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Iodine insufficiency: a global health problem?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107237
Source
Adv Nutr. 2013;4(5):533-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Christine A Swanson
Elizabeth N Pearce
Author Affiliation
Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.
Source
Adv Nutr. 2013;4(5):533-5
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Congresses as topic
Dietary Supplements
Female
Food, Fortified
Health promotion
Humans
Iodine - deficiency - therapeutic use - urine
Lactation
Male
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Sciences - methods - trends
Nutritional Status
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - diet therapy - prevention & control - urine
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Recommended dietary allowances
Societies, Scientific
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - therapeutic use
United States
World Health
Abstract
As a result of collaborative efforts with international organizations and the salt industry, many developing and developed countries practice universal salt iodization (USI) or have mandatory salt fortification programs. As a consequence, the prevalence of iodine deficiency decreased dramatically. The United States and Canada are among the few developed countries that do not practice USI. Such an undertaking would require evidence of deficiency among vulnerable population groups, including pregnant women, newborns, and developing infants. Government agencies in the United States rely heavily on data from NHANES to assess the iodine status of the general population and pregnant women in particular. NHANES data suggest that pregnant women in the United States remain mildly deficient. This is important, because the developing fetus is dependent on maternal iodine intake for normal brain development throughout pregnancy. Professional societies have recommended that pregnant and lactating women, or those considering pregnancy, consume a supplement providing 150 µg iodine daily. The United States and Canada collaborate on the daily recommended intake and are also confronted with the challenge of identifying the studies needed to determine if USI is likely to be beneficial to vulnerable population groups without exposing them to harm.
Notes
Cites: Nutrition. 2005 Mar;21(3):325-3115797674
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Dec;95(12):5217-2420810570
Cites: Br Med Bull. 2011;97:137-4821186204
Cites: Nutr Rev. 2012 Oct;70(10):553-7023035804
Cites: J Nutr. 2013 Jun;143(6):872-723616501
PubMed ID
24038248 View in PubMed
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Iodine intake and thyroid carcinoma--a potential risk factor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21319
Source
Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes. 1998;106 Suppl 3:S38-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
S. Franceschi
Author Affiliation
Servizio di Epidemiologia, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano, Italia. franceschis@ets.it
Source
Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes. 1998;106 Suppl 3:S38-44
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Goiter, Endemic
Humans
Iodine - administration & dosage - deficiency - therapeutic use
Male
Risk factors
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - therapeutic use
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Thyrotropin - secretion
Abstract
The role of enhanced thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) secretion, in the aetiology of thyroid cancer is not totally consistent. Circumstances and conditions which cause (e.g., iodine deficiency, through suboptimal intake in water and food) or indicate (e.g., goitre) increased TSH secretion have been associated to increased risk of thyroid cancer, most notably follicular and anaplastic carcinomas. Elevated incidence and mortality rates of thyroid cancer, however, are also found in areas were iodine intake is high (Hawaii, Iceland). At least in some countries (Switzerland), a favourable impact of the introduction of iodized salt on mortality from thyroid cancer has been reported. Elsewhere, the correction of iodine deficiency has coincided with elevations of diagnostic standards (e.g., spread of thyroid scintigraphy, ultrasound, and fine-needle biopsy) and corresponding increases in incidence of papillary carcinomas, often clinically silent, thus hampering a distinction of the two phenomena. Upward trends of papillary carcinoma incidence have, however, been seen in most affluent countries, irrespective of the iodine status of the population.
PubMed ID
9865553 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Prevention of iodine-deficient diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175277
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2005 Jan-Feb;(1):25-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
F A Dzhatdoeva
L E Syrtsova
G A Gerasimov
T E Zubrilova
Z N Salpagarova
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2005 Jan-Feb;(1):25-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Goiter - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Iodine - deficiency - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Primary Prevention - methods - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Russia
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - therapeutic use
Abstract
The Interregional center of public health and development assisted by Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy undertook, 1999-2000, a study of the standard of knowledge, attitude and conduct of consumers in respect to the use of iodinated salt (IS) in the prevention of iodine-deficient diseases (IDD). It was demonstrated that, on the average per one district, 19% of city respondents and 13% of rural respondents used IS only. About 31% of city respondents used IS when it was available at the next-door shop, i.e. from time to time. This figure reached 48% in Irkutsk and Orenburg Regions. The share of those who used IS sometimes in rural regions made an average of 20.7%. 67.2% of those who believe that IDD can be prevented think that ID can also be prevented. Less than 5% of them say ID cannot be regarded as a reliable tool in the prevention of IDD.
PubMed ID
15828388 View in PubMed
Less detail