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Alcohol-induced psychotic disorder and delirium in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141116
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;197(3):200-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Jonna Perälä
Kimmo Kuoppasalmi
Sami Pirkola
Tommi Härkänen
Samuli Saarni
Annamari Tuulio-Henriksson
Satu Viertiö
Antti Latvala
Seppo Koskinen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Jaana Suvisaari
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Helsinki, Finland. jonna.perala@thl.fi
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;197(3):200-6
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium - epidemiology - therapy
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Ambulatory Care
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Epidemiologic Methods
Family Health
Fathers - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hallucinations - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Psychoses, Alcoholic - epidemiology - therapy
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Epidemiological data on alcohol-induced psychotic disorder and delirium (alcohol-induced psychotic syndrome, AIPS) are scarce.
To investigate the epidemiology of AIPS, the risk factors for developing AIPS among people with alcohol dependence, and mortality associated with alcohol dependence with or without AIPS, in a sample drawn from the general population of Finland.
A general population sample of 8028 persons were interviewed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and screened for psychotic disorders using multiple sources. Best-estimate diagnoses of psychotic disorders were made using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders and case notes. Data on hospital reatments and deaths were collected from national registers.
The lifetime prevalence was 0.5% for AIPS and was highest (1.8%) among men of working age. Younger age at onset of alcohol dependence, low socioeconomic status, father's mental health or alcohol problems and multiple hospital treatments were associated with increased risk of AIPS. Participants with a history of AIPS had considerable medical comorbidity, and 37% of them died during the 8-year follow-up.
Alcohol-induced psychotic disorder is a severe mental disorder with poor outcome.
PubMed ID
20807964 View in PubMed
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The association between discrimination and health: findings on Russian, Somali and Kurdish origin populations in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300351
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 10 01; 28(5):898-903
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
Shadia Rask
Irma T Elo
Seppo Koskinen
Eero Lilja
Päivikki Koponen
Anu E Castaneda
Author Affiliation
Department of Welfare, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 10 01; 28(5):898-903
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Middle East - ethnology
Minority Groups - statistics & numerical data
Russia - ethnology
Social Discrimination - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Somalia - ethnology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The Second European Union Minorities and Discrimination Survey recently demonstrated widespread discrimination across EU countries, with high discrimination rates observed in countries like Finland. Discrimination is known to negatively impact health, but fewer studies have examined how different types of perceived discrimination are related to health.
This study examines (i) the prevalence of different types of perceived discrimination among Russian, Somali and Kurdish origin populations in Finland, and (ii) the association between different types of perceived discrimination (no experiences; subtle discrimination only; overt or subtle and overt discrimination) and health (self-rated health; limiting long-term illness (LLTI) or disability; mental health symptoms). Data are from the Finnish Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study (n = 1795). Subtle discrimination implies reporting being treated with less courtesy and/or treated with less respect than others, and overt discrimination being called names or insulted and/or threatened or harassed. The prevalence of discrimination and the associations between discrimination and health were calculated with predicted margins and logistic regression.
Experiences of subtle discrimination were more common than overt discrimination in all the studied groups. Subtle discrimination was reported by 29% of Somali origin persons and 35% Russian and Kurdish origin persons. The prevalence of overt discrimination ranged between 22% and 24%. Experiences of discrimination increased the odds for poor self-reported health, LLTI and mental health symptoms, particularly among those reporting subtle discrimination only.
To promote the health of diverse populations, actions against racism and discrimination are highly needed, including initiatives that promote shared belonging.
PubMed ID
29878120 View in PubMed
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The association of social support at work and in private life with mental health and antidepressant use: the Health 2000 Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155538
Source
J Affect Disord. 2009 May;115(1-2):36-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Marjo Sinokki
Katariina Hinkka
Kirsi Ahola
Seppo Koskinen
Mika Kivimäki
Teija Honkonen
Pauli Puukka
Timo Klaukka
Jouko Lönnqvist
Marianna Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Lemminkäisenkatu 14-18 B, FI-20520 Turku, Finland. marjo.sinokki@utu.fi
Source
J Affect Disord. 2009 May;115(1-2):36-45
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
Social support is assumed to protect mental health, but it is not known whether low social support at work increases the risk of common mental disorders or antidepressant medication. This study, carried out in Finland 2000-2003, examined the associations of low social support at work and in private life with DSM-IV depressive and anxiety disorders and subsequent antidepressant medication.
Social support was measured with self-assessment scales in a cohort of 3429 employees from a population-based health survey. A 12-month prevalence of depressive or anxiety disorders was examined with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), which encompasses operationalized criteria for DSM-IV diagnoses and allows the estimation of DSM-IV diagnoses for major mental disorders. Purchases of antidepressants in a 3-year follow-up were collected from the nationwide pharmaceutical register of the Social Insurance Institution.
Low social support at work and in private life was associated with a 12-month prevalence of depressive or anxiety disorders (adjusted odds ratio 2.02, 95% CI 1.48-2.82 for supervisory support, 1.65, 95% CI 1.05-2.59 for colleague support, and 1.62, 95% CI 1.12-2.36 for private life support). Work-related social support was also associated with subsequent antidepressant use.
This study used a cross-sectional analysis of DSM-IV mental disorders. The use of purchases of antidepressant as an indicator of depressive and anxiety disorders can result in an underestimation of the actual mental disorders.
Low social support, both at work and in private life, is associated with DSM-IV mental disorders, and low social support at work is also a risk factor for mental disorders treated with antidepressant medication.
PubMed ID
18722019 View in PubMed
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The contribution of childhood circumstances, current circumstances and health behaviour to educational health differences in early adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150717
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:164
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Laura Kestilä
Tuija Martelin
Ossi Rahkonen
Tommi Härkänen
Seppo Koskinen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Division of Welfare and Health Policies, Living conditions, Health and Wellbeing Unit, Helsinki, Finland. laura.kestila@thl.fi
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:164
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Obesity
Parents
Retrospective Studies
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The life course approach emphasises the contribution of circumstances in childhood and youth to adult health inequalities. However, there is still a lot to know of the contribution of living conditions in childhood and youth to adult health inequalities and how later environmental and behavioural factors are connected with the effects of earlier circumstances. This study aims to assess a) how much childhood circumstances, current circumstances and health behaviour contribute to educational health differences and b) to which extent the effect of childhood circumstances on educational health differences is shared with the effects of later living conditions and health behaviour in young adults.
The data derived from the Health 2000 Survey represent the Finnish young adults aged 18-29 in 2000. The analyses were carried out on 68% (n = 1282) of the sample (N = 1894). The cross-sectional data based on interviews and questionnaires include retrospective information on childhood circumstances. The outcome measure was poor self-rated health.
Poor self-rated health was much more common among subjects with primary education only than among those in the highest educational category (OR 4.69, 95% CI 2.63 to 8.62). Childhood circumstances contributed substantially (24%) to the health differences between these educational groups. Nearly two thirds (63%) of this contribution was shared with behavioural factors adopted by early adulthood, and 17% with current circumstances. Health behaviours, smoking especially, were strongly contributed to educational health differences.
To develop means for avoiding undesirable trajectories along which poor health and health differences develop, it is necessary to understand the pathways to health inequalities and know how to improve the living conditions of families with children.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19476659 View in PubMed
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Determinants of health in early adulthood: what is the role of parental education, childhood adversities and own education?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173037
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2006 Jun;16(3):306-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Laura Kestilä
Seppo Koskinen
Tuija Martelin
Ossi Rahkonen
Tiina Pensola
Hillevi Aro
Arpo Aromaa
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute (KTL), Department of Health and Functional Capacity, Helsinki, Finland. laura.kestila@ktl.fi
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2006 Jun;16(3):306-15
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Education
Family
Female
Finland
Health status
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Life Change Events
Logistic Models
Male
Mental health
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parents
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Of the many studies assessing the impact of childhood living conditions on health and health inequalities in adulthood, only few have combined information on current determinants of health with detailed individual level data on different aspects of childhood living conditions and adversities. This study aims (i) to assess the role of parental education, self-reported childhood adversities and family structure as determinants of different dimensions of health in early adulthood, and (ii) to identify the role of the respondent's own education as a modifier of the association between childhood living conditions and health.
The study is based on a representative sample (n = 3669; participation rate 83%) of young adults aged 18-39 years in 2000 in Finland. The main outcome measures were poor self-rated health (SRH), psychological distress (by GHQ12) and somatic morbidity.
Parental education, problems in childhood and the respondent's own education were independently related to SRH and psychological distress. The impact of childhood living conditions on health varied by gender and according to the measure of health. Childhood conditions were strongly associated with poor SRH and psychological distress, whereas the connection with somatic morbidity was weaker. The associations remained relatively unchanged after controlling for the respondent's own education.
Childhood living conditions and adversities are strongly associated with poor SRH and psychological distress in early adulthood. Early recognition of childhood adversities followed by relevant support measures may play an important role in preventing health problems in adulthood.
PubMed ID
16141301 View in PubMed
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Differences in mortality by marital status in Finland from 1976 to 2000: analyses of changes in marital-status distributions, socio-demographic and household composition, and cause of death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175751
Source
Popul Stud (Camb). 2005 Mar;59(1):99-115
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Pekka Martikainen
Tuija Martelin
Elina Nihtilä
Karoliina Majamaa
Seppo Koskinen
Author Affiliation
Population Research Unit, Department of Sociology, University of Helsinki, Finland. pekka.martikainen@helsinki.fi
Source
Popul Stud (Camb). 2005 Mar;59(1):99-115
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Being currently not married is more common today than 25 years ago. Over this period relative differences in mortality by marital status have increased in several countries, mainly as a result of a sharp decline in mortality among the married. Using Finnish census data linked with death certificates, we show that these increases are not explained by the non-married population becoming more marginalized in socio-economic status or household composition. However, the increases in marital-status differences in mortality from accidental, violent, and alcohol-related causes of death in the 30-64 age group indicate that changes in the health-related behaviour of the non-married population may play a role. The public-health burden associated with not being married has also grown. At the end of the 1990s about 15 per cent of all deaths above the age of 30 would not have occurred if the non-married population had had the same age-specific mortality rates as the married population.
PubMed ID
15764137 View in PubMed
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Differences in older adults' use of primary and specialist care services in two Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70856
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2004 Dec;14(4):375-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Anna Liisa Suominen-Taipale
Seppo Koskinen
Tuija Martelin
Jostein Holmen
Roar Johnsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. liisa.suominen-taipale@ktl.fi
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2004 Dec;14(4):375-80
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services for the Aged - utilization
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - utilization
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Specialties, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to compare elderly persons' self-reported use of physician services and associated sociodemographic factors and self-rated health in two Nordic countries with different health care systems, Finland and Norway. METHODS: Population based, cross-sectional surveys conducted in Norway (1995-97) and in Finland (1997) were employed. In the Norwegian data a total of 7,919 individuals, and in the Finnish data 1, 500 individuals, aged 65-74 years old were included in the samples. The outcome variables were having visited a general practitioner, a specialist or both during the past 12 months. Associations between utilization of physician's services and sociodemographic factors and self-rated health were analysed by multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: Approximately the same proportion of elderly in Norway and Finland reported having visited a physician during the previous 12 months. Finnish elderly more often visited a specialist compared to Norwegians. Self-rated health was strongly associated with visits to a specialist in both countries and to a GP in Norway. In Finland visits to a GP were only weakly connected with self-rated health. The use of specialist services increased with increasing education in both countries and in Finland the association was steeper than in Norway. Marital status was not consistently associated with visiting a physician. CONCLUSIONS: Higher rates of specialist care among the elderly in Finland may indicate a more efficient gate-keeping role among Norwegian general practitioners or inducement caused by two overlapping service sectors. Inconsistent associations between utilization and health variables may be due to cultural differences.
PubMed ID
15542872 View in PubMed
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Do childhood social circumstances affect overweight and obesity in early adulthood?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153186
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 Mar;37(2):206-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Laura Kestilä
Ossi Rahkonen
Tuija Martelin
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Seppo Koskinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Functional Capacity, National Public Health Institute (KTL), Helsinki, Finland. laura.kestila@ktl.fi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 Mar;37(2):206-19
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Overweight - epidemiology - etiology
Parents - psychology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine the association of childhood circumstances with overweight and obesity in early adulthood, to analyse whether the respondent's education and current circumstances mediate these associations, and to explore whether the respondent's health behaviour affects these associations.
This was a cross-sectional study with retrospective inquiries.
The study was based on a representative two-stage cluster sample (N= 1894, participation rate 79%) of young adults aged 18-29 years in Finland in 2000. The outcome measure was three-class body mass index (BMI) (normal weight, overweight, and obesity). Multinomial logistic regression was used as the main statistical tool.
In women, childhood circumstances (low parental education (relative risk ratio (RRR) = 2.43), parental unemployment (RRR= 2.09) and single-parent family (RRR= 1.99)) increased the risk of overweight (25 or = 30) in women in the age-adjusted models, and being bullied at school remained a significant predictor after adjusting for all childhood and current determinants. In both genders, the strong association between parental education and obesity remained significant after adjusting for all other determinants (for the lowest educational category, RRR= 3.56 in women, and RRR= 6.55 in men).
Childhood factors predict overweight and obesity in early adulthood. This effect is stronger on obesity than on overweight and in women than in men, and it seems to be partly mediated by adult circumstances. The results emphasize the lasting effect of childhood socioeconomic position on adult obesity. When preventive policies are being planned, social circumstances in childhood should be addressed.
PubMed ID
19141544 View in PubMed
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The ethnic gap in mental health: A population-based study of Russian, Somali and Kurdish origin migrants in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275748
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2016 May;44(3):281-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Shadia Rask
Jaana Suvisaari
Seppo Koskinen
Päivikki Koponen
Mulki Mölsä
Riikka Lehtisalo
Carla Schubert
Antti Pakaslahti
Anu Emilia Castaneda
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2016 May;44(3):281-90
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - ethnology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Iran - ethnology
Iraq - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Russia - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Somalia - ethnology
Transients and Migrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Research demonstrates that migrants are more vulnerable to poor mental health than general populations, but population-based studies with distinct migrant groups are scarce. We aim to (1) assess the prevalence of mental health symptoms in Russian, Somali and Kurdish origin migrants in Finland; (2) compare the prevalence of mental health symptoms in these migrant groups to the Finnish population; (3) determine which socio-demographic factors are associated with mental health symptoms.
We used data from the Finnish Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study and Health 2011 Survey. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25), and 1.75 was used as cut-off for clinically significant symptoms. Somatization was measured using the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) somatization scale. The age-adjusted prevalence of mental health symptoms in the studied groups was calculated by gender using predicted margins. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine which socio-demographic factors are associated with mental health symptoms in the studied population groups.
The prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms was higher in Russian women (24%) and Kurdish men (23%) and women (49%) than in the Finnish population (9-10%). These differences were statistically significant (p
PubMed ID
26647096 View in PubMed
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Explaining educational differences in sickness absence: a population-based follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271547
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2015 Jul;41(4):338-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Risto Kaikkonen
Tommi Härkänen
Ossi Rahkonen
Raija Gould
Seppo Koskinen
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2015 Jul;41(4):338-46
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bayes Theorem
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Sex Distribution
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Workplace
Abstract
There is a marked socioeconomic gradient in sickness absences, but the causes of this gradient are poorly understood. This study examined the role of health and work-related factors as determinants of educational differences in long-term sickness absence in an 8-year follow-up.
The study comprised a population-based sample of 5835 Finns aged 30-64 years (participation 89%, N=3946) in a register-based 8-year follow-up. This is a novel method to predict the population average of sickness absence days per working year (DWY) based on the expected outcome values using Poisson and gamma regression models.
The difference in the DWY between the lowest and highest educational level was clear among both men (3.2 days/year versus 8.0 days/year) and women (women 4.4 days/year versus 10.1 days/year). Adjusting for physical working conditions, health status and health behavior, and obesity attenuated the differences. Psychosocial working conditions had only a minor effect on the association. After adjusting for health and work-related factors, the difference attenuated by 1.8 days and 2.6 days among men and women, respectively.
Our results suggest that improvements in physical working conditions and reducing smoking, particularly among employees with a low level of education, may markedly reduce educational differences in sickness absence.
PubMed ID
25928580 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.