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43 records – page 1 of 5.

[10th anniversary of the Year of Old Person: towards the society for all ages].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153414
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2009;22(4):535-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
O N Mikhailova
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2009;22(4):535-8
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Congresses as topic
Humans
International Cooperation
Longevity
Population Dynamics
Public Policy
Russia
Social Planning
Socioeconomic Factors
United Nations
Abstract
The paper highlights the milestones in the development of the UN idea of the Society for All Ages, originally announced as a motto of the International Year of Old Persons and later accepted as a central concept of the Madrid International Plan of Action on Aging (MIPA). In accord with MIPA building of the Society for All Ages will be a major issue in policies and programmes on aging in the XXI century. According to the UN experts opinion demographic tendencies may produce considerable impact on economy, social sphere and safety of Russia. The issues of aging are far from being completely and rapidly included into national development strategies on priority basis.
PubMed ID
20405719 View in PubMed
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Bending the urban flow: a construction-migration strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50430
Source
Int Labour Rev. 1980 Jul-Aug;119(4):467-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
R P Shaw
Source
Int Labour Rev. 1980 Jul-Aug;119(4):467-80
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algeria
Bahrain
Brazil
Colombia
Demography
Developing Countries
Economics
Emigration and Immigration
Geography
Ghana
Hong Kong
Housing
Income
Japan
Mexico
Poland
Population
Population Dynamics
Public Policy
Residence Characteristics
Residential Mobility
Social Planning
Sweden
USSR
Urban Population
Urbanization
Venezuela
Yugoslavia
Abstract
The excess rate of migration to urban centers is a problem affecting over 50 developing countries and 18 developed ones (68% of the world's population). Policies that rely on compulsion or disincentives have mostly failed because they do not deal with the cause of the problem. This paper proposes a strategy of increasing or decreasing the rate of housing construction in different urban areas as a means of stimulating or reducing migration to those areas; in most developing areas priority is given to residential construction in already congested metropolitan areas. 5 assumptions are the basis for this approach: 1) migrants tend to gravitate to the most powerful growth poles; 2) residential construction is a leading sector of regional and urban economies; 3) the encouragement of construction activity will make itself felt indirectly via its effect on construction-related employment; 4) rates of residential construction may be manipulated through government policy affecting the cost of materials, availability of loans, level of unionization, and price of housing; and 5) residential construction is amenable to quick policy action. The central idea of the strategy is that an increase in residential construction will exercise a pull on migrants, increasing job opportunities, raising incomes, lowering housing costs, and improving the chances of home ownership. This idea has been verified by various projects in Hong Kong, Ghana, Venezuela, Brazil, Bahrain, Mexico, Colombia, Poland, USSR, and the UK. In Bahrain low-income housing programs have been used to relocate Bahraini nationals in new outlying suburbs and to promote population growth in rural villages. In Mexico self-help and low-income housing programs have helped to redirect migrants headed for small towns toward smaller communities. There is also evidence to show that building construction has the potential to expand and contribute to economic growth. Some problems of implementation might be finding an adequate economic base, the need to place new communities close to primate cities, the use of large portions of the national budget, and profit-maximizing plans have been detrimental to the speed and development of construction migration. Some benefits for smaller urban areas of construction migrants in developing countries are: 1) emphasis on the development of a labor-intensive industry, 2) little training of workers as needed, 3) it can provide the housing required by industries planning to move to smaller areas, 4) this housing will be cheaper, and 5) incentives will exist to save and invest in the smaller areas.
PubMed ID
12336512 View in PubMed
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Building supportive ties and sense of community among the inner-city elderly: the Tenderloin Senior Outreach Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239341
Source
Health Educ Q. 1985;12(4):303-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
M. Minkler
Source
Health Educ Q. 1985;12(4):303-14
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
California
Community Health Services
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Housing - trends
Humans
Social Planning
Abstract
For the low-income elderly residents of America's single room occupancy (SRO) hotels, poor health, social isolation, and powerlessness often are intimately connected. This article presents a case study of an attempt to address these interrelated problems by fostering social support and social action organizing among elderly residents of San Francisco's Tenderloin hotels. Following a brief look at the parameters of the problem, an overview of the Tenderloin Senior Outreach Project (TSOP) is presented. The Project's theoretical base is described, followed by a brief account of TSOPs genesis and growth from an informal University-sponsored project to a privately incorporated community-based organization. Examples of individual and community empowerment through TSOP are presented, as is a look at some of the dilemmas and compromises that are encountered as a community group trades its grassroots status for a more formal and bureaucratized structure. Problems in the areas of indigenous leadership development and community versus funding agency agendas are examined, as is the utility of combining social action and social planning approaches to community organizing. Finally, the potentials and limitations of Freire's "education for critical consciousness" as an organizing tool in this environmental context are discussed, with implications drawn for other projects attempting to build self-reliance and community cohesion among inner-city populations.
PubMed ID
4077543 View in PubMed
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Caregiving and volunteering among older people in Sweden--prevalence and profiles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98296
Source
J Aging Soc Policy. 2009 Oct-Dec;21(4):352-73
Publication Type
Article
Author
Magnus Jegermalm
Eva Jeppsson Grassman
Author Affiliation
Ersta Sköndal University College, Sköndal, Sweden. Magnus.jegermalm@esh.se
Source
J Aging Soc Policy. 2009 Oct-Dec;21(4):352-73
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Population Dynamics
Social Planning
Social Support
Social Welfare - economics - trends
Sweden
Voluntary Health Agencies - organization & administration - trends
Voluntary Workers - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study examines the role of older people in Swedish society by exploring the prevalence of their informal caregiving and volunteering and by analyzing the profiles of these contributors of unpaid work. Data were collected by means of telephone interviews in a Swedish representative survey conducted in 2005. Our analysis reveals three distinct profiles of people involved in unpaid activities. One of these consists of those involved both in informal help giving and volunteering, a group that has been labeled "super helpers" or "doers" in earlier research. It is important for social policy planners to recognize these groups of older people and better understand the dynamics of their unpaid work in order to ascertain whether they might need support as providers and to enhance their well-being. There does not seem to be any simple contradiction between the parallel existence of a universal welfare model of the Swedish kind and an extensive civil society in which older people play important roles as active citizens.
PubMed ID
20092127 View in PubMed
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Cars before kids: automobility and the illusion of school traffic safety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140677
Source
Can Rev Sociol. 2010 May;47(2):129-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Sylvia Parusel
Arlene Tigar McLaren
Author Affiliation
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.
Source
Can Rev Sociol. 2010 May;47(2):129-47
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control
British Columbia
Child
Child Welfare
Humans
Safety
Schools
Social Conditions
Social Planning
Abstract
Traffic safety is a contested public issue and highly negotiated practice that requires sociological analysis and systematic public policy attention. In our case study, we examine elementary school traffic safety programs in Vancouver, British Columbia. We illustrate how such programs assume a politics of responsibility that largely targets children and parents for traffic safekeeping within an institutional environment that gives programs only sporadic support and funding to manage traffic risks. While this context of school traffic safety programs helps to maintain an "illusion of safety," it does not challenge the current auto-dominant mobility structure and its inherent problems.
PubMed ID
20853811 View in PubMed
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Community development: an approach to health care of Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243496
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Feb 1;126(3):223-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1982
Author
H W Bain
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Feb 1;126(3):223-4
Date
Feb-1-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Consumer Participation
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant, Newborn
Social Planning
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1972 Sep 23;107(6):523 passim5057009
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1980 Dec 20;123(12):1237-87459764
PubMed ID
7059894 View in PubMed
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Culture as a problem in linking material inequality to health: on residential crowding in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98266
Source
Health Place. 2010 May;16(3):523-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Nathanael Lauster
Frank Tester
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of British Columbia, 6303 NW Marine Drive, Vancouver, BC, Canada. nlauster@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Health Place. 2010 May;16(3):523-30
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Crowding
Cultural Characteristics
Health Status Disparities
Housing
Humans
Inuits
Nunavut
Social Change
Social Planning
Abstract
Two problems are noted in the process of measuring material inequality and linking it to health across cultural boundaries. First, comparative measurements may be used as the basis for policy making, which ends up disciplining cultural minorities. In this way, policies intended to relieve disparities can actually have the effect of extending the power of the dominant group to define appropriate cultural understanding of the world for the minority group. Second, comparative measurements may inaccurately inform theories of how inequality works to influence health and well-being. To the extent that culture mediates the relationship between inequality and outcomes of interest to researchers, those ignoring cultural differences will fail to adequately assess the impact and significance of material inequality. In this paper we discuss and illustrate these problems with reference to the study and measurement of overcrowding and its effects on health and well-being for Inuit communities in Nunavut, Canada.
PubMed ID
20096621 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Backgr Notes Ser. 1986 Nov;:1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1986
Source
Backgr Notes Ser. 1986 Nov;:1-8
Date
Nov-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Demography
Denmark
Developed Countries
Economics
Employment
Europe
Fertility
Health Manpower
Mortality
Politics
Population
Population Dynamics
Scandinavia
Social Planning
Abstract
In 1986 Denmark had a population of 5.11 million and an annual growth rate of 0.07%. Education attendance was 100%, and the literacy rate was 99%. The infant mortality rate stood at 7.7/100, and life expectancy averaged 71.5 years for men and 77.5 years for women. Of the work force of 2.5 million, 7% were engaged in agriculture and fisheries, 46% worked in industry and commerce, 13% were in the services sector, and 31% were employed by the government. Denmark's gross domestic product (GDP) was US $57.9 billion in 1985, with an annual growth rate of 3.8% and a per capita income of $11,312. Denmark is a constitutional monarchy, and political life is orderly and democratic. The largest political party, the Social Democratic Party, is closely identified with the labor movement and has held power either alone or in coalition for most of the postwar period. In recent decades, the Danish economy has been characterized by industrial expansion and diversification, as well as continued dependence on foreign trade. Today, almost 60% of total merchandise exports stem from manufactured products and the agricultural share has dropped to 30%. Beginning in the 1960s, the public sector took on an increasing number of new employees. The number of persons employed in local and central government services, especially health and social sectors, increased from 368,000 in 1967 to 678,000 in 1977. .
PubMed ID
12177921 View in PubMed
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[Disease prevention through social and labor market policies].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252953
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1974 Nov 18;136(47):2636-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-18-1974

43 records – page 1 of 5.