Skip header and navigation

Refine By

3889 records – page 1 of 389.

A 3-year follow-up study of psychosocial functioning and general symptoms in settled refugees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71526
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2002 Dec;106(6):415-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
B. Lie
Author Affiliation
Psychosocial Centre for Refugees, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. birgit_lie@c2i.net
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2002 Dec;106(6):415-25
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Dissociative Disorders - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Refugees - psychology
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Social Support
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - etiology - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Few community studies have addressed the longitudinal course of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in traumatized refugees in early resettlement. This longitudinal study investigated changes from the first (T1) to the second interview (T2), 3 years later. The relationship between traumatic exposures and psychosocial factors/psychological symptom load were examined. METHOD: Local health professionals performed the interviews, using rating scales and a structured questionnaire. A total of 240 (52%) refugees attended. RESULTS: Unchanged Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 and increase in Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and post-traumatic stress symptoms-16 between T1 and T2 were found, indicating the severity and chronicity of problems. Mean post-traumatic stress score was 15% above cut-off. Severe life-threatening trauma and present life in exile with unemployment and unresolved family reunion were risk factors. CONCLUSION: Early diagnostic interview should be followed by targeted approach. Pinpointing those in need of specialist services is essential. An interdisciplinary approach is necessary in this work.
PubMed ID
12392484 View in PubMed
Less detail

[6 months after psychiatric hospitalization. Discharged patients have no housing ].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217704
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jul 27;91(30-31):2789-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-27-1994
Author
L. Bogren
Author Affiliation
Psykiatriska kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset i Linköping.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jul 27;91(30-31):2789-92
Date
Jul-27-1994
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dementia - nursing - psychology - therapy
Housing
Humans
Length of Stay
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology - therapy
Patient Discharge
Social Support
Sweden
PubMed ID
8057734 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 10th Scientific Meeting of the European Society for Psychosocial Oncology (ESPO). Stockholm, Sweden, June 14-17, 1998. Abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21463
Source
Psychooncology. 1998 May-Jun;7(3):149-96
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Source
Psychooncology. 1998 May-Jun;7(3):149-96
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Humans
Neoplasms - psychology
Social Support
PubMed ID
9741976 View in PubMed
Less detail

[15th year of the Reach to Recovery Program in Russia: analysis of activity and evaluation of effectiveness (exemplified by the St. Petersburg experience)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168964
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2005;51(5):612-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005

[31 women with drug problems got children--what happened after that?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9974
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jan 10;121(1):73-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2001
Author
A. Sundfaer
Author Affiliation
Barne- og ungdomspsykiatrisk poliklinikk Ullevål sykehus 0407 Oslo. bupull@online.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jan 10;121(1):73-5
Date
Jan-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Child
Child Behavior
Child Development
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - psychology
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The intention of this study was to increase the knowledge concerning the rehabilitation of women with drug problems after the birth of a child and to find out how the children developed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A follow-up study of 31 women, former drug and alcohol abusers and their children, 19 girls and 12 boys born in 1982-1983. The first survey took place when the children were 2-3 years of age, then when they were 7-9 and at last when they were 15-17. The biological mothers, foster or adoptive mothers, the children and their teachers were interviewed. RESULTS: The women got more support and control during the pregnancy than afterwards. Most of the mothers became single. Women with the shortest drug history, a good social network and a stable partner without drug problems kept the care of their children. By the first survey (1985), seven children had been placed in foster homes, in the second (1992) two further children had been taken away from their mothers, and in the third (1999) only one third of the children were living with their biological mothers. Most of the children did well at school and in their families, had friends and leisure activities despite still living by their mothers or in foster/adoption homes. None of the youngsters had been in conflict with the law or were drug abusers, but every second teenage girl needed psychological support. Children who had been stable by their drug-free biological mothers functioned best. INTERPRETATION: Mothers with drug problems do not get sufficient attention after the delivery and when the children grow up. A supporting family should be brought in contact with mother and child after the delivery. Under special circumstances pregnancy can be a positive turning point for women with drug problems.
PubMed ID
12013619 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 120-S minute: using analysis of work activity to prevent psychological distress among elementary school teachers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209722
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 1997 Jan;2(1):45-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
K. Messing
A M Seifert
E. Escalona
Author Affiliation
Centre Pour l'Etude des Interactions Biologiques Entre la Santé et l'Environment (CINBIOSE), Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada. messing.karen@uqam.ca
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 1997 Jan;2(1):45-62
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Middle Aged
Quebec
Risk factors
Social Environment
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications - prevention & control
Teaching
Time and Motion Studies
Workload - psychology
Abstract
Primary school teachers in Québec suffer psychological distress, as shown by the Québec Health Survey (M. Gervais, 1993; Santè Québec, 1995). The authors applied and extended the French model (F. Guérin, A. Laville, F. Daniellou, J. Duraffourg, & A. Kerguelen, 1991) of analysis of work activity to observing classroom teaching (14 women in 10 classrooms for a total of 48 hr 24 min) to identify stressful elements. The authors observed a rapid sequence of actions, eye fixations of short duration, little physical or mental relaxation, multiple simultaneous activities, and uncomfortable temperature and humidity levels. Teachers use many strategies to teach, to create a learning environment, and to maintain attention in classrooms under adverse conditions. Examination of these strategies led to recommendations to improve relations between the teachers and their supervisors and to make the classroom an easier place to teach.
PubMed ID
9552279 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2013 Nov-Dec;36(6)
Publication Type
Article
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2013 Nov-Dec;36(6)
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awards and Prizes
Clinical Nursing Research
History, 21st Century
Humans
Internet
Leadership
Male
Norway
Oncology Nursing - methods
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Quality of Life
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Social Support
United States
Abstract
The winner of the "Best Original Research Paper in Cancer Nursing" Award for 2013 is "Effects of an Internet Support System to Assist Cancer Patients in Reducing Symptom Distress: A Randomized Controlled Trial" by Cornelia M. Ruland, PhD.
PubMed ID
24149985 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abide with me: religious group identification among older adults promotes health and well-being by maintaining multiple group memberships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113579
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):869-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Renate Ysseldyk
S Alexander Haslam
Catherine Haslam
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom. r.ysseldyk@uq.edu.au
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):869-79
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Data Collection
Depression - psychology
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Religion and Psychology
Residential Facilities
Social Identification
Social Support
Abstract
Aging is associated with deterioration in health and well-being, but previous research suggests that this can be attenuated by maintaining group memberships and the valued social identities associated with them. In this regard, religious identification may be especially beneficial in helping individuals withstand the challenges of aging, partly because religious identity serves as a basis for a wider social network of other group memberships. This paper aims to examine relationships between religion (identification and group membership) and well-being among older adults. The contribution of having and maintaining multiple group memberships in mediating these relationships is assessed, and also compared to patterns associated with other group memberships (social and exercise).
Study 1 (N = 42) surveyed older adults living in residential care homes in Canada, who completed measures of religious identity, other group memberships, and depression. Study 2 (N = 7021) longitudinally assessed older adults in the UK on similar measures, but with the addition of perceived physical health.
In Study 1, religious identification was associated with fewer depressive symptoms, and membership in multiple groups mediated that relationship. However, no relationships between social or exercise groups and mental health were evident. Study 2 replicated these patterns, but additionally, maintaining multiple group memberships over time partially mediated the relationship between religious group membership and physical health.
Together these findings suggest that religious social networks are an especially valuable source of social capital among older adults, supporting well-being directly and by promoting additional group memberships (including those that are non-religious).
PubMed ID
23711247 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ability OnLine: children in hospital now in touch with the world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214112
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Lefebvre
M. McClure
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Chronic Disease - psychology
Communication Aids for Disabled
Computer Communication Networks - utilization
Disabled Persons - psychology
Humans
Organizational Innovation
Peer Group
Self Concept
Social Facilitation
Social Support
Abstract
Health prevention seeks to avoid the onset of disease or symptoms by eliminating or at least minimizing environmental factors that increase the risk of illness. This article describes Ability OnLine, an innovative program designed to reduce the isolation young people can experience in a healthcare facility or when confined to their home. The electronic bulletin board is a friendly platform for disabled and chronically ill children to easily communicate with their peers and adult and teen mentors.
PubMed ID
10172531 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A blow in the face. Interview by Mette Fjordbo.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73399
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1993 Jan 20;93(3):4-6, 23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1993

3889 records – page 1 of 389.