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31 records – page 1 of 4.

Acknowledging the past while looking to the future: conceptualizing indigenous child trauma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117696
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(4):55-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Shanley Swanson Nicolai
Merete Saus
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(4):55-74
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Cultural Characteristics
Cultural Competency
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Intergenerational Relations
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Montana
Norway
Politics
Population Groups - ethnology - psychology
Qualitative Research
Social Work - methods - standards
Stress Disorders, Traumatic - ethnology
Abstract
Trauma affects children from all ethnicities, nationalities and socioeconomic backgrounds. However, indigenous children may experience trauma differently than their majority population peers due to traumatic histories of colonization and marginalization. This article reports on an exploratory qualitative study of how service providers in Western Montana and Northern Norway conceptualize Native American and Sámi children's experiences of trauma today. Findings reveal that participants relate current trauma experiences of indigenous youth to historical and intergenerational traumas.
PubMed ID
24851475 View in PubMed
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Adapting to the context and learning from earlier experience: the implementation of a national breakthrough collaborative in the context of social services in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147789
Source
Qual Manag Health Care. 2009 Oct-Dec;18(4):231-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Josephine Lindgren
Author Affiliation
Medical Management Centre, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management & Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. josephine.lindgren@skl.se
Source
Qual Manag Health Care. 2009 Oct-Dec;18(4):231-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - rehabilitation
Child, Preschool
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Learning
Organizational Case Studies
Pilot Projects
Program Development
Social Work - methods - organization & administration
Sweden
Abstract
Although often used in health care settings as a method for continuous quality improvement, experience with the breakthrough collaborative in nonclinical health care settings is limited. In this article, we report pilot data from a social services collaborative conducted in 2007 to 2009 in Sweden, with special attention given to features of the implementation context that appeared to facilitate or hinder its success.
We used a case study approach to describe the processes used in the pilot project as well as to characterize the context. Our analysis was guided by a framework consisting of earlier identified factors for success including "motivate and empower the teams" and "ensure teams have measurable and achievable targets."
We observed several context-specific factors. These included measuring challenges connected to large cooperating teams. Specifically, teams representing different organizations needed more time to carry out a breakthrough collaborative than those in clinical health care settings. As in breakthrough collaboratives conducted in health care settings, early measurement efforts enabled a clearer sense of direction, which may have served to reinforce motivation among team members. This study highlights features that may have universal importance in influencing the success of breakthrough collaboratives to improve the quality of social services.
PubMed ID
19851230 View in PubMed
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Africentric youth and family rites of passage program: promoting resilience among at-risk African American youths.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181524
Source
Soc Work. 2004 Jan;49(1):65-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Aminifu R Harvey
Robert B Hill
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University of Maryland at Baltimore, 21201-1777, USA. Aharvey@ssw.umaryland.edu
Source
Soc Work. 2004 Jan;49(1):65-74
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
African Americans - psychology
Ceremonial Behavior
Child
District of Columbia
Family Therapy
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - rehabilitation
Male
Program Evaluation
Social Identification
Social Work - methods
Abstract
This article examines the effects of an Africentric youth and family rites of passage program on at-risk African American youths and their parents. Data were obtained from a three-year evaluation of a youth rites of passage demonstration project using therapeutic interventions based on Africentric principles. At-risk African American boys between ages 11.5 and 14.5 years with no history of substance abuse were referred from the criminal justice system, diversion programs, and local schools. The evaluation revealed that participating youths exhibited gains in self-esteem and accurate knowledge of the dangers of drug abuse. Although the differences were not statistically significant, parents demonstrated improvements in parenting skills, racial identity, cultural awareness, and community involvement. Evidence from interviews and focus groups suggests that the program's holistic, family-oriented, Africentric, strengths-based approach and indigenous staff contributed to its success.
PubMed ID
14964519 View in PubMed
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Between empowerment and powerlessness: separated minors in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123527
Source
New Dir Child Adolesc Dev. 2012;2012(136):65-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Kristina Gustafsson
Ingrid Fioretos
Eva Norström
Author Affiliation
Institution of Arts and Cultural Sciences, Division of Ethnology, Lund University, Sweden. Kristina.Gustafsson@kultur.lu.se
Source
New Dir Child Adolesc Dev. 2012;2012(136):65-77
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Dislocations
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
International Cooperation
Interviews as Topic
Male
Minors - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Parent-Child Relations
Power (Psychology)
Questionnaires
Refugees - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Social Isolation - psychology
Social Support
Social Work - methods - standards
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival - psychology
Sweden
Transients and Migrants - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
United Nations
Abstract
This article analyzes the migration experiences of thirteen separated minors who arrived in Sweden between 1943 and 2008. Using the framework of "dislocation" and the "liberated self," this chapter shows that the experiences of separated minors are shaped in the intersection between contexts and conditions of transnational migration and the Swedish reception system. Their efforts to continue living based on the past and building a new life during a period of transition between different countries and between childhood and adulthood can be described as "a life on hold." The paradox that migration serves simultaneously to empower and render children powerless is discussed.
PubMed ID
22689524 View in PubMed
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Challenges for social work in hemophilia care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180000
Source
Health Soc Work. 2004 May;29(2):149-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Gregory Taylor
Author Affiliation
Hemophilia Program, Vancouver General Hospital, Mary Pack Arthritis Centre Site, 895 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1LZ. grtaylor@vanhosp.bc.ca
Source
Health Soc Work. 2004 May;29(2):149-52
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Counseling
Decision Making
Female
HIV Infections - blood - transmission
Hemophilia A - blood - psychology - therapy
Hepatitis C - blood - transmission
Humans
Male
Social Work - methods
PubMed ID
15156848 View in PubMed
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The Characteristics of Local Support Systems, and the Roles of Professionals, in Supporting Families where a Mother has an Intellectual Disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279031
Source
J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2016 May;29(3):197-210
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Ingrid Weiber
Mona Eklund
Per-Anders Tengland
Source
J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2016 May;29(3):197-210
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Humans
Intellectual Disability - rehabilitation
Mothers
Qualitative Research
Social Work - methods
Social workers
Sweden
Abstract
There might be a need for support for families where the mother has an intellectual disability, in order to counteract the effects of potential parental inadequacy and other detrimental aspects of the family situation. The purpose of this study was to describe how professionals characterized such support and the collaboration required.
Focus group interviews involving 29 professionals were conducted and analysed using content analysis.
Five themes were identified: The roles and activities of the professionals involved; ways in which needs of support are identified; problems in identifying mothers with an intellectual disability; how professionals coordinate their support and work together; and the dilemma concerning legislative actions.
By identifying both fruitful and problematic aspects of professional support, the findings may be used to enhance future support. More efficient chains of information and improved inter-sector collaboration between professions may further enhance the support practices.
PubMed ID
25754531 View in PubMed
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Clinical routines and management of suspected child abuse or neglect in public dental service in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124209
Source
Swed Dent J. 2012;36(1):15-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Therese Kvist
Fredrik Malmberg
Anna-Karin Boovist
Hanna Larheden
Göran Dahllöf
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Pediatric Dentistry, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. therese.kvist@ki.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2012;36(1):15-24
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appointments and Schedules
Child
Child Abuse - diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Child Welfare
Dental Health Services - organization & administration
Government Agencies
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Mandatory Reporting
Patient Advocacy
Public Sector
Questionnaires
Social Work - methods
Sweden
Abstract
Mandatory reporting to the social services is required by dental professionals when suspicion of child abuse or neglect occurs. The objective of this study was to analyze the recommendations previously made by the Ombudsman for Children in Sweden. The aim was to study the association between having guidelines and the inclination to report to the social services and also the association between management of multiple missed appointmens and reports to the social service. A web-based questionnaire was sent to the clinical department heads (CDH) of all PDS in Sweden, distributed and authorized by The Ombudsman for Children in Sweden. The response frequency was 95% and all county councils of Sweden were represented. The results showed regional differences regarding management of suspected child abuse, neglect and dental neglect. Clinical department heads that had reported to the social services more often had guidelines on child abuse and neglect (p
PubMed ID
22611901 View in PubMed
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Comparing differential responses within child protective services: a longitudinal examination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140080
Source
Child Welfare. 2010;89(3):57-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Sheila K Marshall
Grant Charles
Kristin Kendrick
Vilmante Pakalniskiene
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia.
Source
Child Welfare. 2010;89(3):57-77
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control
Family Health
Humans
Program Evaluation
Recurrence
Social Support
Social Work - methods - organization & administration
Abstract
This study examines the efficacy of a family differential response program to lower rates of (1) reentry into child protective services (CPS) and (2) child removal. Data were collected over 20 months from one region of British Columbia, Canada. Comparisons between family development response (FDR) and cases assigned to regular investigation (INV) suggest that FDR does not decrease recidivism to CPS. However, fewer children in the FDR group were removed than children in the INV group.
PubMed ID
20945805 View in PubMed
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The development of child protection supervisors in Northern British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117692
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(5):87-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Karen Blackman
Glen Schmidt
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(5):87-105
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Child
Child Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Focus Groups
Humans
Inservice Training - methods - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic
Leadership
Mentors - statistics & numerical data
Professional Competence - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Social Work - methods - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This research involved three different groups of employees in a provincial government organization responsible for the delivery of child welfare services throughout northern British Columbia. The research sought to understand the skills that are most important to supervision, how the skills can be developed, and the barriers that might impede this development.
PubMed ID
24923136 View in PubMed
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Don't ask don't tell: Battered Women living in Sweden encounter with healthcare personnel and their experience of the care given.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256803
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:23166
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Darcia Pratt-Eriksson
Ingegerd Bergbom
Elisabeth D Lyckhage
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden; Stockholmdarcia.pratteriksson@karolinska.se.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:23166
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Battered Women - psychology
Empathy - physiology
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Police
Professional-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Social Work - methods
Spouse Abuse - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
In recent years there has been increased intimate partner violence (IPV) toward women. Research on the care provided to victims of IPV is limited. The purpose of the study was to gain a deeper understanding of women's lived experience of IPV and their encounters with healthcare professionals, social workers, and the police following IPV. A phenomenological hermeneutic method inspired by the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur was used. The method is based on text interpretation and gives voice to women's lived experience. Twelve women living at a women's shelter in Sweden narrated their IPV experiences. The study revealed that the women experienced retraumatization, uncaring behaviors, and unendurable suffering during their encounter with healthcare professionals. They were disappointed, dismayed, and saddened by the lack of support, care, and empathy. Nurses and other healthcare professionals must understand and detect signs of IPV as well as provide adequate care, as these women are vulnerable. IPV victims need to feel that they can trust healthcare professionals. Lack of trust can lead to less women reporting IPV and seeking help.
Notes
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Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2003 Aug;18(8):617-2312911643
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Cites: J Interpers Violence. 2008 Jun;23(6):834-5218292404
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Dec;22(4):643-5218803604
PubMed ID
24576461 View in PubMed
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31 records – page 1 of 4.