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[1998 Quebec Social and Health Survey: determinants of chronic respiratory diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193733
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 May-Jun;92(3):228-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Lévesque
P. Lajoie
M. Rhainds
T. Kosatsky
A M Grenier
P. Ernst
N. Audet
Author Affiliation
Direction régionale de santé publique de Québec, 2400, d'Estimauville, Beauport, Québec, G1E 7G9. benoît.lévesque@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 May-Jun;92(3):228-32
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications
Bronchitis - complications
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Emphysema - complications
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking - adverse effects
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
In the course of the "1998 Health and Social Survey", questions were included to verify the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases and also of wheezing. The objectives of this study were 1) to verify the prevalence of wheezing and its validity as an indicator of chronic respiratory diseases in Québec; and 2) to examine the relationship between chronic respiratory diseases and some of their potential determinants. A total of 30,386 individuals participated in the study. For all ages, the prevalence of wheezing was 5.4%. It was associated with asthma, allergies, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. A low familial income and tobacco smoking were associated with wheezing, asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Passive smoking was associated with wheezing whereas the presence of carpets was associated with wheezing and asthma. Between 32 and 48% of families with an asthmatic or an allergic member modified their dwelling to alleviate respiratory problems. The prevalence of wheezing documented here was lower than in anglosaxon countries. This result could be explained by a cultural factor (the French translation or the perception of wheezing). This study emphasizes the role of reducing tobacco smoking in the prevention of chronic respiratory diseases.
PubMed ID
11496637 View in PubMed
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Acceptable noise level (ANL) with Danish and non-semantic speech materials in adult hearing-aid users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123124
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Sep;51(9):678-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Steen Østergaard Olsen
Johannes Lantz
Lars Holme Nielsen
K Jonas Brännström
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Research Laboratory, University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. steen.olsen@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Sep;51(9):678-88
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Audiometry, Speech
Auditory Threshold
Correction of Hearing Impairment
Denmark
Female
Hearing Aids
Hearing Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise - adverse effects
Patient satisfaction
Perceptual Masking
Persons With Hearing Impairments - psychology - rehabilitation
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Semantics
Sound Spectrography
Speech Perception
Abstract
The acceptable noise level (ANL) test is used for quantification of the amount of background noise subjects accept when listening to speech. This study investigates Danish hearing-aid users' ANL performance using Danish and non-semantic speech signals, the repeatability of ANL, and the association between ANL and outcome of the international outcome inventory for hearing aids (IOI-HA).
ANL was measured in three conditions in both ears at two test sessions. Subjects completed the IOI-HA and the ANL questionnaire.
Sixty-three Danish hearing-aid users; fifty-seven subjects were full time users and 6 were part time/non users of hearing aids according to the ANL questionnaire.
ANLs were similar to results with American English speech material. The coefficient of repeatability (CR) was 6.5-8.8 dB. IOI-HA scores were not associated to ANL.
Danish and non-semantic ANL versions yield results similar to the American English version. The magnitude of the CR indicates that ANL with Danish and non-semantic speech materials is not suitable for prediction of individual patterns of future hearing-aid use or evaluation of individual benefit from hearing-aid features. The ANL with Danish and non-semantic speech materials is not related to IOI-HA outcome.
PubMed ID
22731922 View in PubMed
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Acoustically invisible feeding blue whales in Northern Icelandic waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267088
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2014 Aug;136(2):939-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Tomonari Akamatsu
Marianne Helene Rasmussen
Maria Iversen
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2014 Aug;136(2):939-44
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustics - instrumentation
Animals
Balaenoptera - physiology - psychology
Equipment Design
Feeding Behavior
Iceland
Oceans and Seas
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Sound Spectrography
Time Factors
Transducers, Pressure
Vocalization, Animal
Abstract
Fixed passive acoustic monitoring can be used for long-term recording of vocalizing cetaceans. Both presence monitoring and animal density estimation requires the call rates and sound source levels of vocalizations produced by single animals. In this study, blue whale calls were recorded using acoustic bio-logging systems in Skjálfandi Bay off Húsavík, Northeast Iceland, in June 2012. An accelerometer was attached to individual whales to monitor diving behavior. During 21?h recording two individuals, 8?h 45?min and 13?h 2?min, respectively, 105 and 104 lunge feeding events and four calls were recorded. All recorded calls were down-sweep calls ranging from 105 to 48?Hz. The sound duration was 1-2?s. The source level was estimated to be between 158 and 169?dB re 1µPa rms, assuming spherical sound propagation from the possible sound source location to the tag. The observed sound production rates and source levels of individual blue whales during feeding were extremely small compared with those observed previously in breeding grounds. The feeding whales were nearly acoustically invisible. The function of calls during feeding remains unknown.
PubMed ID
25096128 View in PubMed
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Acoustic and perceptual evaluation of voice and speech quality: a study of patients with laryngeal cancer treated with laryngectomy vs irradiation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21227
Source
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1999 Feb;125(2):157-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
C. Finizia
H. Dotevall
E. Lundström
J. Lindström
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. Caterina.Finizia@orlss.gu.se
Source
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1999 Feb;125(2):157-63
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Laryngeal Neoplasms - radiotherapy - surgery
Laryngectomy
Larynx - radiation effects
Larynx, Artificial
Male
Middle Aged
Radiation Injuries - diagnosis - physiopathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Salvage Therapy
Sound Spectrography
Speech Intelligibility - physiology
Speech Production Measurement
Speech, Esophageal
Voice Quality - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare voice and speech function in patients who underwent laryngectomy with that of 2 control groups. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study comparing acoustic and temporal variables with perceptual evaluations in 3 subject groups. SETTING: University hospital in Göteborg, Sweden. SUBJECTS: Two groups of patients with laryngeal carcinoma were examined: 12 male patients who had laryngectomy and were using a tracheoesophageal prosthesis and 12 male patients treated with radical radiotherapy who had a preserved larynx. The third group consisted of 10 normal controls without laryngeal disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Acoustic variables were fundamental frequency, absolute fundamental frequency perturbation, speech rate, and maximum phonation time. Perceptual evaluation included 15 listeners' perceptual evaluation and the patients' self-assessment of speech intelligibility, voice quality, and speech acceptability. RESULTS: No significant acoustic or temporal differences were found between the laryngectomy and radical radiotherapy groups. There was a significant difference between the patient groups in perceptual evaluation. Both groups of patients differed from normal controls in acoustic and temporal measures, where the laryngectomy group generally deviated more from the normal controls than the patient group treated with radiotherapy. There was a weak, but significant, correlation between absolute fundamental frequency perturbation and perceived voice quality. CONCLUSIONS: Perceptual evaluations could indicate significant differences between the patients who underwent laryngectomy and irradiated patients, where the acoustic analysis failed to reflect these differences. Both patient groups could be distinguished according to acoustic and temporal measures when compared with normal controls. The acoustic analyses were more sufficient in voices without severe dysfunction.
PubMed ID
10037282 View in PubMed
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Acoustic measures and self-reports of vocal fatigue by female teachers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166317
Source
J Voice. 2008 May;22(3):283-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Anne-Maria Laukkanen
Irma Ilomäki
Kirsti Leppänen
Erkki Vilkman
Author Affiliation
Department of Speech Communication and Voice Research, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. Anne-Maria.Laukkanen@uta.fi
Source
J Voice. 2008 May;22(3):283-9
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis
Phonation
Phonetics
Sound Spectrography
Speech Acoustics
Teaching
Voice Disorders - diagnosis
Voice Quality
Abstract
This study investigated the relation of symptoms of vocal fatigue to acoustic variables reflecting type of voice production and the effects of vocal loading. Seventy-nine female primary school teachers volunteered as subjects. Before and after a working day, (1) a 1-minute text reading sample was recorded at habitual loudness and loudly (as in large classroom), (2) a prolonged phonation on [a:] was recorded at habitual speaking pitch and loudness, and (3) a questionnaire about voice quality, ease, or difficulty of phonation and tiredness of throat was completed. The samples were analyzed for average fundamental frequency (F0), sound pressure level (SPL), and phonation type reflecting alpha ratio (SPL [1-5 kHz]-SPL [50 Hz-1 kHz]). The vowel samples were additionally analyzed for perturbation (jitter and shimmer). After a working day, F0, SPL, and alpha ratio were higher, jitter and shimmer values were lower, and more tiredness of throat was reported. The average levels of the acoustic parameters did not correlate with the symptoms. Increase in jitter and mean F0 in loud reading correlated with tiredness of throat. The results seem to suggest that, at least among experienced vocal professionals, voice production type had little relevance from the point of view of vocal fatigue reported. Differences in the acoustic parameters after a vocally loading working day mainly seem to reflect increased muscle activity as a consequence of vocal loading.
PubMed ID
17134877 View in PubMed
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Acoustic signal and noise changes in the Beaufort Sea Pacific Water duct under anticipated future acidification of Arctic Ocean waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301804
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2017 10; 142(4):1926
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
10-2017
Author
Timothy F Duda
Author Affiliation
Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543, USA.
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2017 10; 142(4):1926
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Acoustics
Arctic Regions
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Models, Theoretical
Pacific Ocean
Seawater - chemistry
Sound Spectrography
Abstract
It is predicted that Arctic Ocean acidity will increase during the next century as a result of carbon dioxide accumulation in the atmosphere and migration into ocean waters. This change has implications for sound transmission because low-pH seawater absorbs less sound than high-pH water. Altered pH will affect sound in the 0.3-10?kHz range if the criterion is met that absorption is the primary cause of attenuation, rather than the alternatives of loss in the ice or seabed. Recent work has exploited sound that meets the criterion, sound trapped in a Beaufort Sea duct composed of Pacific Winter Water underlying Pacific Summer Water. Arctic pH is expected to drop from 8.1 to 7.9 (approximately) over the next 30-50?yr, and effects of this chemical alteration on the intensity levels of this ducted sound, and on noise, are examined here. Sound near 900?Hz is predicted to undergo the greatest change, traveling up to 38% further. At ranges of 100-300?km, sound levels from a source in the duct may increase by 7?dB or more. Noise would also increase, but noise is ducted less efficiently, with the result that 1?kHz noise is predicted to rise approximately 0.5?dB.
PubMed ID
29092580 View in PubMed
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Acoustic vector sensor beamforming reduces masking from underwater industrial noise during passive monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289559
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 04; 139(4):EL105
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2016
Author
Aaron M Thode
Katherine H Kim
Robert G Norman
Susanna B Blackwell
Charles R Greene
Author Affiliation
Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, California 92093-0205, USA athode@ucsd.edu.
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 04; 139(4):EL105
Date
04-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acoustics - instrumentation
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - instrumentation - methods
Equipment Design
Models, Theoretical
Motion
Noise - adverse effects
Oceans and Seas
Oil and Gas Industry
Pressure
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Sound Spectrography
Time Factors
Transducers, Pressure
Vocalization, Animal
Water
Abstract
Masking from industrial noise can hamper the ability to detect marine mammal sounds near industrial operations, whenever conventional (pressure sensor) hydrophones are used for passive acoustic monitoring. Using data collected from an autonomous recorder with directional capabilities (Directional Autonomous Seafloor Acoustic Recorder), deployed 4.1?km from an arctic drilling site in 2012, the authors demonstrate how conventional beamforming on an acoustic vector sensor can be used to suppress noise arriving from a narrow sector of geographic azimuths. Improvements in signal-to-noise ratio of up to 15?dB are demonstrated on bowhead whale calls, which were otherwise undetectable using conventional hydrophones.
PubMed ID
27106345 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acoustic vector sensor beamforming reduces masking from underwater industrial noise during passive monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289717
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 04; 139(4):EL105
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2016
Author
Aaron M Thode
Katherine H Kim
Robert G Norman
Susanna B Blackwell
Charles R Greene
Author Affiliation
Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, California 92093-0205, USA athode@ucsd.edu.
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 04; 139(4):EL105
Date
04-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acoustics - instrumentation
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - instrumentation - methods
Equipment Design
Models, Theoretical
Motion
Noise - adverse effects
Oceans and Seas
Oil and Gas Industry
Pressure
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Sound Spectrography
Time Factors
Transducers, Pressure
Vocalization, Animal
Water
Abstract
Masking from industrial noise can hamper the ability to detect marine mammal sounds near industrial operations, whenever conventional (pressure sensor) hydrophones are used for passive acoustic monitoring. Using data collected from an autonomous recorder with directional capabilities (Directional Autonomous Seafloor Acoustic Recorder), deployed 4.1?km from an arctic drilling site in 2012, the authors demonstrate how conventional beamforming on an acoustic vector sensor can be used to suppress noise arriving from a narrow sector of geographic azimuths. Improvements in signal-to-noise ratio of up to 15?dB are demonstrated on bowhead whale calls, which were otherwise undetectable using conventional hydrophones.
PubMed ID
27106345 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adenoidectomy during early life and the risk of asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182650
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2003 Oct;14(5):358-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Petri S Mattila
Sari Hammarén-Malmi
Jussi Tarkkanen
Harri Saxen
Janne Pitkäniemi
Marjatta Karvonen
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. petri.mattila@hus.fi
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2003 Oct;14(5):358-62
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoidectomy
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - epidemiology - etiology
Bronchitis - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child Welfare
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - surgery
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Otitis Media with Effusion - epidemiology - surgery
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Respiratory Sounds
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The objective of the study was to evaluate the risk of asthma in children who had undergone an adenoidectomy, an operation frequently performed on children with glue ear or recurrent otitis media. Two surveys were carried out, a nation-wide questionnaire returned by 483 individuals (survey A) and a survey of hospital discharge records involving 1616 children who had undergone an adenoidectomy and 161 control children who had undergone probing of the nasolacrimal duct due to congenital obstruction (survey B). The questionnaire (survey A) showed that an adenoidectomy before the age of 4 years was associated with asthma (OR 3.19, 95% CI 1.25; 8.13) and with allergy to animal dust (OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.27; 4.95). In survey B, asthma diagnosis was retrieved from the national asthma register. It showed also that adenoidectomy at an early age was associated with an increased risk of asthma (OR 6.74, 95% CI 2.99; 15.2). There was an association between asthma and adenoidectomy, even before adenoidectomy had actually been performed. The risk of asthma was highest among children who had had adenoidectomy because of recurrent otitis media. The observed association between an adenoidectomy and asthma may be explained by an underlying factor predisposing to both recurrent otitis media and asthma.
PubMed ID
14641605 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with wheeze have increased risk of additional health problems. The Young-HUNT study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80130
Source
Prev Med. 2007 Feb;44(2):178-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Tollefsen Elin
Langhammer Arnulf
Bjermer Leif
Kurtze Nanna
Holmen Turid L
Author Affiliation
Trondheim University Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Trondheim, Norway. elin.tollefsen@ntnu.no
Source
Prev Med. 2007 Feb;44(2):178-82
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Female
Headache - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Neck Pain - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds - physiopathology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To explore the hypothesis of an association between current wheeze and other health problems in adolescence and to investigate any sex differences. METHODS: N=8817 adolescents aged 13-19 years completed a self-administered questionnaire including questions on health and lifestyle in Norway (1995-1997). RESULTS: All subjective health problems were significantly more prevalent in current wheezers compared to non-wheezers (frequent headache: girls 18% vs. 9%, boys 8% vs. 3%; frequent neck and shoulder pain: girls 10% vs. 5%, boys 6% vs. 2%; frequent joint and muscle pain: girls 6% vs. 2%, boys 6% vs. 2%; and frequent abdominal pain: girls 10% vs. 3%, boys 3% vs.1%). In both sexes, adjusted for covariates, current wheezers had statistically significant increased risk of reporting frequent headache (girls OR=2.0, boys OR=2.9), frequent neck and shoulder pain (girls OR=1.9, boys OR=3.3), frequent joint and muscle pain (girls OR=2.7, boys OR=3.5) and frequent abdominal pain (girls OR=2.7, boys OR=2.0). CONCLUSIONS: Current adolescent wheezers reported more additional health problems compared to non-wheezers. Even if girls reported more symptoms in general, the associations were stronger in boys. The findings are important for the clinical approach to teenage wheezers and should increase doctors' awareness of coexistence of other health complaints in these patients.
PubMed ID
17055041 View in PubMed
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383 records – page 1 of 39.