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3,520 medication errors evaluated to assess the potential for IT-based decision support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133611
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2011;166:31-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Kristine Binzer
Annemarie Hellebek
Author Affiliation
Unit for Patient Safety, Capital Region of Denmark.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2011;166:31-7
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Support Systems, Clinical - organization & administration
Denmark
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Medication Errors - classification - statistics & numerical data
Software Design
Abstract
We have previously studied system failures involved in medication errors using a limited number of root cause analyses as source. The aim of this study was to describe a larger number of medication errors with respect to harm, involved medicines and involved system problems - thus providing information for the development of IT-based decision support. We evaluated 3,520 medication error reports derived from 12 months of consecutive reporting from 13 hospitals in the Capital Region of Denmark. We found 0.65% errors with serious harm and 16% with moderate harm. A small number of medicines were involved in the majority of the errors. The problems in the medication error process were heterogeneous. Some were related to specific medicines and others were related to the computerized order entry system. Accordingly decision support targeted at specific medicines and improved IT systems are part of the continuing work to reduce the frequency of medication errors.
PubMed ID
21685608 View in PubMed
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[A data bank for the "Disaster Medicine" automated information retrieval system].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222951
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1992 Oct;(10):4-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
E A Nechaev
V S Krutov
Iu M Zakharov
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1992 Oct;(10):4-10
Date
Oct-1992
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Databases, Factual
Disasters
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
Humans
Information Systems
Military Medicine
Russia
Software Design
Abstract
The article substantiate the necessity to improve the automatization of the information process in the system of medical support in extreme situations and thus to liquidate the disproportion between the medico-diagnostical and information accumulation storage facilities. These facts clearly define the importance of work which is being carried out by Medical Service towards an elaboration of the "Disaster Medicine" automated information retrieval system (AIRS). The data obtained as a result of AIRS processing could be directly used for reference or prediction purposes.
PubMed ID
1481404 View in PubMed
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Source
Voen Med Zh. 1992 Oct;(10):10-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
A A Medenkov
S L Rysakova
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1992 Oct;(10):10-2
Date
Oct-1992
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Databases, Factual
Disasters
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
Humans
Russia
Software Design
Abstract
The effective system for the emergency health care in the disaster or calamity situations presupposes a wide application of computer facilities. The article shows the possibilities towards the improvement of medical support with the help of the disaster medicine information dissemination system. The authors give the main functional characteristics of this system which could make it possible to optimize the health care to the wounded and to make a correct distribution of assets.
PubMed ID
1481393 View in PubMed
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AKA-TPG: a program for kinetic and epidemiological analysis of data from labeled glucose investigations using the two-pool model and database technology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78693
Source
Diabetes Technol Ther. 2007 Feb;9(1):99-108
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Boston Raymond C
Stefanovski Darko
Henriksen Jan E
Ward Glen M
Moate Peter J
Author Affiliation
School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania 19348, USA. drrayboston@yahoo.com
Source
Diabetes Technol Ther. 2007 Feb;9(1):99-108
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Insulin - blood
Liver - metabolism
Male
Models, Biological
Population Groups
Radioactive Tracers
Software Design
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Two-Pool Glucose (TPG) model has an important role to play in diabetes research since it enables analysis of data obtained from the frequently sampled labeled (hot) glucose tolerance test (FSHGT). TPG modeling allows determination of the separate effects of insulin on the disposal of glucose and on the hepatic production of glucose. It therefore provides a basis for the accurate estimation of glucose effectiveness, insulin sensitivity, and the profile of the rate of endogenous glucose production. Until now, there has been no program available dedicated to the TPG model, and a number of technical reasons have deterred researchers from performing TPG analysis. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this paper, we describe AKA-TPG, a new program that combines automatic kinetic analysis of the TPG model data with database technologies. AKA-TPG enables researchers who have no expertise in modeling to quickly fit the TPG model to individual FSHGT data sets consisting of plasma concentrations of unlabeled glucose, labeled glucose, and insulin. Most importantly, because the entire process is automated, parameters are almost always identified, and parameter estimates are accurate and reproducible. AKA-TPG enables the demographic data of hundreds of individual subjects, their individual unlabeled and labeled glucose and insulin data, and each subject's parameters and indices derived from AKA-TPG to be securely stored in, and retrieved from, a database. We describe how the stratification and population analysis tools in AKA-TPG are used and present population estimates of TPG model parameters for young, healthy (without diabetes) Nordic men. CONCLUSION: Researchers now have a practical tool to enable kinetic and epidemiological analysis of TPG data sets.
PubMed ID
17316104 View in PubMed
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The ALPHA Project: an architecture for leveraging public health applications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171503
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2006 Oct-Nov;75(10-11):741-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
Cameron Turner
Hany Bishay
Bo Peng
Aaron Merifield
Author Affiliation
Information Technology Management Section, Public Health Agency of Canada, 130 Colonnade Road (A.L. 6501J), Ottawa, Ont., Canada K1A 0K9. Cameron_Turner@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2006 Oct-Nov;75(10-11):741-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communicable diseases
Humans
National Health Programs
Organizational Case Studies
Population Surveillance - methods
Software Design
Abstract
Public health surveillance applications are central to the collection, analysis and dissemination of disease and health information. As these applications evolve and mature, it is evident that many of these applications must address similar requirements, such as policies, security and flexibility. It is important a software architecture is created to meet these requirements.
We outline the requirements for a public health surveillance application, and define a set of common components to address these requirements. These components are configured to produce services used in the development of public health applications.
A layered software architecture, the ALPHA architecture, has been developed to support the development of public health applications. The architecture has been used to build eleven surveillance applications for the Public Health Agency of Canada in the areas of disease surveillance, survey, distributed data collection and inventory management.
We have found that a software architecture that addresses requirements on policies, security and flexibility facilitates the development of configurable public health applications. By creating this architecture, key success factors, such as reducing cost and time-to-market of applications, adapting to changing surveillance targets and increasing user efficiency are achieved.
PubMed ID
16356766 View in PubMed
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An activity-theoretical method for studying user participation in IS design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183365
Source
Methods Inf Med. 2003;42(4):398-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
S. Hyysalo
J. Lehenkari
Author Affiliation
Center for Activity Theory and Developmental Work Research, Department of Education, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 47 FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. sampsa.hyysalo@helsinki.fi
Source
Methods Inf Med. 2003;42(4):398-404
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Consumer Participation
Databases as Topic - organization & administration
Diabetes Mellitus - therapy
Disease Management
Finland
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Models, Theoretical
Software Design
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
This paper aims to present an activity-theoretical method for studying the effects of user participation in IS development.
This method is developed through a case study of the process of designing a diabetes database.
The method consists of a historical analysis of the design process, an ethnographical study of the use of the database, and researcher-driven interventions into the on-going user-producer interaction. In the historical analysis, we study particularly which user groups of the database have influenced the design work and which perspectives need to be incorporated into the design in the near future. An analytical model consisting of perspectives on local design, particular technology, and societal domain is introduced as a conceptual tool for this analysis. We also introduce the possibility of employing the historical analysis in guiding an ethnographical study of the user sites and researcher-driven interventions, which provide the participants with tools for improving their design process.
PubMed ID
14534640 View in PubMed
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Application of a responsive evaluation approach in medical education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186515
Source
Med Educ. 2003 Mar;37(3):256-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Vernon Curran
Jeanette Christopher
Francine Lemire
Alice Collins
Brendan Barrett
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada Faculty of Education, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada. vcurran@mun.ca
Source
Med Educ. 2003 Mar;37(3):256-66
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Continuing - standards
Feasibility Studies
Humans
Newfoundland and Labrador
Program Evaluation - methods
Software Design
Abstract
This paper reports on the usefulness of a responsive evaluation model in evaluating the clinical skills assessment and training (CSAT) programme at the Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the responsive evaluation approach, ascertain its utility, feasibility, propriety and accuracy in a medical education context, and discuss its applicability as a model for medical education programme evaluation.
Robert Stake's original 12-step responsive evaluation model was modified and reduced to five steps, including: (1) stakeholder audience identification, consultation and issues exploration; (2) stakeholder concerns and issues analysis; (3) identification of evaluative standards and criteria; (4) design and implementation of evaluation methodology; and (5) data analysis and reporting. This modified responsive evaluation process was applied to the CSAT programme and a meta-evaluation was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach.
The responsive evaluation approach was useful in identifying the concerns and issues of programme stakeholders, solidifying the standards and criteria for measuring the success of the CSAT programme, and gathering rich and descriptive evaluative information about educational processes. The evaluation was perceived to be human resource dependent in nature, yet was deemed to have been practical, efficient and effective in uncovering meaningful and useful information for stakeholder decision-making.
Responsive evaluation is derived from the naturalistic paradigm and concentrates on examining the educational process rather than predefined outcomes of the process. Responsive evaluation results are perceived as having more relevance to stakeholder concerns and issues, and therefore more likely to be acted upon. Conducting an evaluation that is responsive to the needs of these groups will ensure that evaluative information is meaningful and more likely to be used for programme enhancement and improvement.
PubMed ID
12603765 View in PubMed
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Application of Lean Six Sigma for patients presenting with ST-elevation myocardial infarction: the Hamilton Health Sciences experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170153
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(1):56-61, 2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Ayad Aldarrab
Author Affiliation
Royal College Residency Training Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. Edarrab@hotmail.com
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(1):56-61, 2
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benchmarking
Crowding
Electric Countershock - utilization
Electrocardiography - utilization
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards - utilization
Humans
Institutional Management Teams
Models, organizational
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy
Ontario
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Software Design
Thrombolytic Therapy - utilization
Time Factors
Abstract
Most patients with symptomatic acute myocardial infarction (AMI), the leading cause of death in western industrialized nations, use the emergency department (ED) as their point of entry. Yet, one identified barrier to early recognition of patients with AMI is ED overcrowding. In this paper, the author presents a quality improvement model that applies Lean Six Sigma guidelines to the clinical setting.
Notes
Erratum In: Healthc Q. 2006;9(2):16
PubMed ID
16548435 View in PubMed
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Cerebral palsy and neonatal death in term singletons born small for gestational age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118821
Source
Pediatrics. 2012 Dec;130(6):e1629-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Magne Stoknes
Guro L Andersen
Magnus Odin Dahlseng
Jon Skranes
Kjell Å Salvesen
Lorentz M Irgens
Jennifer J Kurinczuk
Torstein Vik
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. magne.stoknes@gmail.com
Source
Pediatrics. 2012 Dec;130(6):e1629-35
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apgar score
Birth weight
Cause of Death
Cerebral Palsy - mortality
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - mortality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - mortality
Gestational Age
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Male
Norway
Obstetric Labor Complications - mortality
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - mortality
Registries
Risk factors
Software Design
Stillbirth
Abstract
To investigate the probable timing of events leading to cerebral palsy (CP) in singletons born small for gestational age (SGA) at term, taking neonatal death into consideration.
In this registry-based cohort study, data on 400 488 singletons born during 1996-2003 were abstracted from the Medical Birth and the CP registries of Norway. Among 36 604 SGA children (birth weight
PubMed ID
23166338 View in PubMed
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Children as design partners in the development of a support system for children with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79825
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2006;122:80-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Ruland Cornelia M
Slaughter Laura
Starren Justin
Vatne Torun M
Author Affiliation
Center for Shared Decision Making and Nursing Research, Rikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet HF, Oslo, Norway. cornelia.ruland@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2006;122:80-5
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Decision Support Systems, Clinical
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Neoplasms
Norway
Patient Participation
Pediatrics
Software Design
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
Children with cancer experience many symptoms and problems that often remain unreported and untreated. We therefore, developed PedsChoice, a support system for pediatric cancer symptom assessment and management to provide children with a "voice," and assist nurses and physicians to better address children's symptoms and problems in patient care. We used participatory design techniques where healthy children joined our design team. During this process we explored the role s healthy children can appropriately play to inform the design of a system for children with cancer and their contributions and limitations as participants in the design process. We found that healthy children can contribute considerably in the role as testers, informers and to some extent as partners. Children have very creative design ideas that can considerably improve the software. However, system development for seriously ill children also requires psychological and pedagogical insights and design and usability expertise. This limits the role children can play as full design partners.
PubMed ID
17102222 View in PubMed
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51 records – page 1 of 6.