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The effect of occupational noise exposure on tinnitus and sound-induced auditory fatigue among obstetrics personnel: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267920
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(3):e005793
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sofie Fredriksson
Oscar Hammar
Kjell Torén
Artur Tenenbaum
Kerstin Persson Waye
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(3):e005793
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Auditory Fatigue - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Obstetrics
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sound - adverse effects
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Tinnitus - etiology
Abstract
There is a lack of research on effects of occupational noise exposure in traditionally female-dominated workplaces. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess risk of noise-induced hearing-related symptoms among obstetrics personnel.
A cross-sectional study was performed at an obstetric ward in Sweden including a questionnaire among all employees and sound level measurements in 61 work shifts at the same ward.
115 female employees responded to a questionnaire (72% of all 160 employees invited).
Self-reported hearing-related symptoms in relation to calculated occupational noise exposure dose and measured sound levels.
Sound levels exceeded the 80 dB LAeq limit for protection of hearing in 46% of the measured work shifts. One or more hearing-related symptoms were reported by 55% of the personnel. In logistic regression models, a significant association was found between occupational noise exposure dose and tinnitus (OR=1.04, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.09) and sound-induced auditory fatigue (OR=1.04, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.07). Work-related stress and noise annoyance at work were reported by almost half of the personnel. Sound-induced auditory fatigue was associated with work-related stress and noise annoyance at work, although stress slightly missed significance in a multivariable model. No significant interactions were found.
This study presents new results showing that obstetrics personnel are at risk of noise-induced hearing-related symptoms. Current exposure levels at the workplace are high and occupational noise exposure dose has significant effects on tinnitus and sound-induced auditory fatigue among the personnel. These results indicate that preventative action regarding noise exposure is required in obstetrics care and that risk assessments may be needed in previously unstudied non-industrial communication-intense sound environments.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25818267 View in PubMed
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Potential Welfare Impacts of Chase and Capture of Small Cetaceans during Drive Hunts in Japan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309630
Source
J Appl Anim Welf Sci. 2020 Apr-Jun; 23(2):193-208
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Courtney S Vail
Diana Reiss
Philippa Brakes
Andrew Butterworth
Author Affiliation
Lightkeepers, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
Source
J Appl Anim Welf Sci. 2020 Apr-Jun; 23(2):193-208
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animal Welfare
Animals
Dolphins - injuries - physiology - psychology
Japan
Sound - adverse effects
Stress, Physiological
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
Drive hunts are a method to herd, capture and kill small cetaceans (whales and dolphins) in coastal waters of some countries including Japan and the Faroe Islands. In Japan, these methods are often associated with the acquisition of live dolphins for international marine parks and aquaria. During the hunts, dolphins are herded by a flotilla of fishing vessels and loud underwater noise created by fishermen banging hammers on metal poles. The prolonged and strenuous chase and use of sound barriers to herd, capture, and restrain the dolphins can result in acute stress and injury. The authors review physiological and behavioral data pertaining to chase, encirclement, and live capture of dolphins and draw comparisons between chase and capture data for marine and terrestrial species. This analysis raises substantial welfare concerns associated with the hunts and acquisition of dolphins from such capture operations. The authors assert that this data detailing the negative impacts of chase, herding and handling (capture) of small cetaceans renders these hunts inherently inhumane and should inform policy relating to the collection and management of dolphins in the wild.
PubMed ID
30806084 View in PubMed
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Sound exposure among the Finnish National Opera personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186753
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 2003 Mar;18(3):177-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Heli M Laitinen
Esko M Toppila
Pekka S Olkinuora
Kaarina Kuisma
Author Affiliation
Department of Physics, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 2003 Mar;18(3):177-82
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Humans
Music
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Sound - adverse effects
Tinnitus - etiology
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to determine how and when the personnel of the Finnish National Opera are exposed to noise and whether exposure depends on musical selection of repertoire. Additionally, an evaluation of sound exposure level due to individual rehearsals was included. The measurements were done using individual noise dosimeters and fixed-point measurements. From the measurements, annual noise exposure in the Opera was evaluated. The conductors, dancers, and double bass players were exposed to levels below 85 decibels, A-weighted, dB(A), which is the national action level. The choir members were exposed to sound levels of 92 and 94 dB(A). Within the orchestra, the highest sound exposure levels were found among percussionists, 95 dB(A); flute/piccolo players, 95 dB(A); and brass players, 92-94 dB(A). Other sound exposure levels among orchestra members varied from 83 to 89 dB(A). Soloists and rehearsal pianists are likely to be exposed to sound levels exceeding the national action level. From an exposure perspective, the individual rehearsals, 79-100 dB(A), proved to be as important as performances and group rehearsals, 82-99 dB(A), among orchestra musicians and choir singers. The ambient sound level for the lighting crew was 76 +/- 4 dB(A). However, the measured sound levels at the ear varied from 77 to 92 dB(A) due to the communication via headphones that had individual volume control. For the majority of personnel of the Finnish National Opera, sound exposure level exceeded the national action level value of 85 dB(A). Artists exceeded the action level during both individual and group rehearsals, as well as during performances. Hearing protection has been designed for musicians. Education/reinforcement is required to ensure it is worn.
PubMed ID
12573963 View in PubMed
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