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(90)Sr in King Bolete Boletus edulis and certain other mushrooms consumed in Europe and China.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275929
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Feb 1;543(Pt A):287-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2016
Author
Michal Saniewski
Tamara Zalewska
Grazyna Krasinska
Natalia Szylke
Yuanzhong Wang
Jerzy Falandysz
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Feb 1;543(Pt A):287-94
Date
Feb-1-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry
Basidiomycota - chemistry
China
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Radiation monitoring
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
The (90)Sr activity concentrations released from a radioactive fallout have been determined in a range of samples of mushrooms collected in Poland, Belarus, China, and Sweden in 1996-2013. Measurement of (90)Sr in pooled samples of mushrooms was carried out with radiochemical procedure aimed to pre-isolate the analyte from the fungal materials before it was determined using the Low-Level Beta Counter. Interestingly, the Purple Bolete Imperator rhodopurpureus collected from Yunnan in south-western China in 2012 showed (90)Sr activity concentration at around 10 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass, which was greater when compared to other mushrooms in this study. The King Bolete Boletus edulis from China showed the (90)Sr activity in caps at around 1.5 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass (whole fruiting bodies) in 2012 and for specimens from Poland activity was well lower than 1.0 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass in 1998-2010. A sample of Sarcodonimbricatus collected in 1998 from the north-eastern region of Poland impacted by Chernobyl fallout showed (90)Sr in caps at around 5 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass. Concentration of (90)Sr in Bay Bolete Royoporus (Xerocomus or Boletus) badius from affected region of Gomel in Belarus was in 2010 at 2.1 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass. In several other species from Poland (90)Sr was at
PubMed ID
26590866 View in PubMed
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(137)Cs distributions in soil and trees in forest ecosystems after the radioactive fallout - Comparison study between southern Finland and Fukushima, Japan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281005
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Sep;161:73-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Jukka Pumpanen
Mizue Ohashi
Izuki Endo
Pertti Hari
Jaana Bäck
Markku Kulmala
Nobuhito Ohte
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Sep;161:73-81
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Cryptomeria
Finland
Fukushima Nuclear Accident
Japan
Pinus
Plant Leaves - chemistry
Plant Stems - chemistry
Radioactive fallout
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Trees - chemistry
Abstract
The nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Fukushima released large amounts of (137)Cs radionuclides into the atmosphere which spread over large forest areas. We compared the (137)Cs concentration distribution in different parts of two coniferous forest ecosystems (needle litter, stems and at different depths in the soil) over short and long term periods in Finland and Japan. We also estimated the change in (137)Cs activity concentrations in needle and soil between 1995 and 2013 in Southern Finland based on the back-calculated (137)Cs activity concentrations. We hypothesized that if the (137)Cs activity concentrations measured in 1995 and 2013 showed a similar decline in concentration, the (137)Cs activity concentration in the ecosystem was already stable in 1995. But if not, the (137)Cs activity concentrations were still changing in 2013. Our results showed that the vertical distribution of the (137)Cs fallout in the soil was similar in Hyytiälä and Fukushima. The highest (137)Cs concentrations were observed in the uppermost surface layers of the soil, and they decreased exponentially deeper in the soil. We also observed that (137)Cs activity concentrations estimated from the samples in 1995 and 2013 in Finland showed different behavior in the surface soil layers compared to the deep soil layer. These results suggested that the (137)Cs nuclei were still mobile in the surface soil layers 27 years after the accident. Our results further indicated that, in the aboveground parts of the trees, the (137)Cs concentrations were much closer to steady-state when compared to those of the surface soil layers based on the estimated declining rates of (137)Cs concentration activity in needles which were similar in 1995 and 2013. Despite its mobility and active role in the metabolism of trees, the (137)Cs remains in the structure of the trees for decades, and there is not much exchange of (137)Cs between the heartwood and surface layers of the stem.
PubMed ID
27158060 View in PubMed
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137Cs in puddle sediments as timescale tracer in urban environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268380
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2015 Apr;142:9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Andrian A Seleznev
Ilia V Yarmoshenko
Alexander P Sergeev
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2015 Apr;142:9-13
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Cities
Environmental monitoring
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Radiation monitoring
Russia
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
The (137)Cs-based chronological approach is suggested to identify the age of urban landscapes and the chronology of pollution of soil in residential areas. Three main pivot points constitute the basis of the chronological approach: beginning of the Atomic Era in 1945, the maximum input in 1963 and the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Application of (137)Cs as a timescale tracer was tested on the example of Ekaterinburg, a city in the Middle Urals region of Russia. The sampling of recent urban sediments of micro water bodies (puddles) was carried out in 210 locations in 2007-2010. The concentrations of Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Mn and Fe, and activity concentrations of (137)Cs were measured. It was found that the (137)Cs concentrations in the puddle sediments correlated with the age of surrounding buildings determined by the year of construction. The correlations between the concentrations of metals and (137)Cs in the puddle sediments identified the major pollutants of the urban area, assessing their background concentrations and obtaining the average annual inputs.
PubMed ID
25615884 View in PubMed
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210Po, 210Pb, 40K and 137Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms and ingestion doses to man from high consumption rates of these wild foods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119426
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2013 Feb;116:34-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Justin P Gwynn
Anna Nalbandyan
Geir Rudolfsen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, The Fram Centre, N-9296 Tromsø, Norway. justin.gwynn@nrpa.no
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2013 Feb;116:34-41
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry
Angiosperms
Basidiomycota
Eating
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Norway
Radiation Dosage
Radiation monitoring
Radioisotopes - analysis
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
This paper discusses activity concentrations of (210)Po, (210)Pb, (40)K and (137)Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms collected from Øvre Dividalen national park, Northern Norway and derives committed effective ingestion doses to man based on high consumption rates of these wild foods. Edible wild berries and mushrooms accumulated similar levels of (210)Pb, but mushrooms accumulated higher levels of (210)Po and (40)K than berries. There appears to be a clear difference in the ability of Leccinum spp. of fungi to accumulate (210)Po and/or translocate (210)Po to mushrooms compared to Russula spp. of fungi. Activity concentrations of (137)Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms from Øvre Dividalen national park reflected the lower levels of fallout of this radionuclide in Northern Norway compared to more central areas following the Chernobyl accident. For mushrooms, ingestion doses are dominated by (210)Po, while for berries, (40)K is typically the main contributor to dose. Based on high consumption rates, ingestion doses arising from the combination of (210)Po, (210)Pb and (40)K were up to 0.05 mSv/a for berries and 0.50 mSv/a for mushrooms. Consumption of such wild foods may result in a significant contribution to total annual doses when consumed in large quantities, particularly when selecting mushrooms species that accumulate high activity concentrations of (210)Po.
PubMed ID
23103573 View in PubMed
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The abundance of health-associated bacteria is altered in PAH polluted soils-Implications for health in urban areas?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287930
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(11):e0187852
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Anirudra Parajuli
Mira Grönroos
Sari Kauppi
Tomasz Plociniczak
Marja I Roslund
Polina Galitskaya
Olli H Laitinen
Heikki Hyöty
Ari Jumpponen
Rauni Strömmer
Martin Romantschuk
Nan Hui
Aki Sinkkonen
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(11):e0187852
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Finland
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis
Soil Microbiology
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Abstract
Long-term exposure to polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been connected to chronic human health disorders. It is also well-known that i) PAH contamination alters soil bacterial communities, ii) human microbiome is associated with environmental microbiome, and iii) alteration in the abundance of members in several bacterial phyla is associated with adverse or beneficial human health effects. We hypothesized that soil pollution by PAHs altered soil bacterial communities that had known associations with human health. The rationale behind our study was to increase understanding and potentially facilitate reconsidering factors that lead to health disorders in areas characterized by PAH contamination. Large containers filled with either spruce forest soil, pine forest soil, peat, or glacial sand were left to incubate or contaminated with creosote. Biological degradation of PAHs was monitored using GC-MS, and the bacterial community composition was analyzed using 454 pyrosequencing. Proteobacteria had higher and Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes had lower relative abundance in creosote contaminated soils than in non-contaminated soils. Earlier studies have demonstrated that an increase in the abundance of Proteobacteria and decreased abundance of the phyla Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes are particularly associated with adverse health outcomes and immunological disorders. Therefore, we propose that pollution-induced shifts in natural soil bacterial community, like in PAH-polluted areas, can contribute to the prevalence of chronic diseases. We encourage studies that simultaneously address the classic "adverse toxin effect" paradigm and our novel "altered environmental microbiome" hypothesis.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29145477 View in PubMed
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Accumulation and distribution of mercury in fruiting bodies by fungus Suillus luteus foraged in Poland, Belarus and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276806
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016 Feb;23(3):2749-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Martyna Saba
Jerzy Falandysz
Innocent C Nnorom
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016 Feb;23(3):2749-57
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Fruiting Bodies, Fungal - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Mercury - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Poland - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Republic of Belarus - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Soil - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Soil Pollutants - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Spectrophotometry, Atomic - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Sweden - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Vegetables - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Abstract
Presented in this paper is result of the study of the bioconcentration potential of mercury (Hg) by Suillus luteus mushroom collected from regions within Central, Eastern, and Northern regions of Europe. As determined by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy, the Hg content varied from 0.13 ? 0.05 to 0.33 ? 0.13 mg kg(-1) dry matter for caps and from 0.038 ? 0.014 to 0.095 ? 0.038 mg kg(-1) dry matter in stems. The Hg content of the soil substratum (0-10 cm layer) underneath the fruiting bodies showed generally low Hg concentrations that varied widely ranging from 0.0030 to 0.15 mg kg(-1) dry matter with mean values varying from 0.0078 ? 0.0035 to 0.053 ? 0.025 mg kg(-1) dry matter, which is below typical content in the Earth crust. The caps were observed to be on the richer in Hg than the stems at ratio between 1.8 ? 0.4 and 5.3 ? 2.6. The S. luteus mushroom showed moderate ability to accumulate Hg with bioconcentration factor (BCF) values ranging from 3.6 ? 1.3 to 42 ? 18. The consumption of fresh S. luteus mushroom in quantities up to 300 g week(-1) (assuming no Hg ingestion from other foods) from background areas in the Central, Eastern, and Northern part of Europe will not result in the intake of Hg exceeds the provisional weekly tolerance limit (PTWI) of 0.004 mg kg(-1) body mass.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26446731 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of 137Cesium and 90Strontium from abiotic and biotic sources in rodents at Chornobyl, Ukraine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61733
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2001 Sep;20(9):1927-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
R K Chesser
B E Rodgers
J K Wickliffe
S. Gaschak
I. Chizhevsky
C J Phillips
R J Baker
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics, University of Georgia, Athens 30602, USA. rchesser@ttu.edu
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2001 Sep;20(9):1927-35
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Animals
Animals, Wild
Arvicolinae
Cesium radioisotopes - pharmacokinetics
Diet
Environmental monitoring
Female
Male
Mice
Power Plants
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - pharmacokinetics
Strontium Radioisotopes - pharmacokinetics
Tissue Distribution
Trees
Ukraine
Abstract
Bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) and laboratory strains of house mice (Mus musculus BALB and C57BL) were relocated into enclosures in a highly contaminated area of the Red Forest near the Chornobyl (Ukraine) Reactor 4 to evaluate the uptake rates of 137Cs and 90Sr from abiotic sources. Mice were provided with uncontaminated food supplies, ensuring that uptake of radionuclides was through soil ingestion, inhalation, or water. Mice were sampled before introduction and were reanalyzed every 10 d for 137Cs uptake. Levels of 90Sr were assessed in subsamples from the native populations and in experimental animals at the termination of the study. Uptake rates in house mice were greater than those in voles for both 137Cs and 90Sr. Daily uptake rates in house mice were estimated at 2.72 x 10(12) unstable atoms per gram (whole body) for 137Cs and 4.04 x 10(10) unstable atoms per gram for 90Sr. Comparable rates in voles were 2.26 x 10(11) unstable atoms per gram for 137Cs and 1.94 x 10(10) unstable atoms per gram for 90Sr. By comparing values from voles in the enclosures to those from wild voles caught within 50 m of the enclosures, it was estimated that only 8.5% of 137Cs was incorporated from abiotic sources, leaving 91.5% being incorporated by uptake from biotic materials. The fraction of 90Sr uptake from abiotic sources was at least 66.7% (and was probably much higher). Accumulated whole-body doses during the enclosure periods were estimated as 174 mGy from intramuscular 137Cs and 68 mGy by skeletal 90Sr in house mice over 40 d and 98 mGy from 137Cs and 19 mGy from 90Sr in voles over 30 d. Thus, uptake of radionuclides from abiotic materials in the Red Forest at Chornobyl is an important source of internal contamination.
PubMed ID
11521818 View in PubMed
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Addressing arsenic bioaccessibility in ecological risk assessment: a novel approach to avoid overestimating risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91571
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2009 Mar;28(3):668-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Ollson Christopher A
Koch Iris
Smith Paula
Knopper Loren D
Hough Chris
Reimer Ken J
Author Affiliation
Jacques Whitford, Burlington, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2009 Mar;28(3):668-75
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arsenic - chemistry - pharmacokinetics
Biological Availability
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Industrial Waste
Mining
Northwest Territories
Peromyscus
Risk assessment
Soil Pollutants - chemistry - pharmacokinetics
Trees
Abstract
The risk of arsenic exposure to deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) living in areas of naturally and anthropogenically elevated arsenic levels was determined using three separate calculations of arsenic daily intake: Estimated daily intake (EDI), bioaccessible EDI (BEDI), and actual daily intake (ADI). The present work is of particular interest, because the risk assessments were determined for animals naturally exposed to arsenic. Gastric fluid extraction was used to obtain bioaccessibility data for soil and plant samples collected from three study sites (background, mine forest, and tailings) in Yellowknife (NT, Canada). Calculations using the EDI indicated that deer mice living in tailings habitat (average soil arsenic concentration, 1,740 +/- 2,240 microg/g) should have been experiencing serious health effects as a result of their exposure to arsenic. Using BEDI and ADI in the risk assessment calculation, however, resulted in an order-of-magnitude decrease in calculated risk. In addition, results calculated using the BEDI and ADI were not significantly different, suggesting that using bioaccessibility provides a more realistic estimate of potential risk. The present results provide evidence that the use of EDI in traditional risk assessments may seriously overestimate the actual risk, which in some instances may result in expensive and unnecessary clean-up measures.
PubMed ID
18939889 View in PubMed
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Adhesion and enrichment of metals on human hands from contaminated soil at an Arctic urban brownfield.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148602
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Aug 15;43(16):6385-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2009
Author
Steven D Siciliano
K. James
Guiyin Zhang
Alexis N Schafer
J Derek Peak
Author Affiliation
Department of Soil Science, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8, Canada, Steven.siciliano@usask.ca
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Aug 15;43(16):6385-90
Date
Aug-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adhesiveness
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cities
Hand
Humans
Metals - analysis
Occupational Exposure
Particle Size
Risk assessment
Soil
Soil Pollutants - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Human exposure to contaminated soils drives clean up criteria at many urban brownfields. Current risk assessment guidelines assume that humans ingest some fraction of soil smaller than 4 mm but have no estimates of what fraction of soil is ingested by humans. Here, we evaluated soil adherence to human hands for 13 agricultural soils from Saskatchewan, Canada and 17 different soils from a brownfield located in Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada. In addition, we estimated average particle size adhering to human hands for residents of a northern urban setting. Further, we estimated how metal concentrations differed between the adhered and bulk (
PubMed ID
19746741 View in PubMed
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Adsorptive bioremediation of soil highly contaminated with crude oil.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307791
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2020 Mar 01; 706:135739
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-01-2020
Author
Galina Vasilyeva
Victoria Kondrashina
Elena Strijakova
Jose-Julio Ortega-Calvo
Author Affiliation
Institute of Physicochemical and Biological Problems in Soil Science, RAS, Pushchino, Moscow region, Russia. Electronic address: gkvasilyeva@rambler.ru.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2020 Mar 01; 706:135739
Date
Mar-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Biodegradation, Environmental
Hydrocarbons
Petroleum
Prospective Studies
Russia
Soil
Soil Microbiology
Soil Pollutants
Abstract
Due to the extended oil extraction and transportation in Russia and other oil-producing countries, many lands remain contaminated because of accidental spills. This situation requires the cost-effective and efficient remediation of petroleum-contaminated soils. Bioremediation of soils contaminated with high concentrations of crude oil is usually hampered by high toxicity thresholds for microbial degraders. We have performed a two-year microfield experiment on the influence of a mixed adsorbent (ACD) composed of granular activated carbon and diatomite on bioremediation of a grey forest soil contaminated with crude oil at concentrations (5-15 % w/w) that would theoretically not result in a successful pollutant removal due to toxicity. Remediation of these soils was evaluated after treating with the ACD adsorbent (from 4 to 12% w/w) and a biopreparation (BP) containing hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, separately or in combination. Reduction of total petroleum hydrocarbons content was significantly greater in highly contaminated soils with the combined amendments than in the respective controls (through the activation of indigenous degrading microorganisms by fertilizing and mixing) by 9-10% and 5-8% at the end of the first and second years, respectively, depending on the contamination level. Significantly higher counts of petroleum-degrading microorganisms (as indigenous and introduced by the BP), as well as much less phytotoxicity was detected in the ACD-amended soils, as compared with the samples without adsorbent. In addition, the ACD mixture drastically reduced the wash-out of polar petroleum metabolites (evidently oxidized hydrocarbons) and the phytotoxicity of the lysimetric waters, especially in highly contaminated soils. The results indicate that the mixture of activated carbon and diatomite is a prospective adsorbent for the in situ bioremediation of soils highly contaminated with crude oil.
PubMed ID
31818568 View in PubMed
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