin Esp. 2001 Feb;201(2):81-4
Date
Feb-2001
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Agricultural Workers' Diseases
Animals
Case-Control Studies
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Spain - epidemiology
Strongyloides stercoralis - isolation & purification
Strongyloidiasis - epidemiology
Abstract
In the last few years, Strongyloides stercoralis has been repeatedly recovered from indigenous farmers in the Safor area (Valencia Community). The relationship between the different occupational activities, mainly farming, and the presence of strongyloidiasis was investigated.
A paired case-control study was designed. The investigation was conducted at Oliva Centro de Salud, from October 1997 to October 1999. Diagnosis was established when Strongyloides stercoralis was observed in any of the three serial fecal samples requested when eosinophilia was observed in the hemogram. Controls were persons matched by sex and age (+/- 5) years, with no eosinophilia in the hemogram and in whom the presence of the parasite was excluded in fecal samples.
Participants in the study were 47 cases and their respective controls. Each group included 39 (83%) men and 8 (17%) women. Forty-five cases (95%) and 42 controls (89%) had been born in Safor. Only two cases had travelled to endemic areas. Farming was the main activity in 32 (68%) cases and 31 (66%) controls. The only occupational activity which showed influence on strongyloidiasis was working in ricefields, with an OR of 2.97 (95% CI: 1.16-7.71). Dermatologic symptoms were significant for pruritus, OR 7.39 (95% CI: 2.29-27.60). One case with hyperinfection and another with larva currens were diagnosed.
In our area, working in ricefields and chronic pruritus are associated with chronic strongylodiasis.
PubMed ID
11345610 View in PubMed
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Aleutian disease serology, protein electrophoresis, and pathology of the European mink (Mustela lutreola) from Navarra, Spain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91885
Source
J Zoo Wildl Med. 2008 Sep;39(3):305-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Sánchez-Migallón Guzmán David
Carvajal Ana
García-Marín Juan F
Ferreras María C
Pérez Valentín
Mitchell Mark
Urra Fermín
Ceña Juan C
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-8410, USA.
Source
J Zoo Wildl Med. 2008 Sep;39(3):305-13
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Aleutian Mink Disease - epidemiology - mortality
Aleutian Mink Disease Virus - immunology
Animals
Animals, Wild - microbiology - virology
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Cause of Death
Conservation of Natural Resources
Cross-Sectional Studies
Distemper - epidemiology - mortality
Distemper Virus, Canine
Female
Male
Mink
Mycoses - epidemiology - mortality - veterinary
Seasons
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Spain - epidemiology
Abstract
The European mink, Mustela lutreola, has suffered a dramatic decline in Europe during the 20th century and is one of the most endangered carnivores in the world. The subpopulation of European mink from Navarra, Spain, estimated to number approximately 420, represents approximately two thirds of the total number of mink in Spain. Aleutian Disease Virus (ADV) is a parvovirus with a high degree of variability that can infect a broad range of mustelid hosts. The pathogenesis of this virus in small carnivores is variable and can be influenced by both host factors (e.g., species, American mink genotype, and immune status) and viral strain. A cross-sectional study was conducted during the pre-reproductive period of February-March 2004 and 2005 and the postreproductive period of September-December 2004. Mink were intensively trapped along seven rivers that were representative of the European mink habitat in Navarra. Antibody counter immunoelectrophoresis against ADV was performed on 84 European mink blood samples. All the samples were negative. Protein electrophoresis was performed on 93 plasma samples. Nine of those samples (9.6%) had gamma globulin levels exceeding 20% of the total plasma protein. Complete necropsies were performed on 23 cadavers of European mink collected in the area between 2000 and 2005. Seventeen of the mink (74%) had traumatic and hemorrhagic lesions compatible with vehicular impact injuries. Although there were no histopathologic lesions associated with ADV, this study documents the first description of a naturally occurring canine distemper virus infection in a European mink. In addition, pulmonary adiaspiromycosis in three European mink from Spain was reported.
PubMed ID
18816991 View in PubMed
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An experimental approach to the immuno-modulatory basis of host-parasite local adaptation in tapeworm-infected sticklebacks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284883
Source
Exp Parasitol. 2017 Sep;180:119-132
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Madeleine Hamley
Frederik Franke
Joachim Kurtz
Jörn Peter Scharsack
Source
Exp Parasitol. 2017 Sep;180:119-132
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Biological - immunology
Animals
Cestoda - immunology - pathogenicity
Cestode Infections - epidemiology - immunology - parasitology - veterinary
Disease Resistance
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - immunology - parasitology
Flow Cytometry - veterinary
Germany - epidemiology
Host-Parasite Interactions - immunology
Iceland - epidemiology
Immunomodulation
Leukocytes - cytology - immunology - metabolism
Respiratory Burst
Smegmamorpha - parasitology
Spain - epidemiology
Virulence
Abstract
The evolutionary arms race of hosts and parasites often results in adaptations, which may differ between populations. Investigation of such local adaptation becomes increasingly important to understand dynamics of host-parasite interactions and co-evolution. To this end we performed an infection experiment involving pairs of three-spined sticklebacks and their tapeworm parasite Schistocephalus solidus from three geographically separated origins (Germany, Spain and Iceland) in a fully-crossed design for sympatric and allopatric host/parasite combinations. We hypothesized that local adaptation of the hosts results in differences in parasite resistance with variation in parasite infection rates and leukocyte activation, whereas parasites from different origins might differ in virulence reflected in host exploitation rates (parasite indices) and S. solidus excretory-secretory products (SsESP) involved in immune manipulation. In our experimental infections, sticklebacks from Iceland were more resistant to S. solidus infection compared to Spanish and German sticklebacks. Higher resistance of Icelandic sticklebacks seemed to depend on adaptive immunity, whereas sticklebacks of German origin, which were more heavily afflicted by S. solidus, showed elevated activity of innate immune traits. German S. solidus were less successful in infecting and exploiting allopatric hosts compared to their Icelandic and Spanish conspecifics. Nevertheless, exclusively SsESP from German S. solidus triggered significant in vitro responses of leukocytes from naïve sticklebacks. Interestingly, parasite indices were almost identical across the sympatric combinations. Differences in host resistance and parasite virulence between the origins were most evident in allopatric combinations and were consistent within origin; i.e. Icelandic sticklebacks were more resistant and their S. solidus were more virulent in all allopatric combinations, whereas German sticklebacks were less resistant and their parasites less virulent. Despite such differences between origins, the degree of host exploitation was almost identical in the sympatric host-parasite combinations, suggesting that the local evolutionary arms race of hosts and parasites resulted in an optimal virulence, maximising parasite fitness while avoiding host overexploitation.
PubMed ID
28322743 View in PubMed
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An international contrast of rates of placental abruption: an age-period-cohort analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272271
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(5):e0125246
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cande V Ananth
Katherine M Keyes
Ava Hamilton
Mika Gissler
Chunsen Wu
Shiliang Liu
Miguel Angel Luque-Fernandez
Rolv Skjærven
Michelle A Williams
Minna Tikkanen
Sven Cnattingius
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(5):e0125246
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abruptio Placentae - epidemiology
Age Distribution
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Maternal Age
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Risk factors
Smoking
Spain - epidemiology
Sweden
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Although rare, placental abruption is implicated in disproportionately high rates of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Understanding geographic and temporal variations may provide insights into possible amenable factors of abruption. We examined abruption frequencies by maternal age, delivery year, and maternal birth cohorts over three decades across seven countries.
Women that delivered in the US (n = 863,879; 1979-10), Canada (4 provinces, n = 5,407,463; 1982-11), Sweden (n = 3,266,742; 1978-10), Denmark (n = 1,773,895; 1978-08), Norway (n = 1,780,271, 1978-09), Finland (n = 1,411,867; 1987-10), and Spain (n = 6,151,508; 1999-12) were analyzed. Abruption diagnosis was based on ICD coding. Rates were modeled using Poisson regression within the framework of an age-period-cohort analysis, and multi-level models to examine the contribution of smoking in four countries.
Abruption rates varied across the seven countries (3-10 per 1000), Maternal age showed a consistent J-shaped pattern with increased rates at the extremes of the age distribution. In comparison to births in 2000, births after 2000 in European countries had lower abruption rates; in the US there was an increase in rate up to 2000 and a plateau thereafter. No birth cohort effects were evident. Changes in smoking prevalence partially explained the period effect in the US (P = 0.01) and Sweden (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
26018653 View in PubMed
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The annual cost of dry eye syndrome in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom among patients managed by ophthalmologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168108
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;13(4):263-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
John P Clegg
Julian F Guest
Almut Lehman
Andrew F Smith
Author Affiliation
CATALYST Health Economics Consultants, Northwood, Middlesex, UK.
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;13(4):263-74
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cost of Illness
Dry Eye Syndromes - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Germany - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Health Care Costs - trends
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Ophthalmology - economics
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Spain - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To estimate the annual cost associated with the management of dry eye patients by ophthalmologists in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom (UK) from the perspective of the healthcare systems in the respective countries.
Published epidemiological and healthcare resource use data attributable to dry eye syndrome was supplemented with information obtained from interviewing ophthalmologists in the six countries.
The estimated prevalence of dry eye syndrome among patients reporting to ophthalmologists was less than 0.1% in all six countries. The total annual healthcare cost of 1,000 dry eye syndrome sufferers managed by ophthalmologists ranged from 0.27 million US dollars (95% CI: 0.20 US dollars; 0.38 million US dollars) in France to 1.10 million US dollars (95% CI: 0.70 US dollars; 1.50 million US dollars) in the UK. A large proportion of dry eye patients either self-treat or are managed by their general practitioner. Hence, our analysis reflects the prevalence and costs of those patients severe enough to warrant treatment by an ophthalmologist.
Given the limitations of the available economic evidence and our data sources, dry eye syndrome does not appear to impose a direct burden to the health care expenditure in the countries investigated. However, given that many dry eye sufferers self-treat with over-the-counter artificial tears and other medications, data which our study did not capture, the true societal costs of dry eye syndrome, borne by both patient and government, are likely to be higher.
PubMed ID
16877285 View in PubMed
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Application of real-time PCR to detect Aleutian Mink Disease Virus on environmental farm sources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262977
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2014 Oct 10;173(3-4):355-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-2014
Author
Alberto Prieto
José Manuel Díaz-Cao
Ricardo Fernández-Antonio
Rosario Panadero
Pablo Díaz
Ceferino López
Patrocinio Morrondo
Pablo Díez-Baños
Gonzalo Fernández
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2014 Oct 10;173(3-4):355-9
Date
Oct-10-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aleutian Mink Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Aleutian Mink Disease Virus - genetics - isolation & purification
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Mink
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods - veterinary
Regression Analysis
Spain - epidemiology
Abstract
The Aleutian Mink Virus (AMDV) causes the Aleutian Mink Disease (AMD) or Mink Plasmacytosis, a disease responsible of high economic losses for industry worldwide. Despite there is evidence of the environmental persistence of the virus, there is not literature on the detection of this virus in environmental samples in farms and this fact would have great importance in the control programs of the disease. In order to detect contamination caused by AMDV on farms, several environmental samples were taken and examined using qPCR. 93.9% of samples taken from farms confirmed to be infected tested positive. The virus was also detected on a farm which, despite having no previous positive results, was sharing personnel with an infected farm. All samples taken from AMD-free farms tested negative, including a farm where an eradication procedure by stamping out had been performed during the preceding months. Higher contamination levels were observed in samples from those surfaces in direct contact with animals. These results are the first demonstration of environmental contamination in farms, hitherto suggested by epidemiological evidences, caused by AMDV on surfaces, furniture and equipments inside mink farms. qPCR is an useful tool for evaluating the spread of AMDV into the environment, and it may have important applications within the disease control programs.
PubMed ID
25183237 View in PubMed
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Are severe musculoskeletal injuries associated with symptoms of common mental disorders among male European professional footballers?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281983
Source
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2016 Dec;24(12):3934-3942
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Vincent Gouttebarge
Haruhito Aoki
Jan Ekstrand
Evert A L M Verhagen
Gino M M J Kerkhoffs
Source
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2016 Dec;24(12):3934-3942
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - psychology - surgery
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Feeding Behavior
Finland - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Musculoskeletal System - injuries
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Injuries - epidemiology - psychology - surgery
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Sleep Wake Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Soccer - injuries
Spain - epidemiology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the associations of severe musculoskeletal injuries (joint and muscles) and surgeries with symptoms of common mental disorders (distress, anxiety/depression, sleeping disturbance, adverse alcohol behaviour , smoking, adverse nutrition behaviour) among male European professional footballers.
Cross-sectional analyses were conducted on electronic questionnaires completed by professional footballers recruited from the national players' unions of Finland, France, Norway, Spain or Sweden. The number of severe (time loss of more than 28 days) musculoskeletal injuries (total, joint, muscle) and surgeries during a professional football career was examined through four questions, while symptoms of common mental disorders were evaluated through validated scales.
A total of 540 professional footballers (mean age of 27 years; 54 % playing in the highest leagues) participated in the study. Sixty-eight per cent of the participants had already incurred one or more severe joint injuries and 60 % one or more severe muscle injuries. Prevalence of symptoms of common mental disorders ranged from 3 % for smoking to 37 % for anxiety/depression and 58 % for adverse nutrition behaviour. The number of severe musculoskeletal injuries during a football career was positively correlated with distress, anxiety and sleeping disturbance, while the number of surgeries was correlated with adverse alcohol behaviour and smoking. Professional footballers who had sustained one or more severe musculoskeletal injuries during their career were two to nearly four times more likely to report symptoms of common mental disorders than professional footballers who had not suffered from severe musculoskeletal injuries.
It can be concluded that the number of severe musculoskeletal injuries and surgeries during a career is positively correlated and associated with symptoms of common mental disorders among male European professional footballers. This study emphasises the importance of applying a multidisciplinary approach to the clinical care and support of professional footballers, especially when a player faces lengthy periods without training and competition as a consequence of recurrent severe joint or muscle injuries.
III.
Notes
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