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Adhesion and enrichment of metals on human hands from contaminated soil at an Arctic urban brownfield.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148602
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Aug 15;43(16):6385-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2009
Author
Steven D Siciliano
K. James
Guiyin Zhang
Alexis N Schafer
J Derek Peak
Author Affiliation
Department of Soil Science, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8, Canada, Steven.siciliano@usask.ca
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Aug 15;43(16):6385-90
Date
Aug-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adhesiveness
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cities
Hand
Humans
Metals - analysis
Occupational Exposure
Particle Size
Risk assessment
Soil
Soil Pollutants - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Human exposure to contaminated soils drives clean up criteria at many urban brownfields. Current risk assessment guidelines assume that humans ingest some fraction of soil smaller than 4 mm but have no estimates of what fraction of soil is ingested by humans. Here, we evaluated soil adherence to human hands for 13 agricultural soils from Saskatchewan, Canada and 17 different soils from a brownfield located in Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada. In addition, we estimated average particle size adhering to human hands for residents of a northern urban setting. Further, we estimated how metal concentrations differed between the adhered and bulk (
PubMed ID
19746741 View in PubMed
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Ammonium citrate as enhancement for electrodialytic soil remediation and investigation of soil solution during the process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266325
Source
Chemosphere. 2015 Jan;119:889-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Celia Dias-Ferreira
Gunvor M Kirkelund
Lisbeth M Ottosen
Source
Chemosphere. 2015 Jan;119:889-95
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromium - analysis - chemistry
Citric Acid - chemistry
Copper - analysis - chemistry
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Electrochemistry - methods
Environmental Restoration and Remediation - methods
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Quaternary Ammonium Compounds - chemistry
Soil - chemistry
Soil Pollutants - analysis - chemistry
Time Factors
Abstract
Seven electrodialytic experiments were conducted using ammonium citrate as enhancing agent to remediate copper and chromium-contaminated soil from a wood-preservation site. The purpose was to investigate the effect of current density (0.2, 1.0 and 1.5 mA cm(-2)), concentration of enhancing agent (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 M) and remediation times (21, 42 and 117 d) for the removal of Cu and Cr from a calcareous soil. To gain insight on metal behavior, soil solution was periodically collected using suction cups. It was seen that current densities higher than 1.0 mA cm(-2) did not increase removal and thus using too high current densities can be a waste of energy. Desorption rate is important and both remediation time and ammonium citrate concentration are relevant parameters. It was possible to collect soil solution samples following an adaptation of the experimental set-up to ensure continuous supply of ammonium citrate to the soil in order to keep it saturated during the remediation. Monitoring soil solution gives valuable information on the evolution of remediation and helps deciding when the soil is remediated. Final concentrations in the soil ranged from 220 to 360 mg Cu kg(-1) (removals: 78-86%) and 440-590 mg Cr kg(-1) (removals: 35-51%), being within the 500 mg kg(-1) limit for a clean soil only for Cu. While further optimization is still required for Cr, the removal percentages are the highest achieved so far, for a real Cu and Cr-contaminated, calcareous soil. The results highlight EDR potential to remediate metal polluted soils at neutral to alkaline pH by choosing a good enhancement solution.
PubMed ID
25240953 View in PubMed
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An eco-friendly method for heavy metal removal from mine tailings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298621
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Jun; 25(16):16202-16216
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Fereshteh Arab
Catherine N Mulligan
Author Affiliation
Department of Building, Civil, and Environmental Engineering, Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Jun; 25(16):16202-16216
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arsenic - analysis - chemistry
Copper - analysis - chemistry
Iron - analysis - chemistry
Metals, Heavy - analysis - chemistry
Mining
Soil Pollutants - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
One of the serious environmental problems that society is facing today is mine tailings. These byproducts of the process of extraction of valuable elements from ores are a source of pollution and a threat to the environment. For example, mine tailings from past mining activities at Giant Mines, Yellowknife, are deposited in chambers, stopes, and tailing ponds close to the shores of The Great Slave Lake. One of the environmentally friendly approaches for removing heavy metals from these contaminated tailing is by using biosurfactants during the process of soil washing. The objective of this present study is to investigate the effect of sophorolipid (SL) concentration, the volume of washing solution per gram of medium, pH, and temperature on the efficiency of sophorolipids in removing heavy metals from mine tailings. It was found that the efficiency of the sophorolipids depends on its concentration, and is greatly affected by changes in pH, and temperature. The results of this experiment show that increasing the temperature from 15 to 23 °C, while using sophorolipids, resulted in an increase in the removal of iron, copper, and arsenic from the mine tailing specimen, from 0.25, 2.1, and 8.6 to 0.4, 3.3, and 11.7%. At the same time, increasing the temperature of deionized water (DIW) from 15 to 23 °C led to an increase in the removal of iron, copper, and arsenic from 0.03, 0.9, and 1.8 to 0.04, 1.1, and 2.1%, respectively. By increasing temperature from 23 to 35 °C, when using sophorolipids, 22% reduction in the removal of arsenic was observed. At the same time while using DI water as the washing solution, increasing temperature from 23 to 35 °C resulted in 6.2% increase in arsenic removal. The results from this present study indicate that sophorolipids are promising agents for replacing synthetic surfactants in the removal of arsenic and other heavy metals from soil and mine tailings.
PubMed ID
29594884 View in PubMed
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Chemical and bioanalytical characterisation of PAHs in risk assessment of remediated PAH-contaminated soils.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113956
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2013 Dec;20(12):8511-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Maria Larsson
Jessika Hagberg
Anna Rotander
Bert van Bavel
Magnus Engwall
Author Affiliation
Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, 701 82, Orebro, Sweden, maria.larsson@oru.se.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2013 Dec;20(12):8511-20
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Assay
Environmental monitoring
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Humans
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis - chemistry - toxicity
Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon - metabolism
Risk assessment
Soil - chemistry
Soil Pollutants - analysis - chemistry - toxicity
Sweden
Abstract
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are common contaminants in soil at former industrial areas; and in Sweden, some of the most contaminated sites are being remediated. Generic guideline values for soil use after so-called successful remediation actions of PAH-contaminated soil are based on the 16 EPA priority pollutants, which only constitute a small part of the complex cocktail of toxicants in many contaminated soils. The aim of the study was to elucidate if the actual toxicological risks of soil samples from successful remediation projects could be reflected by chemical determination of these PAHs. We compared chemical analysis (GC-MS) and bioassay analysis (H4IIE-luc) of a number of remediated PAH-contaminated soils. The H4IIE-luc bioassay is an aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor-based assay that detects compounds that activate the Ah receptor, one important mechanism for PAH toxicity. Comparison of the results showed that the bioassay-determined toxicity in the remediated soil samples could only be explained to a minor extent by the concentrations of the 16 priority PAHs. The current risk assessment method for PAH-contaminated soil in use in Sweden along with other countries, based on chemical analysis of selected PAHs, is missing toxicologically relevant PAHs and other similar substances. It is therefore reasonable to include bioassays in risk assessment and in the classification of remediated PAH-contaminated soils. This could minimise environmental and human health risks and enable greater safety in subsequent reuse of remediated soils.
PubMed ID
23666634 View in PubMed
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Decreasing DOC trends in soil solution along the hillslopes at two IM sites in southern Sweden--geochemical modeling of organic matter solubility during acidification recovery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100307
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2010 Dec 1;409(1):201-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2010
Author
Stefan Löfgren
Jon Petter Gustafsson
Lage Bringmark
Author Affiliation
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, P.O. Box 7050, SE-750 07 UPPSALA, Sweden. Stefan.Lofgren@vatten.slu.se
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2010 Dec 1;409(1):201-10
Date
Dec-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acids - chemistry
Carbon - analysis - chemistry
Environmental monitoring
Models, Chemical
Soil Pollutants - analysis - chemistry
Solubility
Sweden
Abstract
Numerous studies report increased concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) during the last two decades in boreal lakes and streams in Europe and North America. Recently, a hypothesis was presented on how various spatial and temporal factors affect the DOC dynamics. It was concluded that declining sulphur deposition and thereby increased DOC solubility, is the most important driver for the long-term DOC concentration trends in surface waters. If this recovery hypothesis is correct, the DOC levels should increase both in the soil solution as well as in the surrounding surface waters as soil pH rises and the ionic strength declines due to the reduced input of SO(4)(2-) ions. In this project a geochemical model was set up to calculate the net humic charge and DOC solubility trends in soils during the period 1996-2007 at two integrated monitoring sites in southern Sweden, showing clear signs of acidification recovery. The Stockholm Humic Model was used to investigate whether the observed DOC solubility is related to the humic charge and to examine how pH and ionic strength influence it. Soil water data from recharge and discharge areas, covering both podzols and riparian soils, were used. The model exercise showed that the increased net charge following the pH increase was in many cases counteracted by a decreased ionic strength, which acted to decrease the net charge and hence the DOC solubility. Thus, the recovery from acidification does not necessarily have to generate increasing DOC trends in soil solution. Depending on changes in pH, ionic strength and soil Al pools, the trends might be positive, negative or indifferent. Due to the high hydraulic connectivity with the streams, the explanations to the DOC trends in surface waters should be searched for in discharge areas and peat lands.
PubMed ID
20937521 View in PubMed
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[EVALUATION OF MIGRATION ABILITY OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS IN THE "SOIL-PLANT" AND "SOIL-EARTHWORMS"].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275151
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016;95(4):336-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Yu I Baeva
N A Chernykh
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016;95(4):336-9
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Environmental Health - methods - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollution - analysis - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Moscow
Oligochaeta - drug effects - physiology
Plant Physiological Phenomena - drug effects
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - chemistry
Soil Pollutants - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
In the article there is given a hygienic assessment ofpolychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) contamination of soils of the city of Serpukhov of the Moscow region. For the first time there was investigated the PCB's ability to migrate in the system "soil-earthworms", and were calculated bioaccumulation factors at the different level of soil contamination. There was performed a comparative evaluation of the accumulation of given contaminants by higher terrestrial plants and representatives of soil paedobionts (Lumbricidae worms), and revealed clear differences in these processes. There was shown the possibility of the use of earthworms as a highly sensitive bio-indicators in monitoring for soil contamination by persistent organic pollutants, even at low concentrations.
PubMed ID
27430062 View in PubMed
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[FEATURES OF THE CONTENT OF MOVABLE FORMS OF HEAVY METALS AND SELENIUM IN SOILS OF THE YAROSLAVL REGION].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275150
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016;95(4):339-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
E A Bakaeva
A V Eremeyshvili
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016;95(4):339-43
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Health - methods - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollution - analysis - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Metals, Heavy - analysis - chemistry
Russia
Selenium - analysis - chemistry
Snow - chemistry
Soil Pollutants - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
With the use of the method of inversion voltammetry there was analyzed the content of movableforms of trace elements: (selenium, zinc, copper lead, cadmium) in soils in the Yaroslavl district of the Yaroslavl region, and also content of zinc, copper lead, cadmium in soils and snow cover in the city of Yaroslavl. According to values of concentrations of movable compounds in soils determined trace elements can be ranked into the following row: zinc > lead > copper > selenium > cadmium. There was revealed insufficient if compared with literature data concentrations, content of movable compounds of selenium, copper and zinc in examined explored soils. The maximal concentrations of lead are revealed in the close proximity to both the city of Yaroslavl and large highways of the city. It indicates to the anthropogenic pollution of soils by this element.
PubMed ID
27430063 View in PubMed
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Historical usage of aqueous film forming foam: a case study of the widespread distribution of perfluoroalkyl acids from a military airport to groundwater, lakes, soils and fish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268814
Source
Chemosphere. 2015 Jun;129:39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Marko Filipovic
Andreas Woldegiorgis
Karin Norström
Momina Bibi
Maria Lindberg
Ann-Helen Österås
Source
Chemosphere. 2015 Jun;129:39-45
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Airports
Animals
Drinking Water - standards
Fishes - metabolism
Fluorocarbons - analysis - chemistry
Groundwater - chemistry
Humans
Lakes - chemistry
Military Facilities
Muscle, Skeletal - chemistry
Soil Pollutants - analysis - chemistry
Surface Properties
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - chemistry
Water Supply - standards
Abstract
Historical usage of aqueous film forming foams (AFFFs) at military airports is a potential source of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) to the nearby environment. In this study, the distribution of perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in soil, groundwater, surface water, tap water well, and fish muscle was investigated at a closed down military airfield (F18) and its surroundings in Stockholm, Sweden. The presence of PFOS at AFFF training sites was inventoried. One major finding of the study is that a former airfield, abandoned since 1994, may still be a point source of PFAAs to nearby recipients. PFOS and PFOA were ubiquitous in the soil samples at former AFFF training sites with concentrations ranging from 2.18 to 8520ngg(-1) dry weight and
PubMed ID
25262531 View in PubMed
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[MONITORING OF THE CONTENT OF HEAVY METALS AND ELEMENTS IN THE SNOW COVER IN AGRICULTURAL SOILS AT THE TERRITORY OF THE MOSCOW REGION].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268683
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Sep-Oct;94(5):31-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
A A Ermakov
E A Karpova
A G Malysheva
R I Mikhaylova
I N Ryzhova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Sep-Oct;94(5):31-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Metals, Heavy - analysis - chemistry
Moscow
Snow - chemistry
Soil Pollutants - analysis - chemistry
Solubility
Abstract
The monitoring of snow cover pollution by heavy metals and elements (zinc, copper, lead, cadmium, arsenic, nickel, chromium, strontium, manganese, fluorine, lithium) was performed in 20 districts of the Moscow region in 2009, 2012 and 2013. The assessment of the levels of contamination by heavy metals and elements was given by means of comparison of them with the average values in the snow cover near Moscow in the end of the last century and in some areas of the world, that no exposed to technological environmental impact. 7 districts of Moscow region were characterized by a high content of lead and cadmium in the snow water. It requires the control of water, soil and agricultural products pollution.
PubMed ID
26625612 View in PubMed
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Monosilicic acid potential in phytoremediation of the contaminated areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280836
Source
Chemosphere. 2016 Aug;157:132-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Xionghui Ji
Saihua Liu
Juan Huang
Elena Bocharnikova
Vladimir Matichenkov
Source
Chemosphere. 2016 Aug;157:132-6
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adsorption
Biodegradation, Environmental
Biological Availability
Coordination Complexes - chemistry
Hordeum - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Humans
Metals, Heavy - analysis - chemistry - metabolism
Russia
Silicic Acid - chemistry
Soil Pollutants - analysis - chemistry - metabolism
Abstract
The contamination of agricultural areas by heavy metals has a negative influence on food quality and human health. Various remediation techniques have been developed for the removal and/or immobilization of heavy metals (HM) in contaminated soils. Phytoremediation is innovative technology, which has advantages (low cost, easy monitoring, high selectivity) and limitations, including long time for procedure and negative impact of contaminants on used plants. Greenhouse investigations have shown that monosilicic acid can be used for regulation of the HM (Cd, Cr, Pb and Zn) mobility in the soil-plant system. If the concentration of monosilicic acid in soil was increased from 0 to 20 mg L(-1) of Si in soil solution, the HM bioavailability was increased by 30-150%. However, the negative influence on the barley by HM was reduced under monosilicic acid application. If the concentration of monosilicic acid was increased more than 20 mg L(-1), the HM mobility in the soil was decreased by 40-300% and heavy metal uptake by plants was reduced 2-3 times. The using of the monosilicic acid may increase the phytoremediation efficiency. However the technique adaptation will be necessary for phytoremediation on certain areas.
PubMed ID
27213242 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.