Skip header and navigation

Refine By

296 records – page 1 of 30.

Ability-based notions of health and disease in the Norwegian social security system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133644
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2011 Jun 3;131(11):1097-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-3-2011
Author
Hans Magnus Solli
Author Affiliation
Research Unit, Vestfold Mental Health Care Trust, Norway. hmsolli@online.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2011 Jun 3;131(11):1097-100
Date
Jun-3-2011
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diagnosis
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons
Goals
Health status
Humans
Insurance, Health
Norway
Philosophy, Medical
Social Environment
Social Security
Work Capacity Evaluation
PubMed ID
21681241 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abstinence, occasional drinking and binge drinking in middle-aged women. The Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92823
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):186-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Rundberg Jenny
Lidfeldt Jonas
Nerbrand Christina
Samsioe Göran
Romelsjö Anders
Ojehagen Agneta
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund-Psychiatry, USIL, Lund UniversityHospital, Kioskgatan 19, 221 85 Lund, Sweden. jenny.rundberg@med.lu.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):186-91
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Middle Aged
Motivation
Social Environment
Social Security - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Temperance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Although drinking patterns in women have received increased attention, few studies have focused on middle-aged women. Drinking patterns were investigated in a population sample of 513 Swedish women aged 50-59, and analysed in relation to social situation, and mental and physical health. The chi-square test was used to analyse differences in proportions. Variables showing significant differences were entered into a multivariate or multinomial logistic regression model. Abstainers and occasional drinkers had lower levels of education and more often regular medical control compared with weekly drinkers. Furthermore, abstainers more often had disability pension. Among women drinking alcohol, 56.6% affirmed binge drinking within the last year and 39.4% within the last month. Binge drinkers did not differ in terms of social situation, mental or physical health, compared with other drinkers. Drinking to relieve tension was affirmed by 7.2%. These women had more mental symptoms and less contact with friends compared with other drinkers; furthermore, they were more often binge drinkers. Binge drinking was common and health and social consequences of this drinking pattern in middle-aged women need to be further explored. Women drinking to relieve tension may need intervention for both drinking habits and mental health.
PubMed ID
18609026 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Access to own health information and services on the Internet by disability pensioners and other citizens]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91436
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Nov;94(11):729-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Halldórsdóttir Gyda
Thoroddsen Asta St
Author Affiliation
Heilsuneti ehf. gyda@heilsunet.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Nov;94(11):729-35
Date
Nov-2008
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Consumer Health Information
Disabled Persons - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Research
Humans
Iceland
Insurance, Disability
Internet
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Middle Aged
Patient Access to Records
Patient satisfaction
Pensions
Perception
Questionnaires
Social Security
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study Icelandic citizens' perception, attitude and preferences regarding access to own health information and interactive services at the State Social Security Institute of Iceland (SSSI). Hypotheses regarding differences between disability pensioners and other citizens were put forward. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A descriptive mail survey was performed with a random sample from the Icelandic population, 1400 individuals, age 16 to 67, divided into two groups of 700 each: (1) persons entitled to disability pension (2) other citizens in Iceland. The questionnaire consisted of 56 questions, descriptive statistics were used and Chi square for comparison with 95% as confidence level of significance. Response rate was 34.9%. RESULTS: Perception of rights to access own's health information was significantly higher by pensioners than other citizens. Attitude concerning impact of access was in general positive, with pensioners significantly more positive about effectiveness, perception of health, communication and decisions owing to services, access at SSSI, maintaining health records and controlling access. CONCLUSIONS: The study, the first of its kind in Iceland, supports previous research. The results, as well as foreign models of research projects, are recommended to be used for evolution of electronic health services and researching employees' viewpoints. Future research in Iceland should address the impact of interactive health communication on quality of life, health and services' efficiency.
PubMed ID
18974434 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing social and gender inequalities in health among seniors in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184961
Source
Cad Saude Publica. 2003 May-Jun;19(3):855-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Louise A Plouffe
Author Affiliation
Division of Aging and Seniors Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Cad Saude Publica. 2003 May-Jun;19(3):855-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - physiology
Canada
Community Health Planning
Female
Health Policy
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Quality of Life
Sex Factors
Social Justice
Social Security
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Although canadian seniors enjoy economic security and good health and have made substantial gains in recent decades, this well-being is not equally shared among socioeconomic groups and between men and women. As for younger age groups, income predicts health status in later life, but less powerfully. Potential alternative explanations include an overriding influence of the aging process, the subjective effects of income loss at retirement and the attenuation of the poverty gap owing to public retirement income. Older women are more likely to age in poverty than men, to live alone and to depend on inadequately resourced chronic health care and social services. These differences will hold as well for the next cohort of seniors in Canada. Addressing these disparities in health requires a comprehensive, multisectoral approach to health that is embodied in Canada's population health model. Application of this model to reduce these disparities is described, drawing upon the key strategies of the population health approach, recent federal government initiatives and actions recommended to the government by federal commissions.
PubMed ID
12806488 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A follow up of persons who received basic and/or supplemental benefits in childhood]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29203
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 9;126(4):436-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-9-2006
Author
Tor Bjerkedal
Petter Kristensen
Geir A Skjeret
John Ivar Brevik
Author Affiliation
Forsvarets sanitet, Militaermedisinsk epidemiologi, Ullevål universitetssykehus, Oslo mil/Akershus, 0015 Oslo. tor.bjerkedal@chello.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 9;126(4):436-9
Date
Feb-9-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease - economics - mortality - psychology
Comparative Study
Disabled Children - psychology
Educational Status
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income
Infant
Male
Norway
Pensions
Registries
Social Security
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Consequences of chronic diseases in childhood with respect to health, educational achievement and participation in the labour force in young adult age are evaluated. MATERIAL AND METHODS :A total of 14,364 children (2.3%) of the 626,928 born in Norway 1967-76 received basic and /or supplemental benefits for at least one year of the age span 0-16 years. The more common diagnoses included Endocrine diseases (diabetes), disease classified under Mental diagnoses, Neurological diseases and Congenital malformations. All the children were followed up to the age of 27 with respect to mortality and disability pensioning and to the age of 25 with regard to education, participation in the labour force and income, and in addition national service for the men. The study was made possible through the linking of data from several national registers, performed by Statistics Norway. Before the file was released for analyses, all personal identification was removed. RESULTS: Basic and supplementary benefits in childhood predict adverse outcomes in young adult age: mortality, disability, low education, lack of gainful employment and low pensionable income. The diagnosis registered with the benefit strongly influenced the outcomes. Conscripts who had received benefits were judged to have a mean score for general ability of 4.5 compared to 5.2. Adjusted for score for general ability the proportion of those having received benefits achieving higher education was 84% of that of those that had not received benefits. After adjustment for educational attainment, the percentage gainfully employed was 11-12% less among subjects having received benefits in childhood. This negative association between having received a benefit in childhood and gainful employment in adulthood was restricted to the low educational group. INTERPRETATION: Persons with health problems in childhood did not achieve the education, employment and income they should have been capable of judged by their general ability and the education they had actually achieved.
PubMed ID
16477279 View in PubMed
Less detail

[[Aging of the population and social policy: lessons from Sweden].]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73181
Source
Jinkogaku Kenkyu. 1994 May;(17):5-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
N. Maruo
Source
Jinkogaku Kenkyu. 1994 May;(17):5-14
Date
May-1994
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Birth rate
Demography
Developed Countries
Economics
Employment
English Abstract
Europe
Fertility
Financial Management
Financing, Government
Health Manpower
Income
Marriage
Population
Population Characteristics
Population Dynamics
Scandinavia
Social Security
Sweden
Abstract
"In this paper I tried to show how the ageing of the population influences the change in the growth of employment, employment structure, the savings ratio, economic growth and the cost of social security [in Sweden]. In the latter part of the paper I suggested a close correlation between the average marriage age of women, the total fertility rate and the work participation ratio of women." (SUMMARY IN ENG)
PubMed ID
12319307 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol consumption, problem drinking, abstention and disability pension award. The Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study (HUNT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133418
Source
Addiction. 2012 Jan;107(1):98-108
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Ann Kristin Knudsen
Arnstein Mykletun
Sverre Nesvåg
Simon Øverland
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Health Promotion, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Addiction. 2012 Jan;107(1):98-108
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Social Security - statistics & numerical data
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine associations of abstention, alcohol consumption and problem drinking with subsequent disability pensioning (DP), and whether previous excessive consumption ('sick-quitting') could explain some of the increased risk for DP among abstainers.
Prospective population-based study.
Data were from two waves of the Nord-Tr?ndelag Health Study (HUNT) linked with the national insurance database. The two main analyses included 37,729 (alcohol consumption) and 34,666 (problem drinking) participants.
Alcohol consumption was measured by self-reported consumption, while problem drinking was assessed by the Cut down, Annoyed, Guilt, Eye-opener (CAGE) questionnaire. Information on subsequent DP, including diagnosis for which the DP was awarded, was gathered from the national insurance database. Covariates included somatic illness and symptoms, mental health, health-related behaviour, socio-economic status and social activity.
Those reporting the highest level of alcohol consumption were not at increased risk for DP [hazard ratio (HR) 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.92-1.38], whereas problem drinking was a strong predictor (HR 2.79, 95% CI: 2.08-3.75) compared to their corresponding reference groups. Alcohol abstainers were also at increased risk for DP, but among them, the previous consumers (HR 1.95, 95% CI: 1.48-2.57) and previous excessive consumers (HR 1.67, 95% CI: 1.01-2.74) were at higher risk for DP than constant abstainers.
Problem drinking is linked to subsequent requirement for a disability pension but mere alcohol consumption is not. This is partly explained by 'sick-quitting'.
PubMed ID
21707810 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allocation of rehabilitation measures provided by the Social Insurance Institution in Finland: a register linkage study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163871
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2007 Apr;39(3):198-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Heikki Suoyrjö
Katariina Hinkka
Mika Kivimäki
Timo Klaukka
Jaana Pentti
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
Petrea, Social Insurance Institution of Finland, Turku. heikki.suoyrjo@petrea.fi
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2007 Apr;39(3):198-204
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease - rehabilitation
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Insurance, Health - economics - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Rehabilitation, Vocational - economics - statistics & numerical data
Retirement - economics - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Social Security - economics - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study the allocation of rehabilitation measures provided by the Finnish Social Insurance Institution in relation to the characteristics and health status of rehabilitants.
A register linkage study.
A total of 67,106 full-time local government employees with a minimum of 10-month job contracts in 10 Finnish towns during the period 1994-2002.
Data on the rehabilitation granted between 1994 and 2002, special medication reimbursements for chronic diseases, and disability retirement, were derived from the registers of the Social Insurance Institution as an indicator of chronic morbidity and linked to the employers' records on demographic characteristics and rates of sickness absence.
In comparison with non-rehabilitants, the rate of sickness absence (> 21 days) was 2.2-2.9-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0-3.0) higher, the odds ratios of special medication reimbursement 1.5-6.1-fold (95% CI 1.3-6.9) higher and disability retirement 3.1-7.5-fold (95% CI 2.7-9.3) higher among rehabilitants. Older women and employees in manual or lower-grade non-manual jobs predominated in the rehabilitation groups. The proportion of temporary employees receiving rehabilitation was low.
Permanently employed older women with an excess burden of health problems predominate in the receipt of rehabilitation provided by the Social Insurance Institution.
PubMed ID
17468787 View in PubMed
Less detail

America's elderly: policy implications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6039
Source
Popul Bull. 1981;35(4 Supplement):1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
M. Barberis
Source
Popul Bull. 1981;35(4 Supplement):1-13
Date
1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Americas
Delivery of Health Care
Demography
Dependency (Psychology)
Developed Countries
Economics
Employment
Financial Management
Financing, Government
Government Programs
Health
Health Facilities, Proprietary
Health services
Housing
Income
Men
North America
Old Age Assistance
Organization and Administration
Population
Population Characteristics
Population Dynamics
Public Policy
Social Class
Social Security
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Women
Abstract
Senior citizens, particularly those aged 75 or older, are the fastest growing group in the US today. 25 million strong, the elderly make up 11% of the total population, the proportion ranging from 18.1% in Florida to 2.6% in Alaska. 1/4 of the federal budget, $155 billion in 1980, now goes to their support yet many face difficulty in gaining access to the programs designed to benefit them. The elderly, especially those who rely solely on Social Security, comprise a disproportionate share of all poor households. The retirement system itself is facing financing challenges that promise to grow as the baby boom generation swells the number of senior citizens to 55 million in 2030. Plans to coordinate government programs and improve the method of financing the retirement system are receiving increasing attention. Financing Social Security from revenue funds, or with actuarial reserves, are 2 alternatives to the present pay-as-you-go system. Another area of concern to policymakers is America's health care system, which is now crisis oriented and heavily biased toward institutionalization. Health care must be made more responsive to the long-term needs of the oldest segment of the population, many of whom suffer from chronic illnesses. Impaired elderly receive most of their care from family or friends, and private organizations, but this natural support network largely has been ignored by government. New program initiatives might emphasize homemaker services, geriatric day care, compensation for families that provide for the needs of an elderly relative, and the strengthening of the informal partnership between the elderly themselves, their families and friends, community groups, private organizations, and government at the state and local as well as the federal level.
PubMed ID
12146279 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An investigation among recipients of pensions in a small town].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112287
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1965 Nov 18;127(46):1491
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-18-1965
Author
R F Jorgensen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1965 Nov 18;127(46):1491
Date
Nov-18-1965
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark
Humans
Pensions
Social Security
PubMed ID
5870239 View in PubMed
Less detail

296 records – page 1 of 30.