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Ablation procedures in Sweden during 2007: results from the Swedish Catheter Ablation Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91377
Source
Europace. 2009 Feb;11(2):152-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Kesek Milos
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. milos.kesek@comhem.se
Source
Europace. 2009 Feb;11(2):152-4
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - surgery
Atrial Fibrillation - surgery
Catheter Ablation - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Germany
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Spain
Sweden
Tachycardia, Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
AIMS: Catheter ablation research is reported extensively. Much less is known about the clinical practice in the field. Study databases and surveys target selected populations. A general registry is needed to evaluate the actual results of routine catheter ablation. We present statistics from the Swedish Catheter Ablation Registry. METHODS AND RESULTS: The registry is a nation-wide database collecting data from all the eight centres serving the country's population of 9.18 million inhabitants. During each ablation procedure, the data are entered into a local database. On demand, the data are transferred to the central data management facility. The central SQL-database presently covers 7018 ablations performed in 5885 patients during 2004-07. In 2007, 2314 ablation procedures [521 for atrial fibrillation (AF)] were performed (252 ablations per million inhabitants and 57 AF procedures per million inhabitants). Mean procedure and fluoroscopy times ranked from 75 and 12 min, respectively, for atrioventricular junction ablation to 224 and 43 min, respectively, for AF ablation. The incidence of complications during 2007 was 1.8%. One death after a procedure for AF was reported, due to a cerebrovascular embolus. CONCLUSION: The report presents prospective-gathered annual data from a nation-wide ablation register with voluntary participation. Several major complications have been reported, but the overall complication rate was low.
Notes
Comment In: Europace. 2009 Feb;11(2):133-419106199
PubMed ID
18984642 View in PubMed
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Abuse and neglect of older persons in seven cities in seven countries in Europe: a cross-sectional community study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121931
Source
Int J Public Health. 2013 Feb;58(1):121-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Jutta Lindert
Juan de Luna
Francisco Torres-Gonzales
Henrique Barros
Elisabeth Ioannidi-Kopolou
Maria Gabriella Melchiorre
Mindaugas Stankunas
Gloria Macassa
Joaquim F J Soares
Author Affiliation
Protestant University of Applied Sciences Ludwigsburg, Ludwigsburg, Germany. mail@jlindert.de
Source
Int J Public Health. 2013 Feb;58(1):121-32
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Elder Abuse - economics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Emigrants and Immigrants - classification
Female
Germany
Greece
Humans
Italy
Lithuania
Logistic Models
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Portugal
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Sex Factors
Social Class
Spain
Sweden
Abstract
We aimed to investigate the prevalence rate of abuse (psychological, physical, sexual, financial, neglect) of older persons (AO) in seven cities from seven countries in Europe (Germany, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Portugal, Spain, Sweden), and to assess factors potentially associated with AO.
A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2009 (n = 4,467, aged 60-84). Potentially associated factors were grouped into domains (domain 1: age, gender, migration history; domain 2: education, occupation; domain 3: marital status, living situation; domain 4: habitation, income, financial strain). We calculated odds ratios (OR) with their respective 95 % confidence intervals (CI).
Psychological AO was the most common form of AO, ranging from 10.4 % (95 % CI 8.1-13.0) in Italy to 29.7 % (95 % CI 26.2-33.5) in Sweden. Second most common form was financial AO, ranging from 1.8 % (95 % CI 0.9-3.2) in Sweden to 7.8 % (95 % CI 5.8-10.1) in Portugal. Less common was physical AO, ranging from 1.0 % (95 % CI 0.4-2.1) in Italy to 4.0 % (95 % CI 2.6-5.8 %) in Sweden. Sexual AO was least common, ranging from 0.3 (95 % CI 0.0-1.1) in Italy and Spain to 1.5 % (95 % CI 0.7-2.8) in Greece. Being from Germany (AOR 3.25, 95 % CI 2.34-4.51), Sweden (OR 3.16, 95 % CI 2.28-4.39) or Lithuania (AOR 2.45, 95 % CI 1.75-3.43) was associated with increased prevalence rates of AO.
Country of residence of older people is independent from the four assessed domains associated with AO. Life course perspectives on AO are highly needed to get better insight, and to develop and implement prevention strategies targeted at decreasing prevalence rates of AO.
PubMed ID
22864651 View in PubMed
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Accounting for structural and exchange mobility in models of status attainment: Social fluidity in five European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294359
Source
Soc Sci Res. 2017 01; 61:112-125
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
01-2017
Author
Jorge Rodríguez Menés
Author Affiliation
Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain. Electronic address: jorge.rodriguez@upf.edu.
Source
Soc Sci Res. 2017 01; 61:112-125
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Children
Denmark
Educational Status
Employment
Father-Child Relations
Fathers
Germany
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Norway
Occupations
Social Class
Spain
Surveys and Questionnaires
United Kingdom
Abstract
This paper proposes a new method to distinguish structural from exchange mobility in status attainment models with interval endogenous variables. In order to measure structural mobility, the paper proposes to trace occupational and educational changes across generations using information provided by children about their fathers. The validity of the method is assessed by comparing the effects of father's socio-economic status and education on son's status and educational attainments, net of occupational upgrading and educational expansion, in five European countries: Britain, Denmark, Germany, Norway, and Spain, using data from the 2005 EU-SILC survey. The results show that the effect of father's on son's ISEI weakens greatly in all countries after considering occupational upgrading, and that much of father's influence over sons occurs by directing them towards occupations with good economic prospects. Useful extensions to the method are discussed in the conclusions.
PubMed ID
27886723 View in PubMed
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Acute effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory admissions: results from APHEA 2 project. Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15434
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2001
Author
R W Atkinson
H R Anderson
J. Sunyer
J. Ayres
M. Baccini
J M Vonk
A. Boumghar
F. Forastiere
B. Forsberg
G. Touloumi
J. Schwartz
K. Katsouyanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, St. George's Hospital Medical School, London, United Kingdom. atkinson@sghms.ac.uk
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Date
Nov-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
England - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Italy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Particle Size
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Population Surveillance
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Spain - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Weather
Abstract
The APHEA 2 project investigated short-term health effects of particles in eight European cities. In each city associations between particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microm (PM(10)) and black smoke and daily counts of emergency hospital admissions for asthma (0-14 and 15-64 yr), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and all-respiratory disease (65+ yr) controlling for environmental factors and temporal patterns were investigated. Summary PM(10) effect estimates (percentage change in mean number of daily admissions per 10 microg/m(3) increase) were asthma (0-14 yr) 1.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 2.3), asthma (15-64 yr) 1.1% (0.3, 1.8), and COPD plus asthma and all-respiratory (65+ yr) 1.0% (0.4, 1.5) and 0.9% (0.6, 1.3). The combined estimates for Black Smoke tended to be smaller and less precisely estimated than for PM(10). Variability in the sizes of the PM(10) effect estimates between cities was also investigated. In the 65+ groups PM(10) estimates were positively associated with annual mean concentrations of ozone in the cities. For asthma admissions (0-14 yr) a number of city-specific factors, including smoking prevalence, explained some of their variability. This study confirms that particle concentrations in European cities are positively associated with increased numbers of admissions for respiratory diseases and that some of the variation in PM(10) effect estimates between cities can be explained by city characteristics.
PubMed ID
11734437 View in PubMed
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Adding formoterol to budesonide in moderate asthma--health economic results from the FACET study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10200
Source
Respir Med. 2001 Jun;95(6):505-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
F. Andersson
E. Stahl
P J Barnes
C G Löfdahl
P M O'Byrne
R A Pauwels
D S Postma
A E Tattersfield
A. Ullman
Author Affiliation
AstraZeneca R&D Lund, Sweden. fredrik.l.andersson@astrazeneca.com
Source
Respir Med. 2001 Jun;95(6):505-12
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - economics
Budesonide - economics - therapeutic use
Cost Savings
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Drug Therapy, Combination
Ethanolamines - economics - therapeutic use
Great Britain
Health Care Costs
Humans
Middle Aged
Normal Distribution
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spain
Sweden
Abstract
The FACET (Formoterol and Corticosteroid Establishing Therapy) study established that there is a clear clinical benefit in adding formoterol to budesonide therapy in patients who have persistent symptoms of asthma despite treatment with low to moderate doses of an inhaled corticosteroid. We combined the clinical results from the FACET study with an expert survey on average resource use in connection with mild and severe asthma exacerbations in the U.K., Sweden and Spain. The primary objective of this study was to assess the health economics of adding the inhaled long-acting beta2-agonist formoterol to the inhaled corticosteroid budesonide in the treatment of asthma. The extra costs of adding the inhaled beta2-agonist formoterol to the corticosteroid budesonide in asthmatic patients in Sweden were offset by savings from reduced use of resources for exacerbations. For Spain the picture was mixed. Adding formoterol to low dose budesonide generated savings, whereas for moderate doses of budesonide about 75% of the extra formoterol costs could be recouped. In the U.K., other savings offset about half of the extra cost of formoterol. All cost-effectiveness ratios are within accepted cost-effectiveness ranges reported from previous studies. If productivity losses were included, there were net savings in all three countries, ranging from Euro 267-1183 per patient per year. In conclusion, adding the inhaled, long-acting beta2-agonist formoterol to low-moderate doses of the inhaled corticosteroid budesonide generated significant gains in all outcome measures with partial or complete offset of costs. Adding formoterol to budesonide can thus be considered to be cost-effective.
PubMed ID
11421509 View in PubMed
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[A descriptive clinical study of a type of arthritis in beekeepers of the Badajoz area of La Siberia Extremeña]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14332
Source
Med Clin (Barc). 1995 Jul 1;105(5):164-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1995
Author
J. Peña
J M Salazar
R. Ortega
J L Alvarez
J E Campillo
M D Torres
Author Affiliation
Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad de Medicina, Hospital Infanta Cristina, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz.
Source
Med Clin (Barc). 1995 Jul 1;105(5):164-7
Date
Jul-1-1995
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Arthritis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Bees
Chronic Disease
Diagnosis, Differential
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Insect Bites and Stings - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Random Allocation
Spain - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The appearance of episodes of arthritis has been detected in beekeepers in the Siberia Extremadura (Spain) related to working with the hives. This present work describes the clinical features of such arthritic syndrome. METHODS: Sixty cases were selected at random from a previous epidemiological study to undergo a clinical protocol that included, anamnesis, physical signs, haematological, biochemical and immunological analyses, and radiological exploration of hands, wrists, feet, and pelvis. RESULTS: The picture is characterized by episodes of oligoarthritis associated with bee-stings in the affected joints or nearby. The most frequent radiologic lesions are pinched articular lines, sclerosis, and the presence of geodes. Analytically, there was frequent eosinophilia, abnormalities in haemostasis tests, and a rise in serum alkaline phosphatase. CONCLUSIONS: An acute inflammatory oligoarthritis of unknown cause has been described which affects the hands asymmetrically, and which is found in beekeepers in relation to their work with the hives. It occasionally involves into a chronic localized arthropathy capable of provoking ankylosis and permanent articular disability.
PubMed ID
7630227 View in PubMed
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[Adherence to international recommendations in the fight against antimicrobial resistance - Substantial difference between outpatient consumption in Spain and Denmark].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278374
Source
Rev Esp Quimioter. 2016 Feb;29(1):40-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Sara Malo
María José Rabanaque
Lars Bjerrum
Source
Rev Esp Quimioter. 2016 Feb;29(1):40-3
Date
Feb-2016
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Cephalosporins
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Drug Utilization
Fluoroquinolones
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Macrolides
Outpatients
Spain - epidemiology
Abstract
Increasing antibiotic resistance represents a major public health threat that jeopardises the future treatment of bacterial infections. This study aims to describe the adherence to recommendations proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO) Advisory Group on Integrated Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance (AGISAR), in Spain and Denmark, and to analyse the relation between the outpatient use of Critically Important Antimicrobials (CIA) and the bacterial resistance rates to these agents.
The Antimicrobial consumption interactive database (ESAC-Net) and Antimicrobial resistance interactive database (EARS-Net) provided data on outpatient use (2010-2013) of CIA (fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and 3rd and 4th generation cephalosporins) and the percentages of isolates of the main pathogens causing serious infections, resistant to these agents.
The use of cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones, as well as the percentage of bacteria resistant, is higher in Spain than in Denmark. Although consumption of macrolides in both countries is similar, the proportion of Streptococcus pneumoniae resistant to macrolides is significantly higher in Spain.
The high outpatient consumption of CIA agents in Spain deviates substantially from the WHO recommendations. Moreover, it has the effect of elevated rates of antimicrobial resistance, that are lower in Denmark.
PubMed ID
26809795 View in PubMed
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Ageing with telecare: care or coercion in austerity?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256617
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2013 Jul;35(6):799-812
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Maggie Mort
Celia Roberts
Blanca Callén
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Lancaster University, UK Fundación Española para la Ciencia y la Tecnología, Barcelona, Spain.
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2013 Jul;35(6):799-812
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Aged
Aging - psychology
Coercion
Consumer Participation
Economic Recession
Geriatric Nursing - methods - standards
Health Services Misuse - prevention & control
Humans
Netherlands
Norway
Organizational Innovation
Professional-Patient Relations - ethics
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care
Spain
Telemedicine - instrumentation - standards - utilization
Abstract
In recent years images of independence, active ageing and staying at home have come to characterise a successful old age in western societies. 'Telecare' technologies are heavily promoted to assist ageing-in-place and a nexus of demographic ageing, shrinking healthcare and social care budgets and technological ambition has come to promote the 'telehome' as the solution to the problem of the 'age dependency ratio'. Through the adoption of a range of monitoring and telecare devices, it seems that the normative vision of independence will also be achieved. But with falling incomes and pressure for economies of scale, what kind of independence is experienced in the telehome? In this article we engage with the concepts of 'technogenarians' and 'shared work' to illuminate our analysis of telecare in use. Drawing on European-funded research we argue that home-monitoring based telecare has the potential to coerce older people unless we are able to recognise and respect a range of responses including non-use and 'misuse' in daily practice. We propose that re-imagining the aims of telecare and redesigning systems to allow for creative engagement with technologies and the co-production of care relations would help to avoid the application of coercive forms of care technology in times of austerity.
PubMed ID
23094945 View in PubMed
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[Age of menopause onset in Canary Islands women]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35822
Source
Rev Sanid Hig Publica (Madr). 1994 May-Jun;68(3):385-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Sosa Henríquez
M C Navarro Rodríguez
J M Limiñana Cañal
A. Wagner Fahlin
J M Guerra Ramos
A R Nicholas
P. López Prado
D. Hernández Hernández
Author Affiliation
Departamento de Enfermería (Ciclo Salud-Enfermedad), Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud.
Source
Rev Sanid Hig Publica (Madr). 1994 May-Jun;68(3):385-91
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Atlantic Islands
Child
Comparative Study
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Germany
Great Britain
Humans
Japan
Menarche
Menopause
Middle Aged
Parity
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
South Africa
Spain
United States
Urban Population
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To establish the age at menopause in the Canary woman. To study the possible influence of habitat, socioeconomical status and other possible factors on it. METHODS: From an initial population of 742 women, we previously excluded those that were not menopausal at the moment of the study and those that suffered it as a result of a oophorectomy. We included 394 women that had a natural menopause in the study group. RESULTS: The mean age of menopause was 48.6 years old. There were no statistical differences between the natural or urban areas. Neither the age of menarche nor the number of pregnancies had any influence on the age of menopause. Women with high socioeconomical status had the menopause later (50.7 years old) than hose with medium or low socioeconomical status (48.6 and 48.4 years old respectively). DISCUSSION: Comparing the age of menopause found in our study (48.6 years) with the published in other papers, this is very similar to the age mean reported in other spanish studies but a little lower than the age of menopause established in some occidental countries.
PubMed ID
7716428 View in PubMed
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Age standardisation of drug utilisation: comparisons of different methods using cardiovascular drug data from Sweden and Spain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35992
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1994;46(5):393-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
J. Merlo
J. Ranstam
L. Råstam
A. Wessling
A. Melander
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Lund University, Malmö General Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1994;46(5):393-8
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents
Cardiovascular Agents
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Diuretics
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Reference Standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spain
Sweden
Abstract
In drug utilisation studies, the units of defined daily doses (DDD) and DDD/1000 inhabitants per day standardise for differences in dosage and population size, but not for age-related differences in drug utilisation. There is no consensus as to how age standardisation of DDD data should be carried out. Using cardiovascular drug utilisation data from Sweden and Spain, the current study compared the outcome of different methods of age standardisation. Both indirect methods (based on a comparison of observed and expected drug usage) and direct methods (using different weighting for the age categories) were used. The largest impact of standardisation was seen for diuretics. The crude rate for men and women combined was 26 DDD/1000 inhabitants per day in Costa de Ponent and 98 DDD/1000 inhabitants per day in Värmland. The corresponding figures when standardising the Costa de Ponent population were 26 and 58, respectively. Using the equivalent average rate (EAR) method, the rate for Värmland was 129 DDD/1000 inhabitants per day. Lesser but still important differences were found for beta-adrenoceptor and antihypertensives. Thus, the results of standardisation differ depending on which method is used and which drugs are evaluated. EAR is recommended for direct standardisation because of its ease of use and because it does not require the choice of a standard population.
PubMed ID
7957531 View in PubMed
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565 records – page 1 of 57.