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558 records – page 1 of 56.

Source
Ont Dent. 1997 Nov;74(9):35-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
A. Abramson
B. Smith
Author Affiliation
Community Health Dental Programs, Windsor-Essex County Health Unit.
Source
Ont Dent. 1997 Nov;74(9):35-8
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Abuse - diagnosis - legislation & jurisprudence
Dental Care for Children - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Humans
Male
Mandatory Reporting
Ontario
Social Responsibility
PubMed ID
9470636 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Oncol. 1995 Jul;5(2):VII-VIII
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
J D Beatty
Source
Can J Oncol. 1995 Jul;5(2):VII-VIII
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Humans
Neoplasms
Social Responsibility
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
8853506 View in PubMed
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Accountability and pediatric physician-researchers: are theoretical models compatible with Canadian lived experience?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130725
Source
Philos Ethics Humanit Med. 2011;6:15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Christine Czoli
Michael Da Silva
Randi Zlotnik Shaul
Lori d'Agincourt-Canning
Christy Simpson
Katherine Boydell
Natalie Rashkovan
Sharon Vanin
Author Affiliation
The Hospital for Sick Children, c/o Bioethics Department, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8, Canada.
Source
Philos Ethics Humanit Med. 2011;6:15
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Models, Theoretical
Pediatrics
Physician's Role
Research Personnel - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Responsibility
Abstract
Physician-researchers are bound by professional obligations stemming from both the role of the physician and the role of the researcher. Currently, the dominant models for understanding the relationship between physician-researchers' clinical duties and research duties fit into three categories: the similarity position, the difference position and the middle ground. The law may be said to offer a fourth "model" that is independent from these three categories.These models frame the expectations placed upon physician-researchers by colleagues, regulators, patients and research participants. This paper examines the extent to which the data from semi-structured interviews with 30 physician-researchers at three major pediatric hospitals in Canada reflect these traditional models. It seeks to determine the extent to which existing models align with the described lived experience of the pediatric physician-researchers interviewed.Ultimately, we find that although some physician-researchers make references to something like the weak version of the similarity position, the pediatric-researchers interviewed in this study did not describe their dual roles in a way that tightly mirrors any of the existing theoretical frameworks. We thus conclude that either physician-researchers are in need of better training regarding the nature of the accountability relationships that flow from their dual roles or that models setting out these roles and relationships must be altered to better reflect what we can reasonably expect of physician-researchers in a real-world environment.
Notes
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 2008 Mar-Apr;38(2):6; author reply 6-718457218
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 2008 Mar-Apr;38(2):5-6; author reply 6-718457217
Cites: JAMA. 2000 May 24-31;283(20):2701-1110819955
Cites: Am J Bioeth. 2002 Spring;2(2):3-912189059
Cites: Am J Bioeth. 2002 Spring;2(2):14-712189062
Cites: Am J Bioeth. 2002 Spring;2(2):22-312189066
Cites: Am J Bioeth. 2002 Spring;2(2):27-812189069
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2003 Apr 3;348(14):1386-812672868
Cites: Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2003 Jun;13(2):93-11814569997
Cites: Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2003 Dec;13(4):329-4615049297
Cites: Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2003 Dec;13(4):353-715049299
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 2004 Jan-Feb;34(1):25-3315098404
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1987 Jul 16;317(3):141-53600702
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Oct 28;280(16):1449-549801009
Cites: Health Law Rev. 2002;10(2):3-1315739307
Cites: J Law Med Ethics. 2005 Fall;33(3):566-7416240736
Cites: J Law Med Ethics. 2006 Summer;34(2):424-4016789965
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 2008 Mar-Apr;38(2):30-4218457227
PubMed ID
21974866 View in PubMed
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Accountability and psychiatric disorders: how do forensic psychiatric professionals think?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148112
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2009 Nov-Dec;32(6):355-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
Pontus Höglund
Sten Levander
Henrik Anckarsäter
Susanna Radovic
Author Affiliation
Forensic Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Science, Malmo, Lund University, Sweden. pontus.hoglund@med.lu.se
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2009 Nov-Dec;32(6):355-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Character
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Comorbidity
Dementia - diagnosis - psychology
Educational Status
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Insanity Defense
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient care team
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Social Responsibility
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Swedish penal law does not exculpate on the grounds of diminished accountability; persons judged to suffer from severe mental disorder are sentenced to forensic psychiatric care instead of prison. Re-introduction of accountability as a condition for legal responsibility has been advocated, not least by forensic psychiatric professionals. To investigate how professionals in forensic psychiatry would assess degree of accountability based on psychiatric diagnoses and case vignettes, 30 psychiatrists, 30 psychologists, 45 nurses, and 45 ward attendants from five forensic psychiatric clinics were interviewed. They were asked (i) to judge to which degree (on a dimensional scale from 1 to 5) each of 12 psychiatric diagnoses might affect accountability, (ii) to assess accountability from five case vignettes, and (iii) to list further factors they regarded as relevant for their assessment of accountability. All informants accepted to provide a dimensional assessment of accountability on this basis and consistently found most types of mental disorders to reduce accountability, especially psychotic disorders and dementia. Other factors thought to be relevant were substance abuse, social network, personality traits, social stress, and level of education.
PubMed ID
19811835 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Oncol. 1995 Dec;5(4):VII-VIII
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
J D Beatty
Source
Can J Oncol. 1995 Dec;5(4):VII-VIII
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Government Agencies
Humans
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Research
Social Responsibility
PubMed ID
8770456 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accountability in Canada's Muskoka Initiative questioned.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104322
Source
Lancet. 2014 May 10;383(9929):1621-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-2014
Author
Paul C Webster
Source
Lancet. 2014 May 10;383(9929):1621-2
Date
May-10-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Health Services - economics
Child Welfare - economics
Female
Humans
Maternal Health Services - economics
Maternal Welfare - economics
Pregnancy
Social Responsibility
Notes
Erratum In: Lancet. 2014 May 31;383(9932):e18
PubMed ID
24822257 View in PubMed
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Accountability in public health units: using a modified nominal group technique to develop a balanced scorecard for performance measurement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183128
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Sep-Oct;94(5):391-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Victoria A Robinson
Duncan Hunter
Samuel E D Shortt
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON. Robinson@hip.on.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Sep-Oct;94(5):391-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benchmarking - methods - standards
Consensus
Decision Making
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Planning Techniques
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Public Health Administration - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Social Responsibility
Abstract
Little attention has been paid to the need for accountability instruments applicable across all health units in the public health system. One tool, the balanced scorecard was created for industry and has been successfully adapted for use in Ontario hospitals. It consists of 4 quadrants: financial performance, outcomes, customer satisfaction and organizational development. The aim of the present study was to determine if a modified nominal group technique could be used to reach consensus among public health unit staff and public health specialists in Ontario about the components of a balanced scorecard for public health units.
A modified nominal group technique consensus method was used with the public health unit staff in 6 Eastern Ontario health units (n=65) and public health specialists (n=18).
73.8% of the public health unit personnel from all six health units in the eastern Ontario region participated in the survey of potential indicators. A total of 74 indicators were identified in each of the 4 quadrants: program performance (n=44); financial performance (n=11); public perceptions (n=11); and organizational performance (n=8).
The modified nominal group technique was a successful method of incorporating the views of public health personnel and specialists in the development of a balanced scorecard for public health.
PubMed ID
14577752 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accountability: unpacking the suitcase.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168409
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(3):72-5, 4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Adalsteinn D Brown
Christina Porcellato
Jan Barnsley
Author Affiliation
Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care.
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(3):72-5, 4
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Decision Making, Organizational
Health Policy
Health Services Research
Humans
Information Services
Management Audit
National health programs - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Social Responsibility
Abstract
"Accountability" is the suitcase word in Canadian healthcare. As policy-makers, managers, researchers and providers, we pack accountability with meaning, carry it around with us and open it up to explain everything from the quality of our relationships with and expectations of one another, to our requirements for more transparency in the use of resources, to our diagnosis of problems and remedies for improving our healthcare system.
PubMed ID
16826770 View in PubMed
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558 records – page 1 of 56.