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(90)Sr in King Bolete Boletus edulis and certain other mushrooms consumed in Europe and China.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275929
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Feb 1;543(Pt A):287-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2016
Author
Michal Saniewski
Tamara Zalewska
Grazyna Krasinska
Natalia Szylke
Yuanzhong Wang
Jerzy Falandysz
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Feb 1;543(Pt A):287-94
Date
Feb-1-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry
Basidiomycota - chemistry
China
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Radiation monitoring
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
The (90)Sr activity concentrations released from a radioactive fallout have been determined in a range of samples of mushrooms collected in Poland, Belarus, China, and Sweden in 1996-2013. Measurement of (90)Sr in pooled samples of mushrooms was carried out with radiochemical procedure aimed to pre-isolate the analyte from the fungal materials before it was determined using the Low-Level Beta Counter. Interestingly, the Purple Bolete Imperator rhodopurpureus collected from Yunnan in south-western China in 2012 showed (90)Sr activity concentration at around 10 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass, which was greater when compared to other mushrooms in this study. The King Bolete Boletus edulis from China showed the (90)Sr activity in caps at around 1.5 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass (whole fruiting bodies) in 2012 and for specimens from Poland activity was well lower than 1.0 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass in 1998-2010. A sample of Sarcodonimbricatus collected in 1998 from the north-eastern region of Poland impacted by Chernobyl fallout showed (90)Sr in caps at around 5 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass. Concentration of (90)Sr in Bay Bolete Royoporus (Xerocomus or Boletus) badius from affected region of Gomel in Belarus was in 2010 at 2.1 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass. In several other species from Poland (90)Sr was at
PubMed ID
26590866 View in PubMed
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(137)Cs distributions in soil and trees in forest ecosystems after the radioactive fallout - Comparison study between southern Finland and Fukushima, Japan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281005
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Sep;161:73-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Jukka Pumpanen
Mizue Ohashi
Izuki Endo
Pertti Hari
Jaana Bäck
Markku Kulmala
Nobuhito Ohte
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Sep;161:73-81
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Cryptomeria
Finland
Fukushima Nuclear Accident
Japan
Pinus
Plant Leaves - chemistry
Plant Stems - chemistry
Radioactive fallout
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Trees - chemistry
Abstract
The nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Fukushima released large amounts of (137)Cs radionuclides into the atmosphere which spread over large forest areas. We compared the (137)Cs concentration distribution in different parts of two coniferous forest ecosystems (needle litter, stems and at different depths in the soil) over short and long term periods in Finland and Japan. We also estimated the change in (137)Cs activity concentrations in needle and soil between 1995 and 2013 in Southern Finland based on the back-calculated (137)Cs activity concentrations. We hypothesized that if the (137)Cs activity concentrations measured in 1995 and 2013 showed a similar decline in concentration, the (137)Cs activity concentration in the ecosystem was already stable in 1995. But if not, the (137)Cs activity concentrations were still changing in 2013. Our results showed that the vertical distribution of the (137)Cs fallout in the soil was similar in Hyytiälä and Fukushima. The highest (137)Cs concentrations were observed in the uppermost surface layers of the soil, and they decreased exponentially deeper in the soil. We also observed that (137)Cs activity concentrations estimated from the samples in 1995 and 2013 in Finland showed different behavior in the surface soil layers compared to the deep soil layer. These results suggested that the (137)Cs nuclei were still mobile in the surface soil layers 27 years after the accident. Our results further indicated that, in the aboveground parts of the trees, the (137)Cs concentrations were much closer to steady-state when compared to those of the surface soil layers based on the estimated declining rates of (137)Cs concentration activity in needles which were similar in 1995 and 2013. Despite its mobility and active role in the metabolism of trees, the (137)Cs remains in the structure of the trees for decades, and there is not much exchange of (137)Cs between the heartwood and surface layers of the stem.
PubMed ID
27158060 View in PubMed
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137Cs in puddle sediments as timescale tracer in urban environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268380
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2015 Apr;142:9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Andrian A Seleznev
Ilia V Yarmoshenko
Alexander P Sergeev
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2015 Apr;142:9-13
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Cities
Environmental monitoring
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Radiation monitoring
Russia
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
The (137)Cs-based chronological approach is suggested to identify the age of urban landscapes and the chronology of pollution of soil in residential areas. Three main pivot points constitute the basis of the chronological approach: beginning of the Atomic Era in 1945, the maximum input in 1963 and the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Application of (137)Cs as a timescale tracer was tested on the example of Ekaterinburg, a city in the Middle Urals region of Russia. The sampling of recent urban sediments of micro water bodies (puddles) was carried out in 210 locations in 2007-2010. The concentrations of Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Mn and Fe, and activity concentrations of (137)Cs were measured. It was found that the (137)Cs concentrations in the puddle sediments correlated with the age of surrounding buildings determined by the year of construction. The correlations between the concentrations of metals and (137)Cs in the puddle sediments identified the major pollutants of the urban area, assessing their background concentrations and obtaining the average annual inputs.
PubMed ID
25615884 View in PubMed
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210Po, 210Pb, 40K and 137Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms and ingestion doses to man from high consumption rates of these wild foods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119426
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2013 Feb;116:34-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Justin P Gwynn
Anna Nalbandyan
Geir Rudolfsen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, The Fram Centre, N-9296 Tromsø, Norway. justin.gwynn@nrpa.no
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2013 Feb;116:34-41
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry
Angiosperms
Basidiomycota
Eating
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Norway
Radiation Dosage
Radiation monitoring
Radioisotopes - analysis
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
This paper discusses activity concentrations of (210)Po, (210)Pb, (40)K and (137)Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms collected from Øvre Dividalen national park, Northern Norway and derives committed effective ingestion doses to man based on high consumption rates of these wild foods. Edible wild berries and mushrooms accumulated similar levels of (210)Pb, but mushrooms accumulated higher levels of (210)Po and (40)K than berries. There appears to be a clear difference in the ability of Leccinum spp. of fungi to accumulate (210)Po and/or translocate (210)Po to mushrooms compared to Russula spp. of fungi. Activity concentrations of (137)Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms from Øvre Dividalen national park reflected the lower levels of fallout of this radionuclide in Northern Norway compared to more central areas following the Chernobyl accident. For mushrooms, ingestion doses are dominated by (210)Po, while for berries, (40)K is typically the main contributor to dose. Based on high consumption rates, ingestion doses arising from the combination of (210)Po, (210)Pb and (40)K were up to 0.05 mSv/a for berries and 0.50 mSv/a for mushrooms. Consumption of such wild foods may result in a significant contribution to total annual doses when consumed in large quantities, particularly when selecting mushrooms species that accumulate high activity concentrations of (210)Po.
PubMed ID
23103573 View in PubMed
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Assessment of current exposure of the population living in the Techa River basin from radioactive releases of the Mayak facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165656
Source
Health Phys. 2007 Feb;92(2):134-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Mikhail I Balonov
Gennady Y Bruk
Vladislav Y Golikov
Anatoly N Barkovsky
Eleonora M Kravtsova
Olga S Kravtosova
Akhat A Mubasarov
Vladimir N Shutov
Irena G Travnikova
Brenda J Howard
Justin Emrys Brown
Per Strand
Author Affiliation
Institute of Radiation Hygiene (IRH), St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
Health Phys. 2007 Feb;92(2):134-47
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Burden
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Nuclear Reactors
Nuclear Warfare
Radiation Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Radioactive Pollutants - analysis
Relative Biological Effectiveness
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Rivers
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Russia - epidemiology
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
Current doses arising from external and internal pathways have been estimated for the residents of two villages, Muslumovo and Brodokalmak, alongside the Techa River, which was contaminated by radioactive releases from the Mayak production facility. The dose estimates are based on numerous environmental measurements supplemented by further human whole body measurements and studies on occupational and dietary habits of Slavic and Turkish ethnic groups. Estimated doses arise mainly from use of the contaminated floodplains alongside the Techa River. The current average annual effective dose attributable to Cs and Sr in the environment, under conditions where restrictions on some river-related activities are in place, may exceed the Russian national action level of 1 mSv only in the hypothetical critical group of herdsmen in Muslumovo. The dose to this critical group in Brodokalmak is assessed to be 3 times less than that in Muslumovo and 2 fold below the action level. The external and internal exposures give comparable contributions to the total dose in both settlements and population groups: 47% and 53% in Muslumovo and 40% and 60% in Brodokalmak, respectively. About one quarter to one half of the internal dose in adults arises from the intake of Sr. In order to avoid substantial increases in the dose received by Muslumovo residents, it is expedient to prolong the current policy of restriction of some river-related population activities in this village.
PubMed ID
17220715 View in PubMed
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Behaviour of radionuclides during microbially-induced mining of nickel at Talvivaara, Eastern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276633
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Jan;151 Pt 1:105-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Hanna Tuovinen
Esa Pohjolainen
Janne Lempinen
Daniela Vesterbacka
David Read
Dina Solatie
Jukka Lehto
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Jan;151 Pt 1:105-13
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Mining
Nickel
Radiation monitoring
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
The Talvivaara mine in Eastern Finland utilizes microbe-induced heap leaching to recover nickel and other valuable metals (Zn, Cu, Co) from a black schist ore. In addition to the target metals, the ore contains uranium at a concentration of 17 mg/kg, incorporated as uraninite (UO2). Uranium oxidizes from the U(IV) to U(VI) state during leaching and dissolves as the uranyl ion (UO2(2+)) in the acidic pregnant leach solution. Mobilisation of uranium has caused sufficient concern that plans have been developed for uranium recovery. The aim of this study is to generate new data leading to a better understanding of the fate of its radiotoxic daughter nuclides, primarily (226)Ra, (210)Pb and (210)Po, in the mining process. It is shown that uranium daughters mostly remain in the heaps during the leaching process and are associated with secondary minerals, including jarosite, goethite and gypsum. Thorium and progeny ((232)Th plus (228)Th, (228)Ra) are also mainly retained. High sulphate concentrations in the acidic solutions limit the solubility of radium by incorporation in the crystal lattices of precipitated secondary sulphates. Electron probe microanalysis shows that goethite in the heaps is uraniferous, resulting from the adsorption of U(VI). After recovery of target metals, the pregnant leach solution is neutralized to further remove metal contaminants and the resulting slurries stored in a bunded tailings pond. The activity concentrations of thorium, radium, lead and polonium isotopes are generally low in the pond owing to prior retention by secondary minerals in the heaps. However, (238)U activity concentrations range up to 3375 Bq/kg, which exceeds the permitted value (1000 Bq/kg) for natural radionuclides of the (238)U series.
PubMed ID
26454201 View in PubMed
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[Bone mineral density in residents living on radioactive territories of Cheliabinsk Region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139874
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2010 Jul-Aug;50(4):481-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
E I Tolstykh
N B Shagina
L M Peremyslova
M O Degteva
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2010 Jul-Aug;50(4):481-91
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density - radiation effects
Bone Marrow - radiation effects
Bone and Bones - metabolism - radiation effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radioactive Hazard Release
Siberia
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Operation of "Mayak" plutonium production complex resulted in radioactive contamination of the part of Chelyabinsk Region in 1950-60s. Significant gas-aerosol emissions of 1311 occurred since 1948; in 1957, a radiation accident resulted in 90Sr contamination of large territories. This paper presents comparison of bone mineral density of persons lived on territories with different levels of soil 90Sr-contamination with a control group. It was found that in 1970-1975 the bone mineral density, estimated from mineral content in bone samples, in residents of contaminated areas born in 1936-1952 was significantly lower compared with the control group. For persons born in 1880-1935 such differences were not found. It was shown that the decrease in bone mineral density was not related to 90Sr exposure of osteogenic cells in the dose range from 0.1 to 1300 mGy: the coefficient of correlation between individual 90Sr-doses and bone mineral contents was not significant. The decrease in bone mineral density of persons born in 1936-1952 could be associated with exposure of thyroid and parathyroid glands (systemic regulators of calcium turnover) by 131I from gas-aerosol emissions from "Mayak". Maximum gas-aerosol emissions occurred in 1948-1954 and coincided with growth and development of thyroid gland, characterizing by intensive accumulation of 131I, and with growth and maturation of the skeleton of persons born in these calendar years.
PubMed ID
20968060 View in PubMed
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Calibration system for measuring the radon flux density.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271780
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2015 Jun;164(4):582-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
A. Onishchenko
M. Zhukovsky
V. Bastrikov
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2015 Jun;164(4):582-6
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adsorption
Algorithms
Calibration
Charcoal
Diffusion
Equipment Design
Mining
Radiation Exposure
Radiation Monitoring - instrumentation - methods
Radon - analysis
Russia
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Uranium
Abstract
The measurement of radon flux from soil surface is the useful tool for the assessment of radon-prone areas and monitoring of radon releases from uranium mining and milling residues. The accumulation chambers with hollow headspace and chambers with activated charcoal are the most used devices for these purposes. Systematic errors of the measurements strongly depend on the geometry of the chamber and diffusion coefficient of the radon in soil. The calibration system for the attestation of devices for radon flux measurements was constructed. The calibration measurements of accumulation chambers and chambers with activated charcoal were conducted. The good agreement between the results of 2D modelling of radon flux and measurements results was observed. It was demonstrated that reliable measurements of radon flux can be obtained by chambers with activated charcoal (equivalent volume ~75 l) or by accumulation chambers with hollow headspace of ~7-10 l and volume/surface ratio (height) of >15 cm.
PubMed ID
25977351 View in PubMed
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Characterization of uranium and plutonium containing particles originating from the nuclear weapons accident in Thule, Greenland, 1968.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175887
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2005;81(1):21-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
O C Lind
B. Salbu
K. Janssens
K. Proost
H. Dahlgaard
Author Affiliation
Isotope Laboratory, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian 10 University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 As, Norway. ole-christian.lind@umb.no
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2005;81(1):21-32
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation - statistics & numerical data
Autoradiography
Electron Probe Microanalysis
Elementary Particle Interactions
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Greenland
Humans
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Oxidation-Reduction
Particle Size
Plutonium - analysis - chemistry
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radioactive fallout - analysis
Radioactive Hazard Release - statistics & numerical data
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Spectrometry, Gamma
Synchrotrons
Uranium - analysis - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
To improve long-term radioecological impact assessment for the contaminated ecosystem of Bylot Sound, Greenland, U and Pu containing particles have been characterized with respect to particle size, elemental distribution, morphology and oxidation states. Based on scanning electron microscopy with XRMA, particles ranging from about 20 to 40 microm were isolated. XRMA and mu-XRF mapping demonstrated that U and Pu were homogeneously distributed throughout the particles, indicating that U and Pu have been fused. Furthermore, mu-XANES showed that U and Pu in the particles were present as mixed oxides. U was found to be in oxidation state IV whereas Pu apparently is a mixture of Pu(III) and Pu(IV). As previous assessments are based on PuO2 only, revisions should be made, taking Pu(III) into account.
PubMed ID
15748658 View in PubMed
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[Chernobyl accident: dosimetric evaluation and estimation of risks]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74102
Source
Radiol Med (Torino). 1986 Oct;72(10):699-704
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1986
Author
S. De Crescenzo
G. Tosi
M. Giacomelli
M. Granata
M. Pertosa
M. Tamponi
M. Verini
D. Zanni
Source
Radiol Med (Torino). 1986 Oct;72(10):699-704
Date
Oct-1986
Language
Italian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
English Abstract
Evaluation Studies
Female
Humans
Italy
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive Pollutants - analysis
Radiometry - methods
Risk
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Ukraine
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
The results of dosimetric evaluations carried out after Chernobyl accident in the Health Physics Department of Niguarda Ca' Granda Hospital (Milan) on air, rain and ground contamination are presented. The results obtained show that the incidence of stochastic late effects, both somatic and genetic, will be so low that practically will not be distinguishable from "natural" incidence.
Notes
Erratum In: Radiol Med (Torino) 1986 Dec;72(12):986
PubMed ID
3775087 View in PubMed
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87 records – page 1 of 9.