Skip header and navigation

Refine By

23 records – page 1 of 3.

Academic Achievement of American Indian and Alaska Native Students: Does Social Emotional Competence Reduce the Impact of Poverty.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290702
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2017; 24(1):1-29
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Jennifer Chain
Valerie B Shapiro
Paul A LeBuffe
Ann McKay Bryson
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2017; 24(1):1-29
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Academic Success
Adolescent
Alaska Natives - psychology
Child
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Poverty - psychology
Social Skills
Students - psychology
Abstract
Social-emotional competence may be a protective factor for academic achievement among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) students. This study used Fisher's r to Z transformations to test for group differences in the magnitude of relationships between social-emotional competence and achievement. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to determine the variance in academic achievement explained by student race, poverty, and social-emotional competence, and the schoolwide percentage of students by race. Data are from 335 students across 6 schools. This study suggests that promoting social-emotional competence among AI/AN students could be a strategy for reducing disparities in academic achievement and the consequences of these disparities.
PubMed ID
28562835 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of Late Adolescent Personality With Risk for Subsequent Serious Mental Illness Among Men in a Swedish Nationwide Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284101
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2017 Jul 01;74(7):703-711
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-01-2017
Author
Joseph F Hayes
David P J Osborn
Glyn Lewis
Christina Dalman
Andreas Lundin
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2017 Jul 01;74(7):703-711
Date
Jul-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology
Emotions - physiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Personality - physiology
Personality Development
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Social Skills
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Understanding of personality as an independent risk factor for serious mental illness (SMI) remains limited. Recently, overlap between the polygenic basis for specific personality traits and specific SMIs has been identified.
To determine the association of the adolescent personality domains of social maturity, mental energy, and emotional stability with later diagnosis of SMI.
This longitudinal cohort study enrolled Swedish male military conscripts aged 18 or 19 years from January 1, 1974, through December 31, 1997. The diagnosis of an SMI was extracted from the National Patient Register for all inpatient treatment episodes in Sweden from January 1, 1974, through December 31, 2011. Data were analyzed from May 3 to September 16, 2016.
Social maturity, mental energy, and emotional stability assessed at conscription interview.
Inpatient diagnoses of bipolar disorder, schizoaffective disorder, schizophrenia, and other nonaffective psychoses occurring until December 31, 2011.
Of the 1?017?691 men included in the cohort, 4310 developed bipolar disorder; 784, schizoaffective disorder; 4823, schizophrenia; and 5013, other nonaffective psychoses. After adjustment, with use of mean scores as a reference, low social maturity (hazard ratio [HR], 1.61; 95% CI, 1.48-1.74), low mental energy (HR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.24-1.44), and low emotional stability (HR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.40-1.63) were inversely associated with schizophrenia in a dose-dependent fashion. Other nonaffective psychoses displayed a similar pattern. Bipolar disorder was associated with high (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.09-1.35) and low (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.01-1.25) social maturity and low emotional stability (HR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.46-1.78). Schizoaffective disorder was associated with low emotional stability (HR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.26-1.85).
Emotional stability is inversely associated with all SMI. Bipolar disorder has a unique U-shaped association with social maturity. Premorbid personality may reflect subtle changes in cerebral function, may combine with symptoms and other neurocognitive deficits to influence illness presentation, and/or may be owing to shared genetic architecture.
PubMed ID
28538982 View in PubMed
Less detail

Customisation of an instrument to assess anaesthesiologists' non-technical skills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266260
Source
Int J Med Educ. 2015;6:17-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Rikke M H G Jepsen
Lene Spanager
Helle T Lyk-Jensen
Peter Dieckmann
Doris Østergaard
Source
Int J Med Educ. 2015;6:17-25
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anesthesiology - manpower
Awareness
Calibration
Clinical Competence
Denmark
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse Anesthetists - psychology - standards
Nurses
Operating Rooms - manpower
Physicians - psychology - standards
Questionnaires - standards
Social Skills
Young Adult
Abstract
The objectives of the study were to identify Danish anaesthesiologists' non-technical skills and to customise the Scottish-developed Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills instrument for Danish anaesthesiologists.
Six semi-structured group interviews were conducted with 31 operating room team members: anaes-thesiologists, nurse anaesthetists, surgeons, and scrub nurses. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using directed content analysis. Anaesthesiologists' non-technical skills were identified, coded, and sorted using the original instrument as a basis. The resulting prototype instrument was discussed with anaesthesiologists from 17 centres to ensure face validity.
Interviews lasted 46-67 minutes. Identified examples of anaesthesiologists' good or poor non-technical skills fit the four categories in the original instrument: situation awareness; decision making; team working; and task management. Anaesthesiologists' leadership role in the operating room was emphasised: the original 'Task Management' category was named 'Leadership'. One new element, 'Demonstrating self-awareness' was added under the category 'Situation Awareness'. Compared with the original instrument, half of the behavioural markers were new, which reflected that being aware of and communicating one's own abilities to the team; working systematically; and speaking up to avoid adverse events were important skills.
The Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills instrument was customised to a Danish setting using the identified non-technical skills for anaesthesiologists and the original instrument as basis. The customised instrument comprises four categories and 16 underpinning elements supported by multiple behavioural markers. Identifying non-technical skills through semi-structured group interviews and analysing them using direct content analysis proved a useful method for customising an assessment instrument to another setting.
Notes
Cites: Br J Anaesth. 2010 Jul;105(1):3-620551023
Cites: Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2010 Jul;27(7):592-720520556
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 2009 Oct;35(10):1667-7219697007
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Jan 29;360(5):491-919144931
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2007 Dec;19(6):349-5717872937
Cites: Acad Med. 2007 Oct;82(10 Suppl):S109-1617895673
Cites: Med Educ. 2006 Apr;40(4):314-2116573666
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Nov;15(9):1277-8816204405
Cites: World J Surg. 2003 Aug;27(8):972-8; discussion 97812879288
Cites: Br J Anaesth. 2002 Mar;88(3):418-2911990277
Cites: Acad Med. 2002 Mar;77(3):232-711891163
Cites: Br J Anaesth. 2003 May;90(5):580-812697584
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2014 Aug;58(7):773-425040951
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2014 Aug;58(7):794-80124673620
Cites: Dan Med J. 2012 Nov;59(11):A452623171747
Cites: Am J Surg. 2012 Sep;204(3):347-5422178486
Cites: J Am Coll Surg. 2012 Feb;214(2):214-3022200377
Cites: JAMA. 2010 Oct 20;304(15):1693-70020959579
Cites: Br J Anaesth. 2011 Jan;106(1):38-4321118845
Cites: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2011 Aug;16(3):311-2921113820
Cites: Anaesthesia. 2012 Feb;67(2):158-6422251107
Cites: Arch Surg. 2011 Dec;146(12):1368-7322184295
Cites: Br J Anaesth. 2011 Sep;107(3):372-721676891
PubMed ID
25702157 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dental fear, tobacco use and alcohol use among university students in Finland: a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258534
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:86
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Vesa Pohjola
Lauri Rannanautio
Kristina Kunttu
Jorma I Virtanen
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:86
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Anxiety - epidemiology
Emotions
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Skills
Students - statistics & numerical data
Tobacco Use - epidemiology
Tobacco, Smokeless
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
Tobacco- and alcohol use are associated with psychological problems. Individuals with high dental fear also more often report other psychological problems than do those with lower level of dental fear. We evaluated the association between dental fear and tobacco- and alcohol use while controlling for age, gender, general mood and feelings in social situations.
The data (n?=?8514) were collected from all universities in Finland with an electronic inquiry sent to all first-year university students. Dental fear was measured with the question: "How afraid are you of visiting a dentist?" with reply alternatives "Not at all", "Somewhat" and "Very". Regularity of tobacco use was determined with the question: "Do you smoke or use snuff?", with reply alternatives "Not at all", "Occasionally" and "Daily". The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) was used for determination of alcohol use; an AUDIT sum score of 8 or more indicated hazardous, harmful or dependent alcohol use. The statistical tests used were Chi-square tests and Multiple logistic regression analyses.
When controlled for age, gender, alcohol use, general mood and feelings in social situations, those who used tobacco regularly were more likely to have high dental fear than were those who used tobacco occasionally or not at all. When controlled for age, gender, general mood and feelings in social situations, those with hazardous, harmful or dependent alcohol use were more likely to have high dental fear than were those with low-risk of alcohol use, the association between alcohol use and dental fear was not strong. When tobacco use was added into this model, alcohol use was no longer statistically significantly associated with dental fear.
The findings of this study support the suggestion that some people may have common vulnerability factors linked to tobacco use, alcohol use, and dental fear.
Notes
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2001 Nov;179:432-711689401
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2001 Dec;29(6):456-6311784289
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2002 Jan-Feb;37(1):61-611825859
Cites: J Anxiety Disord. 2004;18(1):7-1814725865
Cites: Acta Odontol Scand. 1990 Dec;48(6):365-92288208
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1993 Jun;150(6):941-68494073
Cites: Addiction. 1993 Jun;88(6):791-8048329970
Cites: Int Dent J. 1993 Jun;43(3 Suppl 1):265-788406957
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1997 Apr;54(4):313-219107147
Cites: J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry. 1998 Sep;29(3):227-379847042
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004 Nov;61(11):1107-1515520358
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2006 Oct;26(6):746-6816806621
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2006 Dec 1;85(3):255-716793223
Cites: Acta Odontol Scand. 2007 Apr;65(2):97-10217453427
Cites: Acta Odontol Scand. 2007 Aug;65(4):236-4017762987
Cites: Biochem Pharmacol. 2008 Jan 1;75(1):178-9517888884
Cites: J Anxiety Disord. 2008;22(1):67-7717367987
Cites: J Am Coll Health. 2008 Jan-Feb;56(4):409-1418316285
Cites: Addict Behav. 2009 Feb;34(2):134-4518851897
Cites: Am J Addict. 2009 Jan-Feb;18(1):93-919219671
Cites: Public Health. 2009 Feb;123(2):103-919147163
Cites: J Am Coll Health. 2009 Mar-Apr;57(5):507-1219254891
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2010 Feb;30(1):12-2419748166
Cites: J Dent Res. 2010 Mar;89(3):297-30120075372
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2010 May;70(9):1416-2220171000
Cites: Eur J Oral Sci. 2011 Feb;119(1):55-6021244512
Cites: Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2011 Apr;65(3):213-2521507127
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2011 Jun;131(1-3):233-4221247636
Cites: Int J Adolesc Med Health. 2011;23(1):33-721721361
Cites: Coll Antropol. 2010 Dec;34(4):1315-2221874715
Cites: BMC Res Notes. 2012;5:10122339943
Cites: Hum Genet. 2012 Jun;131(6):779-8922543841
Cites: BMC Med. 2012;10:12323083451
Cites: Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 Mar;71(2):300-622545790
Cites: JAMA. 2000 Nov 22-29;284(20):2606-1011086367
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2000 Mar;20(2):149-7110721495
Cites: Alcohol Res. 2012;34(4):414-3123584108
PubMed ID
25012119 View in PubMed
Less detail

Durability of the efficacy of integrated care in schizophrenia: a five-year randomized controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267280
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2014 Aug 1;65(8):1054-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2014
Author
Ulf Ingemar Malm
Bo Åke Rutger Ivarsson
Peter Allebeck
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2014 Aug 1;65(8):1054-7
Date
Aug-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Mental Health Services - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Personal Satisfaction
Schizophrenia - rehabilitation - therapy
Social Skills
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate the durability of efficacy of the Integrated Care (IC) program in a Swedish context. The IC program is a person-centered flexible assertive community treatment approach delivered through a novel mechanism: a resource group clinical microsystem for each patient.
All patients with schizophrenia in a Gothenburg urban-sector catchment area were randomly assigned to either the IC or the Rational Rehabilitation (RR) programs. Sixty-six patients were interviewed and assessed by independent interviewers before treatment, after treatment (24 months), and at follow-up (five years). Analysis was by intention to treat.
At the five-year follow-up, significant improvements were noted in social functioning and consumer satisfaction in the IC group (N=35) compared with the RR group (N=31). No patients were lost to services in either program.
The major finding was the durability of efficacy of the IC program.
PubMed ID
24932858 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early Predictors of Ten-Year Course in First-Episode Psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279449
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Apr 01;67(4):438-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-01-2016
Author
Svein Friis
Ingrid Melle
Jan Olav Johannessen
Jan Ivar Røssberg
Helene Eidsmo Barder
Julie Horgen Evensen
Ulrik Haahr
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Inge Joa
Johannes Langeveld
Tor Ketil Larsen
Stein Opjordsmoen
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Erik Simonsen
Per Wiggen Vaglum
Thomas H McGlashan
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Apr 01;67(4):438-43
Date
Apr-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Remission Induction
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Social Skills
Time Factors
Abstract
Identifying patients at risk of poor outcome at an early stage of illness can aid in treatment planning. This study sought to create a best-fit statistical model of known baseline and early-course risk factors to predict time in psychosis during a ten-year follow-up period after a first psychotic episode.
Between 1997 and 2000, 301 patients with DSM-IV nonorganic, nonaffective first-episode psychosis were recruited consecutively from catchment area-based sectors in Norway and Denmark. Specialized mental health personnel evaluated patients at baseline, three months, and one, two, five, and ten years (N=186 at ten years). Time in psychosis was defined as time with scores =4 on any of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale items P1, P3, P5, P6, and G9. Evaluations were retrospective, based on clinical interviews and all available clinical information. During the first two years, patients were also evaluated by their clinicians at least biweekly. Baseline and early-course predictors of long-term course were identified with linear mixed-model analyses.
Four variables provided significant, additive predictions of longer time in psychosis during the ten-year follow-up: deterioration in premorbid social functioning, duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) of =26 weeks, core schizophrenia spectrum disorder, and no remission within three months.
First-episode psychosis patients should be followed carefully after the start of treatment. If symptoms do not remit within three months with adequate treatment, there is a considerable risk of a poor long-term outcome, particularly for patients with a deterioration in premorbid social functioning, a DUP of at least half a year, and a diagnosis within the core schizophrenia spectrum.
PubMed ID
26567932 View in PubMed
Less detail

Enhanced neurocognitive functioning and positive temperament in twins discordant for bipolar disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262718
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2014 Nov 1;171(11):1191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2014
Author
Rachel G Higier
Amy M Jimenez
Christina M Hultman
Jacqueline Borg
Cristina Roman
Isabelle Kizling
Henrik Larsson
Tyrone D Cannon
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2014 Nov 1;171(11):1191-8
Date
Nov-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Cognition
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Registries
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Social Skills
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperament
Twins
Verbal Learning
Abstract
Based on evidence linking creativity and bipolar disorder, a model has been proposed whereby factors influencing liability to bipolar disorder confer certain traits with positive effects on reproductive fitness. The authors tested this model by examining key traits known to be associated with evolutionary fitness, namely, temperament and neurocognition, in individuals carrying liability for bipolar disorder. Schizophrenia probands and their co-twins were included as psychiatric controls.
Twin pairs discordant for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia and control pairs were identified through the Swedish Twin Registry. The authors administered a neuropsychological test battery and temperament questionnaires to samples of bipolar probands, bipolar co-twins, schizophrenia probands, schizophrenia co-twins, and controls. Multivariate mixed-model analyses of variance were conducted to compare groups on temperament and neurocognitive scores.
Bipolar co-twins showed elevated scores on a "positivity" temperament scale compared with controls and bipolar probands, while bipolar probands scored higher on a "negativity" scale compared with their co-twins and controls, who did not differ. Additionally, bipolar co-twins showed superior performance compared with controls on tests of verbal learning and fluency, while bipolar probands showed performance decrements across all neurocognitive domains. In contrast, schizophrenia co-twins showed attenuated impairments in positivity and overall neurocognitive functioning relative to their ill proband counterparts.
These findings suggest that supra-normal levels of sociability and verbal functioning may be associated with liability for bipolar disorder. These effects were specific to liability for bipolar disorder and did not apply to schizophrenia. Such benefits may provide a partial explanation for the persistence of bipolar illness in the population.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Psychiatry. 2014 Nov 1;171(11):1145-725756628
PubMed ID
25124743 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exploring communication and interaction skills at work among participants in individual placement and support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281601
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2016 Jul;23(4):314-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Annika Lexén
Ulrika Bejerholm
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2016 Jul;23(4):314-9
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment, Supported
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Social Skills
Sweden
Abstract
Not all people with severe mental illness who attend Individual Placement and Support (IPS) gain and keep their jobs or work full time. Research has indicated a relationship between social disabilities and work performance in this group, and that support provided is often directed towards the social work environment. However, relationships between social skills performed in an authentic work setting and vocational outcomes have not been explored.
To explore relationships between social communication and interaction skills and vocational outcomes among IPS service users in a Swedish context.
Twenty-nine participants were appraised with the Assessment of Communication and Interaction Skills (ACIS-S) instrument, and their vocational data were registered. Correlations were estimated using Spearman's rho test with Bonferroni corrections at item level.
Better communication and interaction skills were significantly correlated with increased working hours (rs?=?0.64) and higher income (rs?=?0.45). Increased working hours were related to assuming postures, asking questions, sharing information, and sustaining conversation in an appropriate manner.
The results indicate that occupational therapists need to focus on social skills and accommodation of the social work environment in order to promote sustainable working careers among people with severe mental illness.
PubMed ID
26539744 View in PubMed
Less detail

Five years of specialised early intervention versus two years of specialised early intervention followed by three years of standard treatment for patients with a first episode psychosis: randomised, superiority, parallel group trial in Denmark (OPUS II).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281476
Source
BMJ. 2017 Jan 12;356:i6681
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-12-2017
Author
Nikolai Albert
Marianne Melau
Heidi Jensen
Charlotte Emborg
Jens Richardt Mollegaard Jepsen
Birgitte Fagerlund
Christian Gluud
Ole Mors
Carsten Hjorthøj
Merete Nordentoft
Source
BMJ. 2017 Jan 12;356:i6681
Date
Jan-12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Behavior Therapy
Community Mental Health Services
Denmark
Early Medical Intervention
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - therapy
Social Skills
Young Adult
Abstract
 To compare the effects of five years of specialised early intervention (SEI) treatment for first episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder with the standard two years of SEI plus three years of treatment as usual.
 Randomised, superiority, parallel group trial with blinded outcome assessment. Randomisation was centralised and computerised with concealed randomisation sequence carried out at an external site.
 Participants were recruited from six OPUS teams in Denmark between 2009 and 2012. OPUS teams provide SEI treatment to all patients diagnosed with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder in Denmark.
 400 participants (51% women) with a mean age of 25.6 (standard deviation 4.3) were randomised to five years of SEI (experimental intervention; n=197) or to two years of SEI plus three years of treatment as usual (control; n=203).
 OPUS treatment consists of three core elements-modified assertive community treatment, family involvement, and social skill training-with a patient-case manager ratio of no more than 12:1. For participants randomised to five years of OPUS treatment, the treatment was largely unchanged. Participants randomised to the control group were mostly referred to community health centres after two years of SEI treatment.
 Follow-up assessments were conducted five years after start of OPUS treatment. Primary outcome was negative symptoms measured on the scale for assessment of negative symptoms (avolition-apathy, anhedonia, alogia, and affective blunting). Secondary outcomes were remission of both negative and psychotic symptoms, psychotic symptoms, suicidal ideation, substance abuse, compliance with medical treatment, adherence with treatment, client satisfaction, days in hospital care, and labour market affiliation.
 Levels of negative symptoms did not differ between the intervention group and control group (1.72 v 1.81 points; estimated mean difference -0.10 (95% confidence interval 0.33 to 0.13), P=0.39). Participants receiving five years of OPUS treatment were more likely to remain in contact with specialised mental health services (90.4% v 55.6%, P
Notes
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1997 Jan;170:2-59068766
Cites: J Nerv Ment Dis. 2015 May;203(5):310-825919380
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2010 May;196(5):372-620435962
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1998 Aug;155(8):1087-919699698
Cites: BMJ. 2008 Mar 15;336(7644):601-518316340
Cites: BMJ. 2005 Sep 17;331(7517):60216141449
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2013 Jul 30;13:20023898805
Cites: Eur J Intern Med. 2016 Jul;32:13-2127160381
Cites: JAMA. 2004 May 26;291(20):2457-6515161896
Cites: J Marital Fam Ther. 2003 Apr;29(2):223-4512728780
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1980 Apr;37(4):392-77362425
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2004 Jun 1;68(2-3):283-9715099610
Cites: Early Interv Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;3 Suppl 1:S3-721352194
Cites: Trials. 2011 Mar 10;12:7221392377
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2011 Jul;129(2-3):111-521549566
Cites: Trials. 2015 Jan 27;16:2525623736
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2000 Jul;35(7):283-711016522
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2005 Mar;162(3):441-915741458
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011 Jun 15;(6):CD00471821678345
Cites: Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2014 May;27(3):167-7224662959
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 1996;22(2):305-268782288
Cites: BMJ. 2012 Sep 14;345:e584022983531
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010 Dec 08;(12):CD00008821154340
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1994 Oct;151(10):1409-168092334
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1995 Aug;52(8):679-877632121
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2013 Sep;149(1-3):141-823845387
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2012 Oct 4;367(14):1355-6023034025
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2008 Sep;104(1-3):287-9318595665
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2015 May;41(3):617-2625381449
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2015 Jun;206(6):492-50025657355
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2012 Sep 18;157(6):429-3822945832
Cites: Stat Med. 2012 Feb 20;31(4):328-4022139891
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;65(7):762-7118606949
Cites: Ann Gen Psychiatry. 2011 Jan 20;10:221251305
Cites: J Psychol. 2005 Sep;139(5):439-5716285214
Cites: J Nerv Ment Dis. 2015 May;203(5):379-8625900547
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2005 Nov 1;79(1):95-10516122909
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2014 Mar;40(2):314-2624493852
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2015 Feb 14;15:2225881022
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 Dec 4;135(11):982-911730399
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;62(9):975-8316143729
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1995 May;52(5):341-517726714
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;169(4):374-8022407080
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2010 Jun;167(6):686-9320360319
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):30-321775347
Cites: Schizophr Res. 1992 Mar;6(3):209-231571314
Cites: Eval Program Plann. 1982;5(3):233-710259963
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2014 Jul;67(7):769-7224560088
PubMed ID
28082379 View in PubMed
Less detail

How are social-emotional and behavioral competences and problems at age 1 year associated with infant motor development? A general population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297415
Source
Infant Behav Dev. 2018 05; 51:1-14
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2018
Author
Susanna Kovaniemi
Jaana Alakortes
Alice S Carter
Anneli Yliherva
Risto Bloigu
Leena O Joskitt
Irma K Moilanen
Hanna E Ebeling
Author Affiliation
PEDEGO Research Unit, Clinic of Child Psychiatry, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Finland. Electronic address: susanna.kovaniemi@student.oulu.fi.
Source
Infant Behav Dev. 2018 05; 51:1-14
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Autism Spectrum Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child Development - physiology
Emotions - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior - physiology - psychology
Male
Motor Skills - physiology
Parents - psychology
Population Surveillance - methods
Problem Behavior - psychology
Random Allocation
Social Skills
Abstract
Based on limitations in previous research evidence, we concluded that more research is needed for deeper understanding of how social-emotional and behavioral (SEB) outcomes among infant-toddler-aged children in the general population are associated with early motor development. In this study, we investigated associations between early competencies and problems, as measured by the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA), and the timing of achievement of the main gross and fine motor milestones usually attained during the first year of life in a general population context. The study sample consisted of 515 infants (mean age 12.9 [SD 0.9] months) and their parents (514 mothers, 434 fathers), who were recruited in child health centers in Northern Finland. The infants were divided into two groups, based on their BITSEA screen status, and motor milestone achievement ages were compared across BITSEA screen status No Concern and Of-Concern infants. An Of-Concern screen status on the maternal and paternal Competence scale and Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) item cluster was associated with later infant achievement ages for gross motor milestones. By contrast, infants who were screened to be in the Of-Concern range on the maternal Problem scale achieved gross motor milestones earlier than infants with the corresponding No Concern screen status. No significant associations were found between the paternal Problem scale screen status and infant motor development. In further analyses, the strongest associations were found between an Of-Concern screen status on the paternal Competence scale and ASD item cluster and infant motor development. The findings indicate that the inclusion of infant motor developmental information may assist early identification and the clinical interpretation of parental reports of early SEB problems. Clinical implications of the current findings are discussed in the paper.
PubMed ID
29500960 View in PubMed
Less detail

23 records – page 1 of 3.