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124 records – page 1 of 13.

Addressing the non-medical determinants of health: a survey of Canada's health regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165318
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jan-Feb;98(1):41-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
C James Frankish
Glen E Moulton
Darryl Quantz
Arlene J Carson
Ann L Casebeer
John D Eyles
Ronald Labonte
Brian E Evoy
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Promotion Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Frankish@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jan-Feb;98(1):41-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Priorities - organization & administration
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Public Health Administration
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Rural Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Sociology, Medical
Urban health
Abstract
The Canadian health system is undergoing reform. Over the past decade a prominent trend has been creation of health regions. This structural shift is concurrent with a greater emphasis on population health and the broad determinants of health. In parallel, there is a movement toward more intersectoral collaboration (i.e., collaboration between diverse segments of the health system, and between the health system and other sectors of society). The purpose of this exploratory study is to determine the self-reported level of internal action (within regional health authorities) and intersectoral collaboration around 10 determinants of health by regional health authorities across Canada.
From September 2003 to February 2004, we undertook a survey of regional health authorities in Canadian provinces (N = 69). Using SPSS 12.0, we generated frequencies for the self-reported level of internal and intersectoral action for each determinant. Other analyses were done to compare rural/suburban and urban regions, and to compare Western, Central and Eastern Canada.
Of the 10 determinants of health surveyed, child development and personal health practices were self-reported by the majority of health regions to receive greatest attention, both internally and through intersectoral activities. Culture, gender and employment/working conditions received least attention in most regions.
The exploratory survey results give us the first Canadian snapshot of health regions' activities in relation to the broad range of non-medical determinants of health. They provide a starting data set for baselining future progress, and for beginning deeper analyses of specific areas of action and intersectoral collaboration.
PubMed ID
17278677 View in PubMed
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Advancing the population health agenda: encouraging the integration of social theory into population health research and practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177868
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Sep-Oct;95(5):392-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katherine L Frohlich
Eric Mykhalovskiy
Fiona Miller
Mark Daniel
Author Affiliation
Groupe de recherche interdisciplinaire en santé (GRIS), Faculté de Médicine, Université de Montréal, QC. katherine.frohlich@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Sep-Oct;95(5):392-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
California
Canada
Humans
Population Dynamics
Public Health
Research
Sociology, Medical
PubMed ID
15490933 View in PubMed
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An exploration of ruling relations and how they organize and regulate nursing education in the high-fidelity patient simulation laboratory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145569
Source
Nurs Inq. 2010 Mar;17(1):58-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Jacqueline Limoges
Author Affiliation
Georgian College, Barrie, ON, Canada. jlimoges@georgianc.on.ca
Source
Nurs Inq. 2010 Mar;17(1):58-64
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods
Faculty, Nursing
Humans
Knowledge
Manikins
Models, Educational
Models, Nursing
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing, Practical - education
Ontario
Philosophy, Nursing
Power (Psychology)
Professional Autonomy
Questionnaires
Sociology, Medical
Students, Nursing - psychology
Abstract
Recently, schools of nursing have adopted the use of high-fidelity human patient simulators in laboratory settings to teach nursing. Although numerous articles document the benefits of teaching undergraduate nursing students in this way, little attention has been paid to the discourses and texts organizing this approach. This institutional ethnography uses the critical feminist sociology of Dorothy E. Smith to examine the literature and interviews with Practical and Bachelor of Science in Nursing students, and their faculty about this experience. The research shows how discourses rationalize and sustain certain processes at the expense of others. For example, ruling discourses such as biomedicine, efficiency, and the relational ontology are activated to construct the simulation lab as part of nursing and nursing education. The analysis also highlights the intended and unintended effects of these discourses on nursing education and discusses how emphasizing nursing knowledges can make the simulation lab a positive place for learning.
PubMed ID
20137031 View in PubMed
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An interprofessional problem-based learning course on rehabilitation issues in HIV.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184218
Source
Med Teach. 2003 Jul;25(4):408-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Patricia Solomon
Penny Salvatori
Dale Guenter
Author Affiliation
McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada. solomon@mcmaster.ca
Source
Med Teach. 2003 Jul;25(4):408-13
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
HIV Infections - rehabilitation
Health Occupations - classification - education
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Ontario
Patient-Centered Care
Problem-Based Learning
Sociology, Medical - education
Students, Health Occupations - classification - psychology
Abstract
This study examined students' perceptions of their learning through participation in an interprofessional problem-based course on rehabilitation and HIV. Students representing five health professions participated in an eight-week tutorial course. Qualitative analysis of journals that the students completed throughout the course, and of interviews of the students at completion of the course, revealed that they valued their learning experience. Students gained an appreciation of the roles of others and developed a sense of confidence through justifying their professional role. Through the interprofessional discussions, students were able to increase the breadth and depth of their learning and also gained a rehabilitation perspective. Learning related to HIV and rehabilitation is ideally suited to an interprofessional, problem-based environment.
PubMed ID
12893553 View in PubMed
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Appealing to the "experience' of the patient in the care of the dying.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230789
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 1989 Jun;11(2):117-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
A. Peräkylä
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 1989 Jun;11(2):117-34
Date
Jun-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Death
Data Collection
Finland
Hospitalization
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Patient Relations
Research
Sick Role
Sociology, Medical
Terminal Care - psychology
Abstract
The care of dying patients in hospital is characterized by the copresence of four different frames: practical, medical, lay and psychological. Within the psychological frame, the staff define the patient as an experiencing subject, exposed to the staff members' knowledge and involvement. The psychological frame is used in two different circumstances. First, it is used by the staff members when the patient deviates from an expected identity within some other frame. The deviation creates a threat to the working conditions and moral order at the ward. The threat is managed through a shift into the psychological frame. Second, the psychological frame is used spontaneously in the accounts of their work given by staff members to the sociological field researcher. The image of care associated with the field researcher is characterized by a special awareness of the psychological issues. Thus the field researcher is inevitably a part of the functioning of the new kind of surveillance working through the psychological frame.
PubMed ID
10294547 View in PubMed
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Ascribing emotion to reasonable use in accelerated cancer services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107505
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2013;27(4):432-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anne Roelsgaard Obling
Author Affiliation
Department of Organization, Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2013;27(4):432-48
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Breast Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Cancer Care Facilities - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Denmark
Emotions
Female
Health Care Reform - organization & administration - standards - trends
Hospitals, Public - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Hospitals, Teaching - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Middle Aged
Physician-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Sociology, Medical
Abstract
A recurrent theme in medical sociology has been the juxtaposition of emotion with scientific rationality in the delivery of health care services. However, apart from addressing this juxtaposition very little is said about the complex intertwinement of "emotional" and "rational" practices which makes up professionals' own day-to-day work experiences - and how these experiences are influenced by present ways of organising health care. This paper aims to explore the ways that hospital doctors relate emotions to their understanding of professional medical work and how they respond to recent organisational changes within the field.
Drawing upon a small series of semi-structured interviews (n = 14) with doctors from a public teaching hospital in Denmark, the paper adopts a constructivist framework to analyse personal biographies of health professionals' working lives.
The doctors represented rich accounts of professional medical work, which includes an understanding of what a doctor should feel and how he/she should make him/herself emotionally available to others. However, the impetus for making this appearance was not left unaffected by recent new public management reforms and attempts to accelerate the delivery of services.
The organisation of cancer services into a work system, which consists of a set of tasks broken down into narrow jobs, underestimates the emotional components of patient-doctor encounters. This makes the creation and maintenance of a genuine patient-doctor relationship difficult and the result is feelings of a failed encounter on behalf of the doctor.
The paper suggests that recent rearrangements of cancer services complicate doctors' ability to incorporate emotion into a stream of medical care in a "rational" way. This is shown to challenge their professional ethos and the forms emotional engagement takes in medical practice.
PubMed ID
24003631 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of pharmacy students towards psychosocial factors in health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243761
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1982;16(12):1239-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
H. Hatoum
M C Smith
T R Sharpe
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1982;16(12):1239-41
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Psychology, Social
Sociology, Medical
Students, Pharmacy - psychology
Abstract
An attitude scale was administered on a cross-sectional basis to pharmacy students in 3 professional years and alumni 1 year post-graduation. The instrument, previously used in a study of social awareness among Canadian health professional students, revealed, on application, that social attitudes tended to decline as students progressed through school. Students with prior degrees had generally higher scores. Male students generally held stronger views than did female students, whether favorable or unfavorable.
PubMed ID
6981204 View in PubMed
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Barriers to adequate care for mentally ill people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241018
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1984;18(3):237-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
A H Leighton
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1984;18(3):237-41
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Budgets
Community Mental Health Services - supply & distribution
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Mental disorders
Nova Scotia
Public Opinion
Sociology, Medical
Abstract
A serious and chronic problem that confronts mentally ill people and mental health professionals is the inability of society to provide the requisite resources for adequate care-giving systems. This difficulty has been evident for almost two hundred years. The present paper summarizes the major causal processes as these were revealed in the course of a case study of a mental health centre and its catchment area in Nova Scotia. These barriers to adequate care systems are then considered in historical perspective in order to illustrate how they function more generally. The historical perspective reveals a further handicap in the fact that experiences gained in one reform movement are not transmitted and utilized in subsequent efforts.
PubMed ID
6701568 View in PubMed
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Bereaved parents' experience of research participation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30657
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2004 Jan;58(2):391-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Kari Dyregrov
Author Affiliation
Center for Crisis Psychology, Fabrikkgt.5, 5059 Bergen, Norway. kari@krisepsyk.no
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2004 Jan;58(2):391-400
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude
Bereavement
Child
Child, Preschool
Ethics, Research
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Parents - psychology
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Subjects - psychology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sociology, Medical - methods
Sudden Infant Death
Suicide - psychology
Abstract
Despite the ethical codes guiding bereavement research, few studies have been conducted to evaluate the perceived stress experienced by the bereaved, and to explore which methodologies cause least distress. This article investigates how bereaved and traumatised populations experience research participation, and they voice their recommendations for future research. The data are from a nationwide three-phase study in Norway among parents who had lost their child by suicide, SIDS, and accidents between July 1, 1997 and December 31, 1998. Whereas the first phase reported quantitative results of perceived psychosocial health and focused on offered and ideal support (N=262), the second phase investigated the same issues through in-depth interviews of a sub sample (N=69). Phase three, reported here, included the responses of 64 parents to a short questionnaire evaluating research participation in the two previous phases. The results show that 100% of the parents experienced participation as "positive"/"very positive", and none regretted participating. They linked the positive experiences to being allowed to tell their complete story, the format of the interview, and a hope that they might help others. Apparently, processes of meaning reconstruction and increased awareness of the bereavement process were facilitated by the interviews. However, three-quarters of the interviewees reported that it was to a greater or lesser degree painful to talk about the traumatic loss. Regression analysis showed that being a woman and high levels of psychic distress were the most important predictors of a painful interview experience. In order to protect bereaved and vulnerable populations from harm, already existing ethical codes must be strictly applied, and the researchers must listen respectfully to recommendations from bereaved parents.
PubMed ID
14604624 View in PubMed
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Birds of a feather flock together--and fall ill? Migrant homophily and health in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97223
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2010 Mar;32(3):382-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Mikael Rostila
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Sveaplan, Stockholm, Sweden. mikael.rostila@chess.su.se
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2010 Mar;32(3):382-99
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Health Behavior
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prejudice
Social Environment
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Sociology, Medical
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although studies show that health inequities between ethnic groups exist, few have expressed interest in the origins of these disparities. As homophily (the phenomenon that people principally form relationships with those who are similar to them) influences people's norms and interactions, it might be an important property of migrants' networks, and have implications on their health. The aim of this study is to examine health inequities between natives and immigrants in Sweden and the health consequences arising from participation in homogenous migrant networks. Using total population registers and representative survey data initial analyses show that migrants experience poorer health than native Swedes. The findings further suggest that homophily is a prominent feature of migrant social networks and that migrants in networks with a high proportion of other migrants experience poorer health than those who include a high proportion of natives in their networks. However, unhealthy behaviour and disadvantaged social conditions may account for a considerable share of their excess risk. Hence, network closure may reinforce and maintain norms leading to negative behaviour and social conditions in such networks.
PubMed ID
20415788 View in PubMed
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124 records – page 1 of 13.