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Acculturation and sexual function in Asian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171478
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Lori A Brotto
Heather M Chik
Andrew G Ryder
Boris B Gorzalka
Brooke N Seal
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics & Gyneacology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Lori.Brotto@vch.ca
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Cultural effects on sexuality are pervasive and potentially of great clinical importance, but have not yet received sustained empirical attention. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of acculturation on sexual permissiveness and sexual function, with a particular focus on arousal in Asian women living in Canada. We also compared questionnaire responses between Asian and Euro-Canadian groups in hopes of investigating whether acculturation captured unique information not predicted by ethnic group affiliation. Euro-Canadian (n = 173) and Asian (n = 176) female university students completed a battery of questionnaires in private. Euro-Canadian women had significantly more sexual knowledge and experiences, more liberal attitudes, and higher rates of desire, arousal, sexual receptivity, and sexual pleasure. Anxiety from anticipated sexual activity was significantly higher in Asian women, but the groups did not differ significantly on relationship satisfaction or problems with sexual function. Acculturation to Western culture, as well as maintained affiliation with traditional Asian heritage, were both significantly and independently related to sexual attitudes above and beyond length of residency in Canada, and beyond ethnic group comparisons. Overall, these data suggest that measurement of acculturation may capture information about an individual's unique acculturation pattern that is not evident when focusing solely on ethnic group comparisons or length of residency, and that such findings may be important in facilitating the assessment, classification, and treatment of sexual difficulties in Asian women.
PubMed ID
16362246 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and sexual function in Canadian East Asian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166675
Source
J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):72-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Lori A Brotto
Jane S T Woo
Andrew G Ryder
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Obstetrics/Gynaecology, Vancouver, BC, Canada. lori.brotto@vch.ca
Source
J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):72-82
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of considering acculturation when investigating the sexuality of East Asian women in North America. Moreover, bidimensional assessment of both heritage and mainstream cultural affiliations provides significantly more information about sexual attitudes than simple unidimensional measures, such as length of residency in the Western culture.
The goal of this study was to extend the findings in women to a sample of East Asian men.
Self-report measures of sexual behaviors, sexual responses, and sexual satisfaction.
Euro-Canadian (N = 124) and East Asian (N = 137) male university students privately completed a battery of questionnaires in exchange for course credit. Results. Group comparisons revealed East Asian men to have significantly lower liberal sexual attitudes and experiences, and a significantly lower proportion had engaged in sexual intercourse compared with the Euro-Canadian sample. In addition, the East Asian men had significantly higher Impotence and Avoidance subscale scores on the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction, a measure of sexual dysfunction. Focusing on East Asian men alone, mainstream acculturation, but not length of residency in Canada, was significantly related to sexual attitudes, experiences, and responses.
Overall, these data replicate the findings in women and suggest that specific acculturation effects over and above length of residency should be included in the cultural assessment of men's sexual health.
PubMed ID
17087799 View in PubMed
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Be known, be available, be mutual: a qualitative ethical analysis of social values in rural palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130916
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2011;12:19
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Barbara Pesut
Joan L Bottorff
Carole A Robinson
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, Canada. barb.pesut@ubc.ca
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2011;12:19
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Ethical Analysis
Health Policy - trends
Health Services Accessibility - ethics - standards - trends
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Palliative Care - ethics - trends
Qualitative Research
Rural Population
Social Values - ethnology
Abstract
Although attention to healthcare ethics in rural areas has increased, specific focus on rural palliative care is still largely under-studied and under-theorized. The purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the values informing good palliative care from rural individuals' perspectives.
We conducted a qualitative ethnographic study in four rural communities in Western Canada. Each community had a population of 10, 000 or less and was located at least a three hour travelling distance by car from a specialist palliative care treatment centre. Data were collected over a 2-year period and included 95 interviews, 51 days of field work and 74 hours of direct participant observation where the researchers accompanied rural healthcare providers. Data were analyzed inductively to identify the most prevalent thematic values, and then coded using NVivo.
This study illuminated the core values of knowing and being known, being present and available, and community and mutuality that provide the foundation for ethically good rural palliative care. These values were congruent across the study communities and across the stakeholders involved in rural palliative care. Although these were highly prized values, each came with a corresponding ethical tension. Being known often resulted in a loss of privacy. Being available and present created a high degree of expectation and potential caregiver strain. The values of community and mutuality created entitlement issues, presenting daunting challenges for coordinated change.
The values identified in this study offer the opportunity to better understand common ethical tensions that arise in rural healthcare and key differences between rural and urban palliative care. In particular, these values shed light on problematic health system and health policy changes. When initiatives violate deeply held values and hard won rural capacity to address the needs of their dying members is undermined, there are long lasting negative consequences. The social fabric of rural life is frayed. These findings offer one way to re-conceptualize healthcare decision making through consideration of critical values to support ethically good palliative care in rural settings.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21955451 View in PubMed
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Canadian-Jewish seniors: marriage/cohabitation after age 65.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152757
Source
J Gerontol Soc Work. 2009 Jan;52(1):32-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Rachel Aber Schlesinger
Benjamin Schlesinger
Author Affiliation
Division of Social Science, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. rachels@yorku.ca
Source
J Gerontol Soc Work. 2009 Jan;52(1):32-47
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Judaism
Male
Marriage - psychology
Ontario
Social Values - ethnology
Abstract
This is an exploratory qualitative study of 10 seniors (5 men and 5 women), who remarried or lived together after the age of 65. They were all Jewish, lived in Toronto, Canada, and had been married previously. The subjects were interviewed in their own homes, using a questionnaire. The study attempts to explore the pathways to recoupling, how the partners met, the differences between the first and second partners, and the major issues faced by the subjects in moving into a new relationship. The results in this article are significantly presented through the words of the respondents. This gives the reader the flavor of what is involved in senior relationships. The conclusions summarize the major findings of the study, and make suggestions for further research. We focus on implications for health and wellbeing from our findings.
PubMed ID
19197628 View in PubMed
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Can dimensions of national culture predict cross-national differences in medical communication?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91236
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2009 Apr;75(1):58-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Meeuwesen Ludwien
van den Brink-Muinen Atie
Hofstede Geert
Author Affiliation
Interdisciplinary Social Science Department, Utrecht University, Research Institute for 'Psychology & Health', P.O. Box 80.140, 3508 TC Utrecht, The Netherlands. l.meeuwesen@uu.nl
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2009 Apr;75(1):58-66
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Male
Physician-Patient Relations
Regression Analysis
Social Behavior
Social Values - ethnology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This study investigated at a country level how cross-national differences in medical communication can be understood from the first four of Hofstede's cultural dimensions, i.e. power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism/collectivism and masculinity/femininity, together with national wealth. METHODS: A total of 307 general practitioners (GPs) and 5820 patients from Belgium, Estonia, Germany, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland participated in the study. Medical communication was videotaped and assessed using Roter's interaction analysis system (RIAS). Additional context information of physicians (gender, job satisfaction, risk-taking and belief of psychological influence on diseases) and patients (gender, health condition, diagnosis and medical encounter expectations) was gathered by using questionnaires. RESULTS: Countries differ considerably form each other in terms of culture dimensions. The larger a nation's power distance, the less room there is for unexpected information exchange and the shorter the consultations are. Roles are clearly described and fixed. The higher the level of uncertainty avoidance, the less attention is given to rapport building, e.g. less eye contact. In 'masculine' countries there is less instrumental communication in the medical interaction, which was contrary to expectations. In wealthy countries, more attention is given to psychosocial communication. CONCLUSION: The four culture dimensions, together with countries' wealth, contribute importantly to the understanding of differences in European countries' styles of medical communication. Their predictive power reaches much further than explanations along the north/south or east/west division of Europe. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The understanding of these cross-national differences is a precondition for the prevention of intercultural miscommunication. Improved understanding may occur at microlevel in the medical encounter, as well as on macrolevel in pursuing more effective cooperation and integration of European health care policies.
PubMed ID
19013047 View in PubMed
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Challenges of transcultural placements: foster parent perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146001
Source
Child Welfare. 2009;88(3):103-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Jason D Brown
David St Arnault
Natalie George
Jennifer Sintzel
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Education, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. jbrow97@uwo.ca
Source
Child Welfare. 2009;88(3):103-26
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Caregivers
Child
Cluster analysis
Cultural Competency
Cultural Diversity
Female
Foster Home Care
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Social Values - ethnology
Abstract
A random sample of licensed foster parents in a central Canadian province was asked, "What are the challenges of fostering children who have different values, beliefs, and traditions than you?" In response to this question, 49 unique responses were made and grouped together by foster parents. Seven themes emerged from the analysis: understanding, respecting, learning, compromising, disagreements, child's feelings, and teaching. Several differences were found between the literature and study participants, suggesting areas worthy of future research.
PubMed ID
20084820 View in PubMed
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Cultural dissimilarity and intermarriage. a longitudinal study of immigrants in Sweden, 1990–2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129785
Source
Int Migr Rev. 2011;45(2):297-324
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Martin Dribe
Christer Lundh
Author Affiliation
Lund University.
Source
Int Migr Rev. 2011;45(2):297-324
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Diversity
Emigrants and Immigrants - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Marriage - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Social Conditions - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Identification
Social Values - ethnology - history
Spouses - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
Intermarriage with natives is a key indicator of immigrant integration. This article studies intermarriage for 138 immigrant groups in Sweden, using longitudinal individual level data. It shows great variation in marriage patterns across immigrant populations, ranging from over 70 percent endogamy in some immigrants groups to below 5 percent in other groups. Although part of this variation is explained by human capital and the structure of the marriage market, cultural factors (values, religion, and language) play an important role as well. Immigrants from culturally more dissimilar countries are less likely to intermarry with natives, and instead more prone to endogamy.
PubMed ID
22069769 View in PubMed
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Culture Connection Project: promoting multiculturalism in elementary schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165322
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jan-Feb;98(1):26-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lucia Yiu Matuk
Tina Ruggirello
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Windsor, ON. lyiu@uwindsor.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jan-Feb;98(1):26-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude - ethnology
Child
Cultural Diversity
Drama
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Prejudice
Problem-Based Learning - methods
Questionnaires
Race Relations - psychology - trends
Schools - organization & administration
Social Change
Social Values - ethnology
Abstract
To promote multiculturalism among grade school students through drama education.
Grade 3-6 students (N = 665) from 6 targeted schools including lead-class students (n = 158) representing each school.
Elementary schools in Windsor-Essex County, Ontario, Canada.
In this non-experimental design study, group discussions conducted with each lead class to explore students' understanding of multiculturalism were developed into an interactive drama performance and performed for all grades 3-6 students in their respective schools. A follow-up drama workshop was offered to each lead class one week after the drama performance. All students completed a 7-item questionnaire before and after the drama performance and after the drama workshop. Pre-test and post-test data collected were analyzed using T-test and ANOVA to determine the effects of drama education on students' attitudes toward multiculturalism.
Statistical analysis at 0.05 significance level revealed that both the performance and the drama workshop heightened students' awareness of racism, and instilled cultural respect through "talking with others", "accepting others", and "believing that they can make a difference" in multiculturalism promotion.
Drama education was an effective experiential tool for promoting multiculturalism in a school setting. The key to promoting inter-racial harmony is to respect and accept individual differences and to broaden the social determinants of health by providing culture safety care.
PubMed ID
17278673 View in PubMed
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Differences in sexual guilt and desire in east Asian and Euro-Canadian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130425
Source
J Sex Res. 2012;49(6):594-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Lori A Brotto
Jane S T Woo
Boris B Gorzalka
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. lori.brotto@vch.ca
Source
J Sex Res. 2012;49(6):594-602
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
British Columbia
Coitus - psychology
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Guilt
Humans
Male
Self Report
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Sexual Partners
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Differences in sexual desire between individuals of East Asian and European descent are well-documented, with East Asian individuals reporting lower sexual desire. The mechanisms that underlie this disparity have received little empirical attention. Recent research has found that sex guilt, "a generalized expectancy for self-mediated punishment for violating or for anticipating violating standards of proper sexual conduct" (Mosher & Cross, 1971 , p. 27), mediates the relationship between culture and sexual desire in East Asian and Euro-Canadian women. The goal of this study was to explore this role of sex guilt in men. Male Euro-Canadian (n = 38) and East Asian (n = 45) university students completed online questionnaires. The East Asian men reported significantly lower sexual desire and significantly higher sex guilt. Sex guilt was a significant mediator of the relationship between ethnicity and sexual desire, as well as a significant mediator between mainstream acculturation and sexual desire. Among the East Asian men, mainstream acculturation was significantly and negatively correlated with sex guilt such that increasing mainstream acculturation was associated with less sex guilt. The diagnostic and clinical implications of the findings are discussed.
PubMed ID
22004159 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.