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Accounts of pain experience in an elderly care context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146404
Source
Commun Med. 2010;7(1):55-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Ulla Hellström Muhli
Author Affiliation
School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Sweden.
Source
Commun Med. 2010;7(1):55-64
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Communication
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Narration
Pain - psychology
Pain Measurement
Professional-Patient Relations
Psycholinguistics
Qualitative Research
Sociometric Techniques
Sweden
Abstract
This article aims to show how a discourse and communication based approach in the context of the care of the elderly provides a basis for reflecting on pain. Based on six hours of data from talk encounters between care professionals and elderly clients, an activity analysis of institutional settings and categorization of interactional discourse was undertaken. The focus was: (a) how elderly people initiated painful accounts, and (b) how the professionals oriented to such accounts. It is found that pain-talks are governed by the institutional practice of different phases:framing; mapping troubles and symptoms; clients' self presentations; counseling, and concluding. This phase structure exemplifies knowledge of communicative activities and is part of practical knowledge which the party, or at least the professional, is expected to become acquainted with. A thematic interactional map of critical moments related to pain as (a) social death and hope, and (b) presentation of self as past and self as present emerges. The caring aspect is to support hope and to change the focus from social death to life and recovering. In foregrounding health, it is important for the elderly people to affirm their identity of themselves as being good and honest persons.
PubMed ID
21462857 View in PubMed
Less detail

Constructing and negotiating 'change' in follow-up meetings for intimately violent men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146403
Source
Commun Med. 2010;7(1):65-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Terhi Partanen
Jarl Wahlström
Juha Holma
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Outpatient Services, Tampere, Finland. terhi.partanen@tampere.fi
Source
Commun Med. 2010;7(1):65-74
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Narration
Negotiating
Professional-Patient Relations
Psycholinguistics
Psychotherapeutic Processes
Psychotherapy, Group
Sociometric Techniques
Violence - psychology
Abstract
This study reports on follow-up meetings of a group treatment program for intimately violent men. The focus is on the construction of change narratives; on how indicators of 'successful change' are negotiated and produced in the conversations. We describe in detail five discursive strategies used by client and therapist participants, e.g., the construction of temporal differences, personalizing the problem, reformulations of failure stories, taking presence at the follow-up as evidence of success, and the use of out-siders as an audience. We also demonstrate how the notion of success is ascertained and to whom credit is given for achieving it. We conclude that the followup meetings are established as an integrated part of the whole treatment program, and contribute to the promotion of the treatment ideology.
PubMed ID
21462858 View in PubMed
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Do friends' characteristics moderate the prospective links between peer victimization and reactive and proactive aggression?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163540
Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2007 Aug;35(4):665-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Véronique Lamarche
Mara Brendgen
Michel Boivin
Frank Vitaro
Ginette Dionne
Daniel Pérusse
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, CP 8888, succ. centre-ville, Montréal, QC, Canada, H3C 3P8. Lamarche.Veronique@courrier.uqam.ca
Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2007 Aug;35(4):665-80
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggression - psychology
Agonistic Behavior
Child
Crime Victims - psychology
Female
Friends - psychology
Hostility
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Peer Group
Quebec
Social Adjustment
Social Facilitation
Social Support
Sociometric Techniques
Twins - psychology
Abstract
This study examined (a) the predictive link between peer victimization and children's reactive and proactive aggression, and (b) the potential moderating effect of reciprocal friends' reactive and proactive aggression in this context. The study also examined whether these potential moderating effects of friends' characteristics were stronger with respect to more recent friends compared to previous friends. Based on a convenience sample of 658 twin children (326 boys and 332 girls) assessed in kindergarten and first grade, the results showed that peer victimization uniquely predicted an increase in children's teacher-rated reactive aggression, but not teacher-rated proactive aggression. The relation of peer victimization to increased reactive aggression was, however, moderated by recent not previous reciprocal friends' similarly aggressive characteristics. These findings, however, tended to be mostly true for boys, but not for girls. The findings are discussed in terms of their theoretical and practical implications for victimized children's risk of displaying reactive and proactive aggressive behaviors.
PubMed ID
17503177 View in PubMed
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Environment and waiting behaviors in emergency waiting areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237536
Source
Child Health Care. 1985;13(4):174-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
D. Alcock
J. Goodman
W. Feldman
P J McGrath
M. Park
M. Cappelli
Source
Child Health Care. 1985;13(4):174-80
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Child, Preschool
Data Collection
Emergency Service, Hospital
Family
Female
Health Facility Environment
Humans
Male
Ontario
Sociometric Techniques
Time Factors
Abstract
Environmental conditions and waiting behaviors of 625 children and their families were recorded in the waiting room and suture hall of a children's hospital and a general hospital. Randomized intervention and control days at the children's hospital resulted in children and their families being assigned to an experimental group receiving child life intervention or to a control group who did not receive child life intervention. A second control group at the general hospital did not receive child life intervention. The average waiting time was 1.5 hr. Significant differences were observed in noise level between the children's hospital and general hospital waiting areas, waiting behaviors of children who received child life intervention and those who did not, and parent-child interaction among the three groups. Suggestions for further study regarding the optimal use of waiting time are included.
PubMed ID
10300050 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of a social network HIV prevention intervention program for young men who have sex with men in Russia and Bulgaria.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184449
Source
AIDS Educ Prev. 2003 Jun;15(3):205-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Yuri A Amirkhanian
Jeffrey A Kelly
Elena Kabakchieva
Timothy L McAuliffe
Sylvia Vassileva
Author Affiliation
Center for AIDS Intervention Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, 2017 N Summit Avenue, Milwaukee 53202, USA. yuri@mcw.edu
Source
AIDS Educ Prev. 2003 Jun;15(3):205-20
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bulgaria
Condoms - utilization
Follow-Up Studies
HIV Infections - prevention & control
Health Planning - methods
Homosexuality, Male - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Leadership
Male
Program Evaluation
Risk Reduction Behavior
Russia
Safe Sex - statistics & numerical data
Sex Education - organization & administration
Social Support
Sociometric Techniques
Abstract
HIV prevention, by intervening within social networks, is potentially important but highly understudied. Approaches that systematically identify, train, and enlist known social influence leaders to advise members of their own networks in risk reduction constitute ways to reach hidden population segments, persons who are distrustful of authorities but trust their peers, and those who cannot be reached through traditional professionally delivered counseling. This article illustrates and provides evaluation data on a program that recruited 14 intact social networks of young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in St. Petersburg, Russia, and Sofia, Bulgaria. Sociometric measures were used to identify the social leader of each network, and baseline risk assessment measures were administered to all members of each social network. The sociometrically determined leaders then attended a six-session group program that provided training and guidance in how to carry out theory-based and tailored HIV prevention conversations with members of their own social networks. Four months after leaders completed the program, all network members were readministered risk assessment measures. Pre- to postintervention data revealed that the program produced: (1) increases in the level and comfort with which network members talked about AIDS prevention topics in their daily conversations; (2) increased network-level AIDS risk reduction knowledge and improved risk reduction norm perceptions, attitudes, behavioral intentions, and self-efficacy; and (3) increased condom use levels among network members. Although not a controlled, randomized trial, these program evaluation findings strongly support the feasibility of social network-level HIV prevention approaches.
PubMed ID
12866833 View in PubMed
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Gender differences in developmental links among antisocial behavior, friends' antisocial behavior, and peer rejection in childhood: results from two cultures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173775
Source
Child Dev. 2005 Jul-Aug;76(4):841-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
Pol A C van Lier
Frank Vitaro
Brigitte Wanner
Patricia Vuijk
Alfons A M Crijnen
Author Affiliation
Erasmus MC--Sophia, Rotterdam, Netherlands. pac.van.lier@psy.vu.nl
Source
Child Dev. 2005 Jul-Aug;76(4):841-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antisocial Personality Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Netherlands
Peer Group
Personality Development
Psychometrics
Quebec
Rejection (Psychology)
Risk
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Social Facilitation
Sociometric Techniques
Abstract
This study addressed gender differences in the developmental links among antisocial behavior, friends' antisocial behavior, and peer rejection. High and increasing, moderate, and low antisocial developmental trajectories were identified among 289 Dutch children, ages 7 to 10, and 445 French-Canadian children, ages 9 to 12. Only boys followed the high trajectory. These boys had more deviant friends and were more often rejected than other children. A minority of girls followed the moderate antisocial behavior trajectory. These girls had fewer deviant friends than moderate antisocial boys, but moderate antisocial boys and girls were equally likely to be rejected. The influence of friends and poor peer relations plays a crucial but different role in the development of antisocial behavior among boys and girls.
Notes
Erratum In: Child Dev. 2006 Jan-Feb;77(1):244
PubMed ID
16026500 View in PubMed
Less detail

Loneliness among school-aged children and their parents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150608
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2009 Jun;50(3):211-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Niina Junttila
Marja Vauras
Author Affiliation
Centre for Learning Research and Department of Teacher Education, University of Turku, Finland. Niina.Junttila@utu.fi
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2009 Jun;50(3):211-9
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cooperative Behavior
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Fathers - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Loneliness - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mothers - psychology
Parent-Child Relations
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Sociometric Techniques
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the existence of the intergenerational transmission of loneliness between parents and children, including an examination of its stability and of gender differences. The study consisted of an evaluation of loneliness in mothers (n= 834), fathers (n= 661) and their 10-year-old children (n= 981). Parent's self-reported loneliness was measured once, and their children's social and emotional loneliness were assessed at three time-points. The stability analysis indicated average stability in children's loneliness, especially their social loneliness. Boys were found to experience more emotional loneliness than girls. Structural equation modeling indicated no direct relationship between mothers'/fathers' loneliness and their children's loneliness. However, mothers' and fathers' loneliness reduced their daughters' peer-evaluated cooperating skills, which consequently predicted higher levels of both social and emotional loneliness.
PubMed ID
19490524 View in PubMed
Less detail

Middle childhood and adolescent contextual and personal predictors of adult educational and occupational outcomes: a mediational model in two countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167634
Source
Dev Psychol. 2006 Sep;42(5):937-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Eric F Dubow
L Rowell Huesmann
Paul Boxer
Lea Pulkkinen
Katja Kokko
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403, USA. edubow@bgnet.bgsu.edu
Source
Dev Psychol. 2006 Sep;42(5):937-49
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aggression - psychology
Career Choice
Career Mobility
Child
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
New York
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Sociometric Techniques
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
The authors examined the prediction of occupational attainment by age 40 from contextual and personal variables assessed during childhood and adolescence in 2 participant samples: (a) the Columbia County Longitudinal Study, a study of 856 third graders in a semirural county in New York State that began in 1960, and (b) the Jyv?skyl? Longitudinal Study of Personality and Social Development, a study of 369 eight-year-olds in Jyv?skyl?, Finland, that began in 1968. Both samples were followed up during adolescence and early and middle adulthood. Structural modeling analyses revealed that in both countries, for both genders, children's age 8 cognitive-academic functioning and their parents' occupational status had independent positive long-term effects on the children's adult occupational attainment, even after other childhood and adolescent personal variables were controlled for. Further, childhood and adolescent aggressive behavior negatively affected educational status in early adulthood, which in turn predicted lower occupational status in middle adulthood.
PubMed ID
16953698 View in PubMed
Less detail

26 records – page 1 of 3.