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[All preschool children in Sweden need vitamin D fortified food. Dark-skinned children need vitamin D supplementation also after the age of 2].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99913
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Oct 13-19;107(41):2471-3
Publication Type
Article

An examination of cancer risk beliefs among adults from Toronto's Somali, Chinese, Russian and Spanish-speaking communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190520
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Mar-Apr;93(2):138-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Judy A Paisley
Jess Haines
Marlene Greenberg
Mary-Jo Makarchuk
Sarah Vogelzang
Krystyna Lewicki
Author Affiliation
School of Nutrition, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3. j2paisle@ryerson.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Mar-Apr;93(2):138-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
China - ethnology
Culture
Disease Susceptibility - ethnology
Female
Food Supply - standards
Health education
Hispanic Americans
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology - psychology
Ontario
Risk factors
Russia - ethnology
Somalia - ethnology
Spain - ethnology
Abstract
Canada's growing ethnocultural diversity challenges health professionals to develop culturally sensitive cancer prevention strategies. Little is known about the ethnocultural specificity of cancer risk beliefs. This qualitative pilot study examined cancer risk beliefs, focusing on diet, among adults from Toronto's Somali, Chinese, Russian, and Spanish-speaking communities.
Group interviews (n = 4) were conducted with convenience samples of adults (total n = 45) from four ethnocultural communities (total 45 participants).
The constant comparison method of data analysis identified three common themes: knowledge of cancer risk factors, concern about the food supply, and the roles of spiritual and emotional well-being. Two areas of contrasting belief concerning specific mediators of cancer risk were identified.
Findings support the investigation of cultural-specific health promotion strategies emphasizing both the maintenance of traditional cancer protective eating practices and the adoption of additional healthy eating practices among new Canadians. More research is needed to enhance our understanding of ethnoculturally specific cancer risk beliefs and practices to ensure the cultural relevance of programming.
PubMed ID
11963519 View in PubMed
Less detail

An exploration of the connection between two meaning perspectives: an evidence-based approach to health information delivery to vulnerable groups of Arabic- and Somali-speaking asylum seekers in a Swedish context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259553
Source
Glob Health Promot. 2012 Sep;19(3):21-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Solvig Ekblad
Andrea Linander
Maria Asplund
Source
Glob Health Promot. 2012 Sep;19(3):21-31
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Evidence-Based Practice
Female
Health Information Management
Health promotion
Humans
Information Dissemination
Male
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Refugees
Somalia - ethnology
Sweden
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
The right to health care is significant for asylum seekers, particularly as many of them have experienced traumatic life events in their home country, during flight or in their host country. Post-migration living conditions have more impact than pre-migration conditions on ill health among asylum seekers, which underscores the importance of health care-related refugee reception policies. The purpose of this article is to explore the perceived meaning of comprehensive health information provided by a nurse to Arabic- and Somali-speaking adult asylum seekers, in a Swedish context, during its introduction at the Migration Board. In our study, the endpoint was whether asylum seekers found such health information relevant, understandable and respectful. Following an oral presentation, participants filled in a questionnaire consisting of three close-ended questions. A total of 39 groups of presentation attendees included 626 asylum seekers (415 Arabic- and 211 Somali-speaking). Data were analysed with descriptive statistics. Comments underwent content analysis. We also present some socio-demographic data on these asylum seekers. Independently of gender and language, the participants expressed their gratitude for and the meaningfulness of receiving professional, fact-based information, as well as being treated with concern and respect. They indicated a great need for this and felt relieved by being listened to. They liked the pedagogic group method, the opportunity for dialogue and to practice exercising their rights. These promising results indicate that exercising the asylum-seekers' right to receive such health information would improve future reception policies not only in Sweden, but throughout the EU. A renewed focus on communication and pedagogic skills, instead of just cultural training, should be considered for health care professionals assisting asylum seekers.
PubMed ID
24802781 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between anthropometric measures and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is different in Russian, Somali and Kurdish origin migrants compared with the general population in Finland: a cross-sectional population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300271
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Apr 11; 19(1):391
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-11-2019
Author
Natalia Skogberg
Tiina Laatikainen
Eero Lilja
Annamari Lundqvist
Tommi Härkänen
Päivikki Koponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Welfare, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Mannerheimintie 166, PL 30, 00271, Helsinki, Finland. natalia.skogberg@thl.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Apr 11; 19(1):391
Date
Apr-11-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - ethnology
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Russia - ethnology
Somalia - ethnology
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Waist Circumference
Waist-Height Ratio
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Persons of African and Middle-Eastern origin living in European countries have a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes, accompanied by high prevalence of obesity among women but not always among men. The aim of this study was to examine whether there are differences in the association between anthropometric measures and glucose levels measured with glycated haemoglobin and fasting blood glucose among persons of migrant origin in Finland.
Cross-sectional population-based data of the 30-64?year-old participants in the health examination of the Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study was used, selecting persons without diabetes (Russian origin n =?293, Somali origin n =?184, Kurdish origin n =?275). The reference group were non-diabetic participants in the Health 2011 Survey (n =?653), representative of the general Finnish population. Anthropometric measures included body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, available for Maamu Study participants only).
Depending on whether continuous or categorical anthropometric measures were used, age, sex and anthropometrics explained 13-18% of variation in HbA1c among persons of Russian origin, 5-10% among persons of Somali origin, 1-3% among persons of Kurdish origin and 11-13% among the general population. Also depending on whether continuous or categorical anthropometric measures were used, age, sex and anthropometrics explained 13-19% of variation in fasting blood glucose among persons of Russian origin, 15-20% among persons of Somali origin, 13-17% among persons of Kurdish origin and 16-17% among the general population. With exception for BMI, strength of the association between continuous anthropometric measures and HbA1c was significantly lower among persons of Kurdish origin compared with the general Finnish population (p =?0.044 for WC and p =?0.040 for WHtR).
A low degree of association between anthropometric measures and HbA1c was observed among persons of Kurdish origin. Findings of this study suggest caution is warranted when using HbA1c as a screening tool for glucose impairment among persons without diabetes in populations of diverse origin.
PubMed ID
30971258 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between discrimination and health: findings on Russian, Somali and Kurdish origin populations in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300351
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 10 01; 28(5):898-903
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
Shadia Rask
Irma T Elo
Seppo Koskinen
Eero Lilja
Päivikki Koponen
Anu E Castaneda
Author Affiliation
Department of Welfare, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 10 01; 28(5):898-903
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Middle East - ethnology
Minority Groups - statistics & numerical data
Russia - ethnology
Social Discrimination - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Somalia - ethnology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The Second European Union Minorities and Discrimination Survey recently demonstrated widespread discrimination across EU countries, with high discrimination rates observed in countries like Finland. Discrimination is known to negatively impact health, but fewer studies have examined how different types of perceived discrimination are related to health.
This study examines (i) the prevalence of different types of perceived discrimination among Russian, Somali and Kurdish origin populations in Finland, and (ii) the association between different types of perceived discrimination (no experiences; subtle discrimination only; overt or subtle and overt discrimination) and health (self-rated health; limiting long-term illness (LLTI) or disability; mental health symptoms). Data are from the Finnish Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study (n = 1795). Subtle discrimination implies reporting being treated with less courtesy and/or treated with less respect than others, and overt discrimination being called names or insulted and/or threatened or harassed. The prevalence of discrimination and the associations between discrimination and health were calculated with predicted margins and logistic regression.
Experiences of subtle discrimination were more common than overt discrimination in all the studied groups. Subtle discrimination was reported by 29% of Somali origin persons and 35% Russian and Kurdish origin persons. The prevalence of overt discrimination ranged between 22% and 24%. Experiences of discrimination increased the odds for poor self-reported health, LLTI and mental health symptoms, particularly among those reporting subtle discrimination only.
To promote the health of diverse populations, actions against racism and discrimination are highly needed, including initiatives that promote shared belonging.
PubMed ID
29878120 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between mental health symptoms and mobility limitation among Russian, Somali and Kurdish migrants: a population based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266869
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:275
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Shadia Rask
Anu E Castaneda
Päivikki Koponen
Päivi Sainio
Sari Stenholm
Jaana Suvisaari
Teppo Juntunen
Tapio Halla
Tommi Härkänen
Seppo Koskinen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:275
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Checklist
Chronic Disease - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - ethnology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Iraq - ethnology
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Russia - ethnology
Somalia - ethnology
Somatoform Disorders - ethnology
Transients and Migrants - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Research has demonstrated a bidirectional relationship between physical function and depression, but studies on their association in migrant populations are scarce. We examined the association between mental health symptoms and mobility limitation in Russian, Somali and Kurdish migrants in Finland.
We used data from the Finnish Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study (Maamu). The participants comprised 1357 persons of Russian, Somali or Kurdish origin aged 18-64 years. Mobility limitation included self-reported difficulties in walking 500?m or stair climbing. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25) and symptoms of somatization using the somatization subscale of the Symptom Checklist-90 Revised (SCL-90-R). A comparison group of the general Finnish population was selected from the Health 2011 study.
Anxiety symptoms were positively associated with mobility limitation in women (Russians odds ratio [OR] 2.98; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-6.94, Somalis OR 6.41; 95% CI 2.02-20.29 and Kurds OR 2.67; 95% CI 1.41-5.04), after adjustment for socio-demographic factors, obesity and chronic diseases. Also somatization increased the odds for mobility limitation in women (Russians OR 4.29; 95% CI 1.76-10.44, Somalis OR 18.83; 95% CI 6.15-57.61 and Kurds OR 3.53; 95% CI 1.91-6.52). Depressive symptoms were associated with mobility limitation in Russian and Kurdish women (Russians OR 3.03; 95% CI 1.27-7.19 and Kurds OR 2.64; 95% CI 1.39-4.99). Anxiety symptoms and somatization were associated with mobility limitation in Kurdish men when adjusted for socio-demographic factors, but not after adjusting for obesity and chronic diseases. Finnish women had similar associations as the migrant women, but Finnish men and Kurdish men showed varying associations.
Mental health symptoms are significantly associated with mobility limitation both in the studied migrant populations and in the general Finnish population. The joint nature of mental health symptoms and mobility limitation should be recognized by health professionals, also when working with migrants. This association should be addressed when developing health services and health promotion.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25884326 View in PubMed
Less detail

Baseline data from a planned RCT on attitudes to female genital cutting after migration: when are interventions justified?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291440
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Aug 11; 7(8):e017506
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Aug-11-2017
Author
Anna Wahlberg
Sara Johnsdotter
Katarina Ekholm Selling
Carina Källestål
Birgitta Essén
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Aug 11; 7(8):e017506
Date
Aug-11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude
Circumcision, Female - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Genitalia, Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Skin
Somalia - ethnology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To present the primary outcomes from a baseline study on attitudes towards female genital cutting (FGC) after migration.
Baseline data from a planned cluster randomised, controlled trial. Face-to-face interviews were used to collect questionnaire data in 2015. Based on our hypothesis that established Somalis could be used as facilitators of change among those newly arrived, data were stratified into years of residency in Sweden.
Sweden.
372 Somali men and women, 206 newly arrived (0-4 years), 166 established (>4 years).
Whether FGC is acceptable, preferred for daughter and should continue, specified on anatomical extent.
The support for anatomical change of girls and women's genitals ranged from 0% to 2% among established and from 4% to 8% among newly arrived. Among those supporting no anatomical change, 75%-83% among established and 53%-67% among newly arrived opposed all forms of FGC, with the remaining supporting pricking of the skin with no removal of tissue. Among newly arrived, 37% stated that pricking was acceptable, 39% said they wanted their daughter to be pricked and 26% reported they wanted pricking to continue being practised. Those who had lived in Sweden = 2?years had highest odds of supporting FGC; thereafter, the opposition towards FGC increased over time after migration.
A majority of Somali immigrants, including those newly arrived, opposed all forms of FGC with increased opposition over time after migration. The majority of proponents of FGC supported pricking. We argue that it would have been unethical to proceed with the intervention as it, with this baseline, would have been difficult to detect a change in attitudes given that a majority opposed all forms of FGC together with the evidence that a strong attitude change is already happening. Therefore, we decided not to implement the planned intervention.
Trial registration number NCT02335697;Pre-results.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28801440 View in PubMed
Less detail

Being a bridge: Swedish antenatal care midwives' encounters with Somali-born women and questions of violence; a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267056
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2015;15:1
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Ulrika Byrskog
Pia Olsson
Birgitta Essén
Marie-Klingberg Allvin
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2015;15:1
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication Barriers
Culturally Competent Care - methods
Female
Humans
Midwifery - methods
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - ethnology - psychology
Prenatal Care - methods
Qualitative Research
Refugees - psychology
Social Distance
Social Support
Somalia - ethnology
Sweden
Trust
Violence - psychology
Abstract
Violence against women is associated with serious health problems, including adverse maternal and child health. Antenatal care (ANC) midwives are increasingly expected to implement the routine of identifying exposure to violence. An increase of Somali born refugee women in Sweden, their reported adverse childbearing health and possible links to violence pose a challenge to the Swedish maternity health care system. Thus, the aim was to explore ways ANC midwives in Sweden work with Somali born women and the questions of exposure to violence.
Qualitative individual interviews with 17 midwives working with Somali-born women in nine ANC clinics in Sweden were analyzed using thematic analysis.
The midwives strived to focus on the individual woman beyond ethnicity and cultural differences. In relation to the Somali born women, they navigated between different definitions of violence, ways of handling adversities in life and social contexts, guided by experience based knowledge and collegial support. Seldom was ongoing violence encountered. The Somali-born women's' strengths and contentment were highlighted, however, language skills were considered central for a Somali-born woman's access to rights and support in the Swedish society. Shared language, trustful relationships, patience, and networking were important aspects in the work with violence among Somali-born women.
Focus on the individual woman and skills in inter-cultural communication increases possibilities of overcoming social distances. This enhances midwives' ability to identify Somali born woman's resources and needs regarding violence disclosure and support. Although routine use of professional interpretation is implemented, it might not fully provide nuances and social safety needed for violence disclosure. Thus, patience and trusting relationships are fundamental in work with violence among Somali born women. In collaboration with social networks and other health care and social work professions, the midwife can be a bridge and contribute to increased awareness of rights and support for Somali-born women in a new society.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25591791 View in PubMed
Less detail

Beyond Culture and Language: Access to Diabetes Preventive Health Services among Somali Women in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270771
Source
J Diabetes Res. 2015;2015:549795
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Abdi A Gele
Liv Elin Torheim
Kjell Sverre Pettersen
Bernadette Kumar
Source
J Diabetes Res. 2015;2015:549795
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication Barriers
Culture
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Diet
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Language
Norway
Preventive Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Sedentary lifestyle
Somalia - ethnology
Women
Abstract
Despite the high prevalence of type 2 diabetes in some immigrant and refugee communities in Norway, there is very little information available on their utilization of diabetes prevention interventions, particularly for women from Somali immigrant communities. A qualitative study of 30 Somali immigrant women aged 25 years and over was carried out in the Oslo area. Unstructured interviews were used to explore women's knowledge of diabetes, their access to preventive health facilities, and factors impeding their reception of preventive health programs targeted for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. The study participants were found to have a good knowledge of diabetes. They knew that a sedentary lifestyle and unhealthy diet are among the risk factors for diabetes. Regardless of their knowledge, participants reported a sedentary lifestyle accompanied with the consumption of an unhealthy diet. This was attributed to a lack of access to tailored physical activity services and poor access to health information. Considering gender-exclusive training facilities for Somali immigrant women and others with similar needs, in addition to access to tailored health information on diet, may encourage Somali women to adopt a healthy lifestyle, and it will definitely contribute to a national strategy for the prevention of diabetes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26266267 View in PubMed
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Births and induced abortions among women of Russian, Somali and Kurdish origin, and the general population in Finland -comparison of self-reported and register data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298949
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2018 Jul 10; 18(1):296
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-10-2018
Author
Satu Jokela
Eero Lilja
Tarja I Kinnunen
Mika Gissler
Anu E Castaneda
Päivikki Koponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Welfare, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Mannerheimintie 166, 00271, Helsinki, PL 30, Finland. satu.jokela@thl.fi.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2018 Jul 10; 18(1):296
Date
Jul-10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Birth Rate - ethnology
Contraception - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
Middle East - ethnology
Pregnancy
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Reproductive Health - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Russia - ethnology
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Somalia - ethnology
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Since reproductive health is often considered a highly sensitive topic, underreporting in surveys and under coverage of register data occurs frequently. This may lead to inaccurate information about the reproductive health. This study compares the proportion of women having births and induced abortions among migrant women of Russian, Somali and Kurdish origin in Finland to women in the general Finnish population and examines the agreement between survey- and register-based data.
The survey data from the Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study conducted in 2010-2012 and data from the Health 2011 Survey with corresponding information on women in the general population were used in this study. The respondents were women aged 18-64: 341 Russian, 176 Somali and 228 Kurdish origin women and 630 women in the general population. The survey data were linked to the Finnish Medical Birth Register and the Register of Induced Abortions.
In the combined (survey and register) data, migrant groups aged 30-64 had a higher proportion (89-96%) compared to the general population (69%) of women with at least one birth. Under-coverage of registered births was observed in all study groups. Among women aged 18-64, 36% of the Russian group and 24% of the Kurdish group reported more births in the survey than in the register data. In the combined data, the proportions of Russian origin (69%) and Kurdish origin (38%) women who have had at least one induced abortion in their lifetime are higher than in the general population (21%). Under-reporting of induced abortions in survey was observed among Somali origin women aged 18-29 (1% vs. 18%). The level of agreement between survey and register data was the lowest for induced abortions among the Somali and Russian groups (-?0.01 and 0.27).
Both survey- and register-based information are needed in studies on reproductive health, especially when comparing women with foreign origin with women in the general population. Culturally sensitive survey protocols need to be developed to reduce reporting bias.
PubMed ID
29991354 View in PubMed
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