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Coverage and predictors of influenza vaccination among adults living in a large metropolitan area in Spain: a comparison between the immigrant and indigenous populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156483
Source
Vaccine. 2008 Aug 5;26(33):4218-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-5-2008
Author
Rodrigo Jiménez-García
Valentín Hernández-Barrera
Pilar Carrasco-Garrido
Ana Lopez de Andres
Maria Mercedes Esteban y Peña
Angel Gil de Miguel
Author Affiliation
Preventive Medicine and Public Health Teaching and Research Unit, Health Sciences Faculty, Rey Juan Carlos University, Avda de Atenas s/n, Alcorcón 28402 Madrid, Spain. rodrigo.jimenez@urjc.es
Source
Vaccine. 2008 Aug 5;26(33):4218-23
Date
Aug-5-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Guideline Adherence
Health Personnel
Humans
Influenza Vaccines - immunology
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups
Spain
Vaccination - utilization
Abstract
This study sought to evaluate influenza vaccination coverage in Madrid (Spain). Coverages were estimated for vaccine target groups and special attention was placed on the immigrant population. Individual data from 7341 adults included in the Madrid City Health Survey conducted in 2005 was used. Overall influenza vaccination coverage was 24%. Compliance with age-based influenza vaccine guidelines (>or=65 years) was 63.9%, among thoseor=65 years are acceptable and there is no observable difference in vaccine use between immigrants and indigenous subjects. Strategies that have demonstrated their effectiveness in enhancing vaccination coverages should be applied in Madrid.
PubMed ID
18579263 View in PubMed
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Cross-cultural differences in the reporting of global functional capacity: an example in cataract patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50985
Source
Med Care. 1998 Jun;36(6):868-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
J. Alonso
C. Black
J C Norregaard
E. Dunn
T F Andersen
M. Espallargues
P. Bernth-Petersen
G F Anderson
Author Affiliation
Health Services Research Unit, Institut Municipal d'Investigació Mèdica, Barcelona, Spain.
Source
Med Care. 1998 Jun;36(6):868-78
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Bias (epidemiology)
Cataract - ethnology - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Characteristics
Denmark
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba
Multivariate Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods - standards
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Spain
United States
Visual acuity
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Patient-based health status measures have an important role to play in the assessment of health care outcomes. Among these measures, global assessments increasingly have been used, although the understanding of the performance of these indicators and the determinants of patients responses is underdeveloped. In this study, the performance of a single-item global indicator of visual function in cataract patients of four international settings was compared. METHODS: Visual acuity and ocular comorbidity was assessed by patients' ophthalmologist using Snellen-type charts in patients referred for a first cataract surgery in the United States, Manitoba (Canada), Denmark, and Barcelona (Spain). Patients also were interviewed by telephone and asked to report overall trouble with vision on a single-item indicator ("great deal," "moderate," "a little," "none") and to complete the Visual Functioning Index (VF-14), a scale of visual function ranging from 0 (worst function) to 100 (best level of function), along with other questions including the degree the patient was bothered by symptoms as measured by the Cataract Symptom Score (CSS). A total of 1,407 patients completed the clinical examination and the preoperative interview. RESULTS: Distribution of overall trouble with vision varied across the sites, with the proportion of patients reporting a great deal of trouble ranging from 21.7% to 37.9%. In all sites, patients reporting more trouble with vision tended to show a poorer age-adjusted and sex-adjusted visual acuity. The proportion of patients reporting great deal of trouble with vision was higher in the groups with worse visual acuity (P
PubMed ID
9630128 View in PubMed
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Influenza vaccination coverages among children, adults, health care workers and immigrants in Spain: related factors and trends, 2003-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154214
Source
J Infect. 2008 Dec;57(6):472-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Rodrigo Jiménez-García
Valentín Hernández-Barrera
Pilar Carrasco-Garrido
Ana López de Andrés
Napoleón Pérez
Angel Gil de Miguel
Author Affiliation
Preventive Medicine and Public Health Teaching and Research Unit, Rey Juan Carlos University, Avda de Atenas s/n, Alcorcón 28402 Madrid, Spain. rodrigo.jimenez@urjc.es
Source
J Infect. 2008 Dec;57(6):472-80
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Infant
Influenza Vaccines - immunology
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Spain
Vaccination - trends - utilization
Abstract
This study sought to: describe influenza vaccination coverage among Spanish children, adults, health care workers (HCWs), and immigrants according to the 2006 Spanish National Health Survey (NHS); and analyze the time trend for the period 2003-2006.
We analyzed 38,329 questionnaires drawn from the 2006 NHS, covering subjects aged 6 months and over. As the dependent variable, we took the answer to the question, "Did you (or your child) have a 'flu shot in the last campaign?". Independent variables were age group, gender, nationality, occupation (HCWs), and coexistence of chronic conditions.
In 2006, vaccination coverage for the Spanish population was: 22.2% overall; 6.8% for all children; and 19.1% for children with a chronic medical condition. Coverages were: 66.8% among subjects aged >/=65 years; 26.6% among high-risk subjects aged
PubMed ID
19010553 View in PubMed
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International variation in anesthesia care during cataract surgery: results from the International Cataract Surgery Outcomes Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207513
Source
Arch Ophthalmol. 1997 Oct;115(10):1304-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
J C Nørregaard
O D Schein
L. Bellan
C. Black
J. Alonso
P. Bernth-Petersen
E. Dunn
T F Andersen
M. Espallargues
G F Anderson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Arch Ophthalmol. 1997 Oct;115(10):1304-8
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia - economics - methods - standards
Canada
Cataract Extraction
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Denmark
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Monitoring, Intraoperative - methods - standards
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Retrospective Studies
Spain
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
To describe international variation in anesthesia care and monitoring during cataract surgery and to discuss its implications for cost and safety.
A standardized questionnaire was sent to random samples of ophthalmologists in the United States, Canada, and Barcelona, Spain, and to all ophthalmologists in Denmark. The survey was conducted in 1993 and 1994. Certified ophthalmologists who had performed 1 or more cataract extractions in the previous year were eligible for enrollment.
The response rates were 62% in the United States (n=148), 67% in Canada (n=276), 70% in Barcelona (n=89), and 80% in Denmark (n=82). The anesthetic technique for cataract surgery varied significantly between sites (P
PubMed ID
9338678 View in PubMed
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International variation in ophthalmologic management of patients with cataracts. Results from the International Cataract Surgery Outcomes Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72764
Source
Arch Ophthalmol. 1997 Mar;115(3):399-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
J C Norregaard
O D Schein
G F Anderson
J. Alonso
E. Dunn
C. Black
T F Andersen
P. Bernth-Petersen
L. Bellan
M. Espallargues
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Arch Ophthalmol. 1997 Mar;115(3):399-403
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cataract - complications - therapy
Cataract Extraction - methods - statistics & numerical data
Comparative Study
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ophthalmology - statistics & numerical data - trends
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data - trends
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Spain
Treatment Outcome
United States
World Health
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe international variation in the management of patients with cataacts in 4 health care systems and to discuss the potential implications for cost and utilization of services. DESIGN: To characterize current clinical practice on patients with no coexisting medical or ocular conditions, a standardized questionnaire was sent to random samples of ophthalmologists in the United States (response rate, 82.5%), Canada (66.9%), and Barcelona, Spain (70.4%), and to all ophthalmologists in Denmark (80.1%). From the United States, 526 ophthalmologists who performed cataract surgery participated in the study; there were 276 from Canada, 89 from Barcelona, and 82 from Denmark. RESULTS: Although in all 4 sites most surgeons reported that they performed A-scanning, fundus examination, and refraction routinely before surgery, significant crossnational variation was observed in preoperative ophthalmic and medical testing. While preoperative medical tests were virtually unused in Denmark, they were widely used in the other sites. A significantly higher proportion of the surgeons in the United States and Barcelona reported that they performed less than 100 extractions per year compared with surgeons in Canada and Denmark (P
PubMed ID
9076214 View in PubMed
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Patients' acceptance of waiting for cataract surgery: what makes a wait too long?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51028
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1997 Jun;44(11):1603-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
E. Dunn
C. Black
J. Alonso
J C Norregaard
G F Anderson
Author Affiliation
Health Sciences Clinical Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1997 Jun;44(11):1603-10
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cataract Extraction - psychology
Comparative Study
Denmark
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba
National Health Programs
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Spain
Time Factors
Visual acuity
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The patient's perspective about waiting for elective surgery is an important consideration in the management of waiting lists, yet it has received little attention to date. This study was undertaken to assess the acceptability of personal waiting times from the perspective of patients, and to examine waiting time and patient characteristics associated with the perception that a wait for cataract surgery is too long. The international prospective study was conducted in three sites with explicit waiting systems: Manitoba, Canada; Denmark; and Barcelona, Spain. Patients over the age of 50 years were recruited consecutively from ophthalmologists' practices at the time of their enlistment for first-eye cataract surgery. Anticipated waiting time, opinions about personal waiting time, and patients' visual and health characteristics were identified by means of telephone interviews. The 550 patients interviewed at the time of enlistment for surgery anticipated waits varying from
PubMed ID
9178406 View in PubMed
Less detail

Significant differences in the use of healthcare resources of native-born and foreign born in Spain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150073
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:201
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Pilar Carrasco-Garrido
Rodrigo Jiménez-García
Valentin Hernández Barrera
Ana López de Andrés
Angel Gil de Miguel
Author Affiliation
Unit of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Rey Juan Carlos University, Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain. pilar.carrasco@urjc.es
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:201
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Care Surveys
Health Services - utilization
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Socioeconomic Factors
Spain
Abstract
In the last decade, the number of foreign residents in Spain has doubled and it has become one of the countries in the European Union with the highest number of immigrants There is no doubt that the health of the immigrant population has become a relevant subject from the point of view of public healthcare. Our study aimed at describing the potential inequalities in the use of healthcare resources and in the lifestyles of the resident immigrant population of Spain.
Cross-sectional, epidemiological study from the Spanish National Health Survey (NHS) in 2006, from the Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs. We have worked with individualized secondary data, collected in the Spanish National Health Survey carried out in 2006 and 2007 (SNHS-06), from the Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs. The format of the SNHS-06 has been adapted to the requirements of the European project for the carrying out of health surveys.
The economic immigrant population resident in Spain, present diseases that are similar to those of the indigenous population. The immigrant population shows significantly lower values in the consumption of alcohol, tobacco and physical activity (OR = 0.76; CI 95%: 0.65-0.89, they nonetheless perceive their health condition as worse than that reported by the autochthonous population (OR = 1.63, CI 95%: 1.34-1.97). The probability of the immigrant population using emergency services in the last 12 months was significantly greater than that of the autochthonous population (OR = 1.31, CI 95%: 1.12-1.54). This situation repeats itself when analyzing hospitalization data, with values of probability of being hospitalized greater among immigrants (OR = 1.39, CI 95%: 1.07-1.81).
The economic immigrants have better parameters in relation to lifestyles, but they have a poor perception of their health. Despite the fact that immigrant population shows higher percentages of emergency attendance and hospitalization than the indigenous population, with respect to the use of healthcare resources, their usage of healthcare resources such as drugs, influenza vaccinations or visits to the dentist is lower.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19555474 View in PubMed
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Variation in indications for cataract surgery in the United States, Denmark, Canada, and Spain: results from the International Cataract Surgery Outcomes Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50950
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 1998 Oct;82(10):1107-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
J C Norregaard
P. Bernth-Petersen
J. Alonso
E. Dunn
C. Black
T F Andersen
M. Espallargues
L. Bellan
G F Anderson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 1998 Oct;82(10):1107-11
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cataract - physiopathology
Cataract Extraction - standards - utilization
Denmark
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Preoperative Care
Prospective Studies
Self Disclosure
Spain
Treatment Outcome
United States
Vision Disorders - physiopathology
Visual Acuity - physiology
Waiting Lists
Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: International comparisons of clinical practice may help in assessing the magnitude and possible causes of variation in cross national healthcare utilisation. With this aim, the indications for cataract surgery in the United States, Denmark, the province of Manitoba (Canada), and the city of Barcelona (Spain) were compared. METHODS: In a prospective multicentre study, patients scheduled for first eye cataract surgery and aged 50 years or older were enrolled consecutively. From the United States 766 patients were enrolled; from Denmark 291; from Manitoba 152; and from Barcelona 200. Indication for surgery was measured as preoperative visual status of patients enlisted for cataract surgery. Main variables were preoperative visual acuity in operative eye, the VF-14 score (an index of functional impairment in patients with cataract) and ocular comorbidity. RESULTS: Mean visual acuity were 0.23 (USA), 0.17 (Denmark), 0.15 (Manitoba), and 0.07 (Barcelona) (p 0.05). Mean VF-14 scores were 76 (USA), 76 (Denmark), 71 (Manitoba), and 64 (Barcelona) (p
Notes
Comment In: Br J Ophthalmol. 1998 Oct;82(10):1101-29924291
PubMed ID
9924294 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.