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Acculturation and sexual function in Canadian East Asian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166675
Source
J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):72-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Lori A Brotto
Jane S T Woo
Andrew G Ryder
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Obstetrics/Gynaecology, Vancouver, BC, Canada. lori.brotto@vch.ca
Source
J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):72-82
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of considering acculturation when investigating the sexuality of East Asian women in North America. Moreover, bidimensional assessment of both heritage and mainstream cultural affiliations provides significantly more information about sexual attitudes than simple unidimensional measures, such as length of residency in the Western culture.
The goal of this study was to extend the findings in women to a sample of East Asian men.
Self-report measures of sexual behaviors, sexual responses, and sexual satisfaction.
Euro-Canadian (N = 124) and East Asian (N = 137) male university students privately completed a battery of questionnaires in exchange for course credit. Results. Group comparisons revealed East Asian men to have significantly lower liberal sexual attitudes and experiences, and a significantly lower proportion had engaged in sexual intercourse compared with the Euro-Canadian sample. In addition, the East Asian men had significantly higher Impotence and Avoidance subscale scores on the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction, a measure of sexual dysfunction. Focusing on East Asian men alone, mainstream acculturation, but not length of residency in Canada, was significantly related to sexual attitudes, experiences, and responses.
Overall, these data replicate the findings in women and suggest that specific acculturation effects over and above length of residency should be included in the cultural assessment of men's sexual health.
PubMed ID
17087799 View in PubMed
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Relationships between culture and health status: a multi-site study of the older Chinese in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159053
Source
Can J Aging. 2007;26(3):171-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Daniel W L Lai
Ka Tat Tsang
Neena Chappell
David C Y Lai
Shirley B Y Chau
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. dlai@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2007;26(3):171-83
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Poverty
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Social Support
Social Values - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study examined the relationships between culture and the health status of older Chinese in Canada. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews with a cross-sectional, randomly selected sample of 2,272 older Chinese between 55 and 101 years of age in seven Canadian cities. Health status was assessed by the number of chronic illnesses, by limitations in ADL and IADL, and by information on the Medical Outcome Study Short Form SF-36. Although cultural variables explained only a small proportion of variance in health status, having a stronger level of identification with traditional Chinese health beliefs was significant in predicting physical health, number of illnesses, and limitations on IADL. Other cultural variables, including religion, country of origin, and length of residence in Canada, were also significant in predicting some health variables. Interventions to improve health should focus on strategies to enhance cultural compatibility between users and the health delivery system.
PubMed ID
18238724 View in PubMed
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